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Special Issue "Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Laura M. Lechuga

NanoBiosensors and Bioanalytical Applications Group, Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), CSIC and CIBER-BBN, Campus de la UAB, Edifici ICN2, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34935868012
Interests: photonic biosensors; plasmonic and nanoplasmonic sensors; lab-on-chip devices; optonanomechanics biosensors; biofunctionalization; nanomedicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics biosensors are the most successful optical biosensors. Continuous progress is materials, nanostructures and transducers together with advanced biofunctionalization techniques, new receptors and applications employing real samples, makes them as the most studied and developed biosensors. A myriad of companies have been generated in the last years around this powerful plamonic biosensing technology.

The aim of this special issue is to bring together innovative developments at the transducer schemes, nanostructures, miniaturization, biofunctionalization and applications of plasmonics and nanoplasmonics biosensors. Papers addressing the wide aspects range of this technology are sought, including but not limited to recent developments in: new transducers schemes in plasmonic and nanoplasmonics, hybrid devices, improvement of sensitivity, miniaturization and multiplexing capabilities, competitive biofunctionalization techniques, and real-life application.

Both review articles and original research papers are solicited. There is particular interest in papers concerning new applications in real life where plasmonics and nanoplasmonics could provide enhanced capabilities that cannot be obtained using other approaches.

Prof. Dr. Laura M. Lechuga
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • Plasmonics sensor
  • Nanoplasmonics sensor
  • Biosensors
  • Biofunctionalization techniques
  • microfluidics
  • plasmonics materials
  • point-of-care
  • medical diagnostics
  • environmental control

