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Special Issue "Integrated Migration Management, ICTs' enhanced Responses and Policy Making: Towards Human Centric Migration Management Systems"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Anna Visvizi

1. School of Business, Deree—The American College of Greece, 6 Gravias Street GR-153 42 Aghia Paraskevi Athens, Greece
2. Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: smart cities; migration; innovation networks; international business; political economy; economic integration; politics; EU, Central Europe, China
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Miltiadis D. Lytras

1. School of Business, Deree—The American College of Greece, 6 Gravias Street GR-153 42 Aghia Paraskevi Athens, Greece
2. Effat University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cognitive computing; artificial intelligence; data science; bioinformatics; innovation; big data research; data mining; emerging technologies; information systems; technology driven innovation; knowledge management
Guest Editor
Prof. Marta Pachocka

Department of Political Studies, Collegium of Socio-Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, ul. Wiśniowa 41, pok. 66D, 02-520 Warszawa, Poland
E-Mail
Interests: socio-demographic changes in Europe/EU; Europe/EU and international migration; EU policy on migration, asylum and border management; immigration policy and integration policy in France; France’s international position; European economy, world economy; forced migration and refugee studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The twin migration and refugee crises that challenged several European countries and the European Union (EU) as a whole over the period 2015–2016 revealed that developed world cities and urban areas are largely unprepared to address the variety of challenges that irregular migratory flows generate. In this Special Issue, we query the premises of the smart and resilient cities debates, respectively, to highlight that migration-related challenges and opportunities have not been explicitly addressed in those debates, thus creating a considerable disconnect between what these debates promise and what cities/urban systems increasingly need to deal with on a daily basis. The purpose of this Special Issue is to outline the relevance of bridging the disjuncture, and by incorporating the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the analysis to propose a dynamic analytical framework, a model, apt to employ the key arguments and policy-recommendations of both debates, as well as the promise of ICT for the sake of, on the one hand, alleviating the pressures cities/urban systems face, and on the other hand, serving both the receiving and the incoming populations. The dynamics of that convergence is defined by two hierarchically interconnected levers/gears, i.e., that of ICT, as well as policy-design and policy-making. Accordingly, while this Special Issue makes a case for an ICT-enabled integrated framework for resilient urban systems, it also makes argues for an ethically sensitive, human centred use of smart technologies beyond the high-tech hype (Visvizi, et al., 2017).

The objective of this Special Issue is to disseminate latest, high quality, interdisciplinary research in the domain of Migration Management and Information Technology and to introduce also the concept of Social Inclusive Migration Integration as a key response to the wellbeing and prosperity of modern societies through the adoption of integrative strategies for human development and economic growth with the use of sophisticated technologies and advanced models of human development.

This Special Issue seeks to uncover and present the latest developments in meeting the needs a modern Migration Management and Smart Regions Vision towards sustainable development, prosperity and happiness for humanity.

For this Special Issue, we welcome papers dealing with case studies, literature review, survey findings, analytical methods, and tools. Examples of topics of interests include:

  • Conceptual issues and their regulatory- and policy-making implications
  • Migration in context of the public goods debate
  • Migration and immigration policy in context of the refugee- and migration-crises in Europe
  • Migration and refugee crises in Europe of 2014+ – determinants and consequences
  • Integration of immigrants and integration policy in European countries
  • Local and regional dimensions of mixed migration
  • Smart cities and urban areas and mixed migration
  • Boarder management policies and tools vis-à-vis mixed migration
  • Legal issues and their implications
  • Mixed migration in international context: regional, national and local dimensions
  • Refugee, asylum, relocation and resettlement – European experience yesterday and today
  • Politics and policy-making of mixed migration
  • Big Data approaches to Open Migration Linked Data
  • Indexing of Migration Data
  • Migration Analytics and Key Performance Indicators for Migration Management
  • Social Network solutions for Migration Management
  • Privacy and Trust in Migration Management Information Systems
  • Cloud Computing Applications for Migration Management
  • Advanced Sensor Technologies and Mobile Networks for Migration Emergency Systems
  • Technology Driven Policy Making for Migration Management
  • Social Business Systems and Migration Management
  • Sentiment Analysis for Migration
  • Funded Research Projects show cases

Reference

Visvizi, A.; Mazzucelli, C.; Lytras, M. Irregular migratory flows: Towards an ICTs’ enabled integrated framework for resilient urban systems. J. Sci. Technol. Policy Manag. 2017, 8, 227–242. Available online: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/JSTPM-05-2017-0020.

