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Special Issue "Sustainable Food Innovation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Bigliardi Barbara

Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 181/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: open innovation; innovation management; sustainable innovation; entrepreneurship
Guest Editor
Prof. Eleonora Bottani

Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 181/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39-0521-905872
Interests: logistics; supply chain; sustainability; food industry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability is a timely issue in all industrial environments. Sustainable development is defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, and includes economic development, social and human development, coupled with environmental considerations (World Commission on Environment and Development, 1987). Sustainable development focuses on improving quality of life without increasing the use of natural resources, or, as an alternative, consuming resources that have less potential for depletion, avoiding the exploitation of easily depleted resources (Tsoulfas and Pappis, 2006). The concepts of sustainability are increasingly applied to the field of logistics and supply chain management. In particular, the increasing importance of logistic activities within the food supply chain requires an in depth understanding of sustainability. Moreover, the ever-increasing demands for nutritional and healthy products requires food products that can be sustainably produced. To keep up with this demand, scientists around the world work on innovations in sustainably to improve food security, food safety, and food quality. Consequently, in the food industry, a new type of innovation is emerging, driven by the urgent need for sustainability in this industry: The sustainability driven food innovations. The so-called “food waste recovery” trend is a typical example of this category (Galanakis, 2012).

Based on this, this Special Issue is seeking original, unpublished papers focusing on the link between innovation and sustainability in the food industry.

Prof. Barbara Bigliardi
Prof. Eleonora Bottani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food industry
  • innovation
  • sustainability
  • food sustainable innovation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Sustainable Seafood Consumption in Action: Relevant Behaviors and their Predictors
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2313; doi:10.3390/su9122313
Received: 2 November 2017 / Revised: 26 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 12 December 2017
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Abstract
Within the discussion around sustainable diets, seafood consumption is still a relatively neglected field. This article discusses relevant behaviours consumers can perform to consume seafood sustainably. The predictive power of intention, descriptive social norms, trust, awareness and pro-environmental attitudes are theoretically discussed and
[...] Read more.
Within the discussion around sustainable diets, seafood consumption is still a relatively neglected field. This article discusses relevant behaviours consumers can perform to consume seafood sustainably. The predictive power of intention, descriptive social norms, trust, awareness and pro-environmental attitudes are theoretically discussed and statistically tested across two studies in regards to (a) using sustainable seafood labels, and (b) using sustainable seafood guides. Data analysis (N1 = 309, N2 = 881 Norwegian adults) shows that intentions, social norms and trust predict seafood label use across studies. The variables predicting seafood guide use are less stable which might be due to this behaviour being performed by a very small fraction of consumers only. Causal relationships have been identified in study 2 by applying cross-lagged panel analyses between intentions, trust and social norms and seafood label use. Further causal relationships were found between intentions, trust and awareness and seafood guide use. A bidirectional relationship was confirmed between descriptive social norms and seafood guide use. Potential strategies to promote seafood label- and seafood guide use, are discussed based on these results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Innovation)
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Open AccessArticle Chinese Consumer Quality Perception and Preference of Traditional Sustainable Rice Produced by the Integrated Rice–Fish System
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2282; doi:10.3390/su9122282
Received: 22 October 2017 / Revised: 24 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 9 December 2017
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Abstract
Historically, humans have created many sustainable practices, and among the most famous and successful sustainable practice is the rice–fish system in China. While previous studies have investigated eco-labeling food from various angles, consumer perception and preference of food produced from traditional sustainable practices
[...] Read more.
Historically, humans have created many sustainable practices, and among the most famous and successful sustainable practice is the rice–fish system in China. While previous studies have investigated eco-labeling food from various angles, consumer perception and preference of food produced from traditional sustainable practices (traditional sustainable food) remain unexplored. Taking the historical rice–fish system as an example, we examined consumers’ perception and willingness to pay (WTP) for rice produced by a rice–fish system, by using data from 1422 consumers from China. Our paper shows that most Chinese consumers do understand the meaning of the rice–fish system and perceive the traditional sustainable system as environmentally friendly and producing high-quality food. The premium that consumers are willing to pay for rice from a rice–fish system is about 41%. Consumers who perceive the linkage between sustainable production and food quality and safety have a significantly higher WTP for traditional sustainable rice (p-value = 0.000). Interestingly, the perception of environment risk does not directly cause more traditional sustainable food consumption, but those who self-proclaimed as environmentalists are willing to pay a premium for traditional sustainable rice. Females, people with high family income, and people with children are more willing to pay for traditional sustainable rice. Understanding consumer perception and preference of traditional sustainable food provides critical information for Chinese policymakers to develop a cheap and efficient way to keep traditional sustainable practices and promote sustainable food consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Innovation)
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Open AccessArticle Foraging Is Determinant to Improve Smallholders’ Food Security in Rural Areas in Mali, West Africa
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2074; doi:10.3390/su9112074
Received: 3 October 2017 / Revised: 29 October 2017 / Accepted: 8 November 2017 / Published: 10 November 2017
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Abstract
Studies on the enabling factors for household food security (HFS) most often used simplified econometric models looking into the links with a selected set of variables. In this research, a livelihood approach of HFS was used and aimed at determining the most significant
[...] Read more.
Studies on the enabling factors for household food security (HFS) most often used simplified econometric models looking into the links with a selected set of variables. In this research, a livelihood approach of HFS was used and aimed at determining the most significant livelihood assets for HFS in dryland agricultural systems. Elements of the five livelihood assets were assessed through questionnaire surveys with a random sample of 180 households, and six focus group discussions in three communities along the rural-urban continuum, in Southern Mali. The coping strategy index approach was used to evaluate household food security status. Non-parametric and parametric statistical tests were combined, as appropriate, to identify the most significant determinants of HFS status. Findings indicated that most determinant factors of HFS were the diversity of wild and cultivated food plants, and hunting (natural capital); access to clean water and irrigation (infrastructural capital); and off-farm employment (financial capital). HFS also improved along the urban-rural continuum and rural households with high natural capital seemed to be more food secure. Findings call for important investment to expand the natural capital (e.g., domestication of new crops and agricultural diversification) and infrastructural capital (irrigation facilities, clean water) of the rural households. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Food Innovation)
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