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle A Simple Small Size and Low Cost Sensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance for Selective Detection of Fe(III)
Sensors 2014, 14(3), 4657-4671; doi:10.3390/s140304657
Received: 16 January 2014 / Revised: 28 February 2014 / Accepted: 4 March 2014 / Published: 7 March 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (443 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF), has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III). DFO-SAM sensors based on
[...] Read more.
A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF), has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III). DFO-SAM sensors based on appropriate electrochemical techniques can be frequently found in the scientific literature. In this work, we present the first example of a DFO-SAM sensor based on SPR in an optical fiber. The SPR sensing platform was realized by removing the cladding of a plastic optical fiber along half the circumference, spin coating a buffer of Microposit S1813 photoresist on the exposed core, and finally sputtering a thin gold film. The hydroxamate siderophore deferoxamine (DFO), having high binding affinity for Fe(III), is then used in its immobilized form, as self-assembled monolayer on the gold layer surface of the POF sensor. The results showed that the DFO-SAM-POF-sensor was able to sense the formation of the Fe(III)/DFO complex in the range of concentrations between 1 μm and 50 μm with a linearity range from 0 to 30 μm of Fe(III). The selectivity of the sensor was also proved by interference tests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle Direct Detection of Protein Biomarkers in Human Fluids Using Site-Specific Antibody Immobilization Strategies
Sensors 2014, 14(2), 2239-2258; doi:10.3390/s140202239
Received: 24 December 2013 / Revised: 20 January 2014 / Accepted: 24 January 2014 / Published: 29 January 2014
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (865 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Design of an optimal surface biofunctionalization still remains an important challenge for the application of biosensors in clinical practice and therapeutic follow-up. Optical biosensors offer real-time monitoring and highly sensitive label-free analysis, along with great potential to be transferred to portable devices. When
[...] Read more.
Design of an optimal surface biofunctionalization still remains an important challenge for the application of biosensors in clinical practice and therapeutic follow-up. Optical biosensors offer real-time monitoring and highly sensitive label-free analysis, along with great potential to be transferred to portable devices. When applied in direct immunoassays, their analytical features depend strongly on the antibody immobilization strategy. A strategy for correct immobilization of antibodies based on the use of ProLinker™ has been evaluated and optimized in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, stability and reproducibility. Special effort has been focused on avoiding antibody manipulation, preventing nonspecific adsorption and obtaining a robust biosurface with regeneration capabilities. ProLinker™-based approach has demonstrated to fulfill those crucial requirements and, in combination with PEG-derivative compounds, has shown encouraging results for direct detection in biological fluids, such as pure urine or diluted serum. Furthermore, we have implemented the ProLinker™ strategy to a novel nanoplasmonic-based biosensor resulting in promising advantages for its application in clinical and biomedical diagnosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle Label-Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance: A New Concept for Improved Performance in Optical Biosensor Analysis
Sensors 2013, 13(11), 15348-15363; doi:10.3390/s131115348
Received: 20 September 2013 / Revised: 29 October 2013 / Accepted: 2 November 2013 / Published: 8 November 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (461 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where
[...] Read more.
Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a well-established optical biosensor technology with many proven applications in the study of molecular interactions as well as in surface and material science. SPR is usually applied in the label-free mode which may be advantageous in cases where the presence of a label may potentially interfere with the studied interactions per se. However, the fundamental challenges of label-free SPR in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity are well known. Here we present a new concept called label-enhanced SPR, which is based on utilizing strongly absorbing dye molecules in combination with the evaluation of the full shape of the SPR curve, whereby the sensitivity as well as the specificity of SPR is significantly improved. The performance of the new label-enhanced SPR method was demonstrated by two simple model assays: a small molecule assay and a DNA hybridization assay. The small molecule assay was used to demonstrate the sensitivity enhancement of the method, and how competitive assays can be used for relative affinity determination. The DNA assay was used to demonstrate the selectivity of the assay, and the capabilities in eliminating noise from bulk liquid composition variations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle ABO Blood-Typing Using an Antibody Array Technique Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging
Sensors 2013, 13(9), 11913-11922; doi:10.3390/s130911913
Received: 4 July 2013 / Revised: 23 August 2013 / Accepted: 2 September 2013 / Published: 9 September 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (614 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, readily available antibodies that are used in standard agglutination tests were evaluated for their use in ABO blood typing by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) technique. Five groups of antibodies, including mixed clones of anti-A, anti-B, and anti-AB,
[...] Read more.
In this study, readily available antibodies that are used in standard agglutination tests were evaluated for their use in ABO blood typing by a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPR imaging) technique. Five groups of antibodies, including mixed clones of anti-A, anti-B, and anti-AB, and single clones of anti-A and anti-B, were used to construct the five-line detection arrays using a multichannel flow cell in the SPR imager. The red blood cell (RBC) samples were applied to a multichannel flow cell that was orthogonal to the detection line arrays for blood group typing. We found that the blood samples were correctly grouped in less than 12 min by the SPR imaging technique, and the results were consistent with those of the standard agglutination technique for all 60 samples. We found that mixed clones of antibodies provided 33%–68% greater change in the SPR signal than the single-clone antibodies. Applying the SPR imaging technique using readily available antibodies may reduce the costs of the antibodies, shorten the measurement time, and increase the throughput. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Recent Advances in Plasmonic Sensors
Sensors 2014, 14(5), 7959-7973; doi:10.3390/s140507959
Received: 24 February 2014 / Revised: 16 April 2014 / Accepted: 22 April 2014 / Published: 5 May 2014
Cited by 32 | PDF Full-text (855 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plasmonic sensing has been an important multidisciplinary research field and has been extensively used in detection of trace molecules in chemistry and biology. The sensing techniques are typically based on surface-enhanced spectroscopies and surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). This review article deals with some
[...] Read more.
Plasmonic sensing has been an important multidisciplinary research field and has been extensively used in detection of trace molecules in chemistry and biology. The sensing techniques are typically based on surface-enhanced spectroscopies and surface plasmon resonances (SPRs). This review article deals with some recent advances in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors and SPR sensors using either localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) or propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The advances discussed herein present some improvements in SERS and SPR sensing, as well as a new type of nanowire-based SPP sensor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
Open AccessReview Synthesis of Silver Nanostructures by Multistep Methods
Sensors 2014, 14(4), 5860-5889; doi:10.3390/s140405860
Received: 13 January 2014 / Revised: 16 March 2014 / Accepted: 18 March 2014 / Published: 25 March 2014
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (1252 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The shape of plasmonic nanostructures such as silver and gold is vital to their physical and chemical properties and potential applications. Recently, preparation of complex nanostructures with rich function by chemical multistep methods is the hotspot of research. In this review we introduce
[...] Read more.
The shape of plasmonic nanostructures such as silver and gold is vital to their physical and chemical properties and potential applications. Recently, preparation of complex nanostructures with rich function by chemical multistep methods is the hotspot of research. In this review we introduce three typical multistep methods to prepare silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, including the double reductant method, etching technique and construction of core-shell nanostructures. The growth mechanism of double the reductant method is that different favorable facets of silver nanocrystals are produced in different reductants, which can be used to prepare complex nanostructures such as nanoflags with ultranarrow resonant band bandwidth or some silver nanostructures which are difficult to prepare using other methods. The etching technique can selectively remove nanoparticles to achieve the aim of shape control and is widely used for the synthesis of nanoflowers and hollow nanostructures. Construction of core-shell nanostructures is another tool to control shape and size. The three methods can not only prepare various silver nanostructures with well-controlled shapes, which exhibit unique optical properties, such as strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect, but also have potential application in many areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
Figures

Open AccessReview Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis
Sensors 2014, 14(3), 4948-4959; doi:10.3390/s140304948
Received: 24 December 2013 / Revised: 26 February 2014 / Accepted: 27 February 2014 / Published: 11 March 2014
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (589 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors detect the refractive index (RI) changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using
[...] Read more.
Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors detect the refractive index (RI) changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI) system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
Open AccessReview Plasmonic Sensors Based on Doubly-Deposited Tapered Optical Fibers
Sensors 2014, 14(3), 4791-4805; doi:10.3390/s140304791
Received: 17 January 2014 / Revised: 27 February 2014 / Accepted: 3 March 2014 / Published: 10 March 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A review of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) transducers based on tapered fibers that have been developed in the last years is presented. The devices have proved their good performance (specifically, in terms of sensitivity) and their versatility and they are a very
[...] Read more.
A review of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) transducers based on tapered fibers that have been developed in the last years is presented. The devices have proved their good performance (specifically, in terms of sensitivity) and their versatility and they are a very good option to be considered as basis for any kind of chemical and biological sensor. The technology has now reached its maturity and here we summarize some of the characteristics of the devices produced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonics and Nanoplasmonics Biosensors)
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