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Special Issue "Climate Resilient Urban Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Urban and Rural Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 March 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Darryn McEvoy

RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban resilience; climate change adaptation; vulnerability and risk assessments; community-based adaptation; communicating climate risks

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Urbanization and a changing climate are two of the most significant challenges facing societies in the coming years and decades. With over 50% of the world’s population now living in towns and cities, trends towards increasing urbanization are likely to continue into the future as people look to cities for improved employment, health, and educational opportunities. However, these inter-related challenges are proving particularly acute for those parts of the world that are experiencing rapid urbanization and have limited institutional capacity to respond. In many cities in the developing world for instance, urbanization rates are leading to the growth of informal settlements in cities and surrounding areas, and the creation of ‘urban poor’ communities that are well-documented as being especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate-related hazards. These vulnerabilities will be further amplified by a changing climate into the future.

This Special Issue on climate resilient urban development provides both academic and practical evidence drawn from across the world to highlight how the interface of climate and development stressors is impacting the continued sustainability of contemporary urban systems in different geographical contexts, and how cities—and their communities—are responding to these climate resilience and development challenges in new and innovative ways.

Suggested topics for this special issue include:

- Conceptual or applied papers on urbanization and global environmental change (linkages between development/DRR/climate change adaptation);
- Vulnerability/risk assessments;
- Resilience planning;
- Adaptation strategies for heat/flood/drought etc in the urban environment;
- Planning for, and responding to, extreme events;
- Community-based adaptation and issues of equity;
- Links between land tenure and climate vulnerability;
- Climate resilient buildings and infrastructure;
- Food, water and energy security in a changing climate;
- Development economics (in the context of climate change);
- Public-private initiatives;
- Urban governance for climate resilience.

Prof. Dr. Darryn McEvoy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Urbanization
  • Development
  • Climate change
  • Resilience
  • Informal settlements
  • Adaptation
  • Adaptive capacity
  • Governance
  • Participation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview A Review of Urban Planning Research for Climate Change
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2224; doi:10.3390/su9122224
Received: 30 October 2017 / Revised: 25 November 2017 / Accepted: 27 November 2017 / Published: 2 December 2017
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Abstract
This paper identified the research focus and development tendency of urban planning and climate change research from 1990 to 2016 using CiteSpace, which is based on the Web of Science database. Through cluster analysis and a document sorting method, the research direction of
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This paper identified the research focus and development tendency of urban planning and climate change research from 1990 to 2016 using CiteSpace, which is based on the Web of Science database. Through cluster analysis and a document sorting method, the research direction of city planning and climate change were mainly divided into four academic groupings, 15 clusters with homogenous themes representing the current research focus direction at the sub-level. The detailed study on the framework presented three mainstream developing directions: (1) The index assessment and spatial simulation on the impact of urban spatial systems for climate change have become important methods to identify and improve the adaptability of urban space. (2) Adaptive governance as a bottom-up strategy giving priority to institutional adaptation policy and collaborative polices for responding to climate change has become the hot direction in recent years. (3) The policies of urban public health-related urban equity, vulnerability, and environmental sustainability were addressed especially during the period from 2007 to 2009. Dynamic evolution trends of the research field were discussed: (1) The total numbers of papers in this field increased distinctly between 2005 and 2008, research focus shifted from single-dimension to multi-dimension comprehensive studies, and the humanism tendency was obvious. (2) After 2010, research on multi-level governance and spatial adaptation strategies became the key issues, and a bottom-up level adaptation policies were addressed. Finally, the critical influence of the important literature and the forefront issues of the research field were put forward. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Resilient Urban Development)
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Open AccessReview Unpacking the Pacific Urban Agenda: Resilience Challenges and Opportunities
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1878; doi:10.3390/su9101878
Received: 6 September 2017 / Revised: 11 October 2017 / Accepted: 14 October 2017 / Published: 23 October 2017
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Abstract
Pacific Island Countries (PICs) are often cited as being the most vulnerable to the future impacts of a changing climate. Furthermore, being located in the ‘Pacific Rim of Fire’, PICs have long been exposed to the impacts of a range of natural and
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Pacific Island Countries (PICs) are often cited as being the most vulnerable to the future impacts of a changing climate. Furthermore, being located in the ‘Pacific Rim of Fire’, PICs have long been exposed to the impacts of a range of natural and climate-related extreme events—such as earthquakes and cyclones—and are considered to be amongst the most vulnerable countries to natural disasters. The physical vulnerability of Pacific towns and cities is further exaggerated by development deficits, geographical isolation, weak governance, and complex issues of land tenure. This paper, based on substantive project experience in the Pacific region by each of the authors, reviews the resilience challenges facing Melanesian cities in the context of rapid urbanization and global environmental change. It then sets this in the context of the global ‘New Urban Agenda’ which was launched at Habitat III in Quito at the end of 2016, setting out the critical implementation challenges and opportunities for enhancing urban resilience in the Pacific. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Resilient Urban Development)
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