Prof. Anna Visvizi
Prof. Marta Pachocka
Prof. Miltiadis D. Lytras
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Migration
  • European Union
  • Policy making
  • Resilient Cities
  • Human Centric Computing
  • ICTs Migration and refugee crises
  • Policy instruments
  • Smart urban applications
  • Data Mining
  • Analytics
  • Cloud computing and open source technologies
  • Sustainability
  • Social Inclusive Economic Growth
  • Irregular Migratory flows
  • Smart Technologies
  • ICTs
  • Open Government
  • Smart Innovation

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle An Overview of the Romanian Asylum Policies
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1461; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051461
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 May 2018 / Published: 7 May 2018
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Abstract
Migration flows affecting Europe over recent years have generated a wave of solidarity but also fear and threats. European countries are divided into host countries or countries of transit due to their economic attractiveness but from the beginning, it was clear that asylum
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Migration flows affecting Europe over recent years have generated a wave of solidarity but also fear and threats. European countries are divided into host countries or countries of transit due to their economic attractiveness but from the beginning, it was clear that asylum policies were far from similar and insufficiently flexible. Although Romania is considered as one of the transit countries for immigrants heading to Western Europe and it has not been confronted with an influx of refugees, it has developed specific policies in line with the acquis communautaire in order to be prepared for any situation of influx. The purpose of this research is to assess how asylum policies have been implemented in Romania and what improvements are necessary in order for them to become more sustainable. In Romania’s case, we used a SWOT analysis in our research methodology. This study aims to address relevant topics regarding the recent increasing trends of asylum applications and to analyse how the asylum policies in Romania can generate an adequate response. Furthermore, specialized institutions may consider our recommendations on how to improve the management of the asylum system in Romania. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Social Isolation among North Korean Refugee Women in South Korea: The Moderating Role of Formal and Informal Support
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041246
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 11 April 2018 / Accepted: 15 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
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Abstract
While there is abundant literature on the positive correlation between refugee post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social isolation, few studies have examined the moderating effects of formal and informal interpersonal support. This study on 154 refugee women from North Korea examines the moderating
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While there is abundant literature on the positive correlation between refugee post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social isolation, few studies have examined the moderating effects of formal and informal interpersonal support. This study on 154 refugee women from North Korea examines the moderating effects of formal and informal interpersonal support on the relationship between PTSD and social isolation. Data from the 2012 survey of the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family in South Korea Study on Support for Independent Living Tailored to North Korean Refugee Women Exposed to Violence were included in the present study. The study results confirmed the positive correlation between PTSD and social isolation and verified the protective effects of formal support. These findings will contribute to policy changes and early proactive interventions to reduce the social isolation of North Korean refugee women in South Korea. Full article
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Open AccessArticle International Migrant Remittances in the Context of Economic and Social Sustainable Development. A Comparative Study of Romania-Bulgaria
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1156; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041156
Received: 3 March 2018 / Revised: 31 March 2018 / Accepted: 4 April 2018 / Published: 12 April 2018
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Abstract
The economic stability is the main goal of every country’s administration, contributing to the decrease of uncertainty, creating an attractive business environment, attracting foreign direct investment and contributing to economic growth, which increases the standard of living, reduces income inequalities, represents a sustainable
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The economic stability is the main goal of every country’s administration, contributing to the decrease of uncertainty, creating an attractive business environment, attracting foreign direct investment and contributing to economic growth, which increases the standard of living, reduces income inequalities, represents a sustainable development for the country and puts an end to the migration process. Migration flows lower the demographic resources of the states going through this process and consequently they compromise the possibility for future generations to support a sustainable economic growth. Migration is a process with an aggressive and alarming manifestation in Romania and Bulgaria, raising the problem of the future capacity of these countries to ensure long-term economic and social sustainability and requiring an analysis framework from a scientific perspective. The current study proposes a comparative study to identify the important determinants of international migration in the EU28 and analyses the impact of remittances on economic growth/stability and income inequality in Romania and Bulgaria—Central and Eastern Europe countries—for the period between 1990 and 2015. The main contribution of the present study consists in emphasising the common determinants of the two countries regarding the migration process and at the same time providing solutions to improve government policies to contribute to the economic and social sustainability. The authors employed a multiple regression model and the correlation analysis, and tested 8 hypotheses for Romania and Bulgaria. The results indicated that the main determinants of the migration process in Romania and Bulgaria are the inflation rate, the income inequality and household consumption expenditure. Furthermore, the results indicated that there is not a direct relationship between the remittances received/capita and GDP/capita growth rate in Romania and Bulgaria. In addition, there is a direct relationship (negative and with average intensity) between the remittances received/capita and price inflation rate in Romania but not in Bulgaria. In the case of Romania and Bulgaria, the results indicate that there is a direct relationship with a similar intensity between the remittances received/capita and the unemployment rate, the household final consumption and income inequality. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Spatio-Temporal Characteristics and Modeling Research of Inter-Provincial Migration in China
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030618
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 5 February 2018 / Accepted: 22 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1734 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The national census data during 1995 and 2000 and during 2005 and 2010 are selected in this paper to make an analysis of the spatio-temporal characteristics of the inter-provincial population migration in China. In addition, the general regression model, the extension regression model
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The national census data during 1995 and 2000 and during 2005 and 2010 are selected in this paper to make an analysis of the spatio-temporal characteristics of the inter-provincial population migration in China. In addition, the general regression model, the extension regression model considering the historical dependent variable and the spatial lag model are established based on the gravity model to make the regression model on China’s inter-provincial population migration over two periods of time. The results show that: (1) the inter-provincial population migration increases rapidly in size with strong geographical proximity; (2) China’s inter-provincial population migration is still in the primary stage of the general process of population migration. In other words, the inter-provincial population emigration and immigration levels have increased greatly with the economic development; (3) Statistically, the inter-provincial population migration is negatively correlated with the level of economic development in the emigrant place and the migration distance and positively correlated with the level of economic development in the immigrant place and the population scale in the emigrant and immigrant places; and (4) The spatio-temporal factor is an important explanatory variable of population migration. The introduction of the historical dependent variable and the spatial lag factor can improve the regression effect of the gravity model greatly, and the historical variable and the spatial factor have strong explanatory power for the inter-provincial population migration. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Measuring International Migration in Azerbaijan
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010132
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 31 December 2017 / Accepted: 5 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (544 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
International migration significantly affects economic, social, cultural, and political factors of the country. Owing to this situation, it can be said that the reasons of international migration should be analyzed in order to control this problem. The purpose of this study is to
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International migration significantly affects economic, social, cultural, and political factors of the country. Owing to this situation, it can be said that the reasons of international migration should be analyzed in order to control this problem. The purpose of this study is to determine the influencing factors of international migration in Azerbaijan. In this scope, annual data of 11 explanatory variables for the period of 1995–2015 was analyzed via Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) method. According to the results of this analysis, it was identified that people prefer to move other countries in case of high unemployment rates. In addition, the results of the study show that population growth and high mortality rate increases the migration level. While considering these results, it was recommended that Azerbaijan should focus on these aspects to control international migration problem. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Exploring the Determinants of Migrant Workers’ Willingness to Buy Houses in Cities: A Case Study in Xi’an, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010062
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 23 December 2017 / Accepted: 26 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
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Abstract
Migrant workers’ buying houses in cities can not only help to reduce the number of unsold houses but also improve the efficiency of the use of rural residential lands. A framework is constructed to study how individual resource endowment and the compensation policy
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Migrant workers’ buying houses in cities can not only help to reduce the number of unsold houses but also improve the efficiency of the use of rural residential lands. A framework is constructed to study how individual resource endowment and the compensation policy of quitting rural residential land act on migrant workers’ willingness to buy houses in cities. The paper adopts the logistic regression model with the data collected from 410 migrant workers in Xi’an. The results can be drawn as follows: firstly, migrant workers’ desire for buying houses in cities has a close relationship with their individual resource endowment; secondly, there is a gap between the existing compensation policy and migrant workers’ actual preference for the compensation policies. Thirdly, the existing compensation policy cannot fully exert its impact. As a result, when migrant workers are allowed to choose their most preferred policies in light of their own conditions, both the policy and resource effect will become more remarked. Thus, the design of compensation policies for quitting rural residential land should take full account of migrant workers’ individual resource endowments in order to provide them with selective compensation mechanisms. The conclusion provides a policy reference for cities where the house prices are close to that of Xi’an (11,000 yuan/square m). Full article
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