E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Multimetallic Nanoparticles for Chemical/Biological Sensing Applications"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shinya Maenosono

School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +81 761 51 1625
Interests: metal nanoparticles; magnetic nanoparticles; semiconductor nanoparticles; chemical sensors; biosensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metal nanoparticles (e.g. gold and silver nanoparticles) have long been utilized for various types of chemical and/or biological sensing applications. At the same time, much of the knowledge being gained for manipulating nanoparticle structure or composition has focused on multimetallic type nanoparticles. Such systems can display multiple properties arising from the individual components, but it is the observation of synergistic phenomena that is the most intriguing.

By taking advantage of such synergestic phenomena in multimetallic nanoparticles including alloy, core-shell, and other heterostructures, one can enhance the sensing propeties when these multimetallic nanoparticles are used as sensing probes.

This special issue aims to cover all various aspects, such as (but not limited to) novel multimetallic nanoparticles as sensing probes, new insights in synergestic phenomena in terms of sensing properties, and sensing applications of multimetallic nanoparticles.

Prof. Dr. Shinya Maenosono
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • metal nanoparticle
  • multimetallic nanoparticle
  • chemical sensor
  • biosensor
  • plasmonic sensor
  • magnetic sensor
  • catalytic sensor
  • electrochemical sensor

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Behaviour of Zinc Complexes and Zinc Sulphide Nanoparticles Revealed by Using Screen Printed Electrodes and Spectrometry
Sensors 2013, 13(11), 14417-14437; doi:10.3390/s131114417
Received: 1 August 2013 / Revised: 3 September 2013 / Accepted: 8 October 2013 / Published: 25 October 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (2113 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, we focused on microfluidic electrochemical analysis of zinc complexes (Zn(phen)(his)Cl2, Zn(his)Cl2) and ZnS quantum dots (QDs) using printed electrodes. This method was chosen due to the simple (easy to use) instrumentation and variable setting of flows.
[...] Read more.
In this study, we focused on microfluidic electrochemical analysis of zinc complexes (Zn(phen)(his)Cl2, Zn(his)Cl2) and ZnS quantum dots (QDs) using printed electrodes. This method was chosen due to the simple (easy to use) instrumentation and variable setting of flows. Reduction signals of zinc under the strictly defined and controlled conditions (pH, temperature, flow rate, accumulation time and applied potential) were studied. We showed that the increasing concentration of the complexes (Zn(phen)(his)Cl2, Zn(his)Cl2) led to a decrease in the electrochemical signal and a significant shift of the potential to more positive values. The most likely explanation of this result is that zinc is strongly bound in the complex and its distribution on the electrode is very limited. Changing the pH from 3.5 to 5.5 resulted in a significant intensification of the Zn(II) reduction signal. The complexes were also characterized by UV/VIS spectrophotometry, chromatography, and ESI-QTOF mass spectrometry. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Gold Nanoparticles Enhanced Surface Plasmon Resonance Immunosensor for Highly Sensitive Detection of Ischemia-Modified Albumin
Sensors 2013, 13(10), 12794-12803; doi:10.3390/s131012794
Received: 18 July 2013 / Revised: 12 September 2013 / Accepted: 17 September 2013 / Published: 25 September 2013
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (649 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study a novel sensitive nanogold particle sensor enhancement based on mixed self-assembled monolayers was explored and used to construct a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor to detect Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA). Compared with a direct binding SPR assay at a limit
[...] Read more.
In this study a novel sensitive nanogold particle sensor enhancement based on mixed self-assembled monolayers was explored and used to construct a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) immunosensor to detect Ischemia Modified Albumin (IMA). Compared with a direct binding SPR assay at a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 ng/L, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 10 nm dramatically improved the LOD of IMA to 10 ng/L. Meanwhile, no interfering substance that may lead to false positive results was identified. These results suggested that the SPR biosensor presented superior properties, and provided a simple label-free strategy to increase assay sensitivity for further acute coronary syndrome (ACS) diagnosis. Full article
Open AccessArticle Synthesis of Bimetallic Platinum Nanoparticles for Biosensors
Sensors 2013, 13(8), 10358-10369; doi:10.3390/s130810358
Received: 2 July 2013 / Revised: 5 August 2013 / Accepted: 7 August 2013 / Published: 12 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (485 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of magnetic nanomaterials in biosensing applications is growing as a consequence of their remarkable properties; but controlling the composition and shape of metallic nanoalloys is problematic when more than one precursor is required for wet chemistry synthesis. We have developed a
[...] Read more.
The use of magnetic nanomaterials in biosensing applications is growing as a consequence of their remarkable properties; but controlling the composition and shape of metallic nanoalloys is problematic when more than one precursor is required for wet chemistry synthesis. We have developed a successful simultaneous reduction method for preparation of near-spherical platinum-based nanoalloys containing magnetic solutes. We avoided particular difficulties in preparing platinum nanoalloys containing Ni, Co and Fe by the identification of appropriate synthesis temperatures and chemistry. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to show that our particles have a narrow size distribution, uniform size and morphology, and good crystallinity in the as-synthesized condition. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms the coexistence of Pt with the magnetic solute in a face-centered cubic (FCC) solid solution. Full article
Open AccessArticle Nano-Molar Deltamethrin Sensor Based on Electrical Impedance of PAH/PAZO Layer-by-Layer Sensing Films
Sensors 2013, 13(8), 10167-10176; doi:10.3390/s130810167
Received: 19 July 2013 / Revised: 1 August 2013 / Accepted: 5 August 2013 / Published: 8 August 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (692 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work reports a novel deltamethrin (DM) sensor able to detect nano-molar concentrations in ethanol solutions. The sensing layer consists of a thin film, obtained via a layer-by-layer technique, from alternate adsorption of poly(allylamine chloride) (PAH) and poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)-benzenesulfonamide)-1,2-ethanediyl]sodium salt] (PAZO) onto a solid
[...] Read more.
This work reports a novel deltamethrin (DM) sensor able to detect nano-molar concentrations in ethanol solutions. The sensing layer consists of a thin film, obtained via a layer-by-layer technique, from alternate adsorption of poly(allylamine chloride) (PAH) and poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo)-benzenesulfonamide)-1,2-ethanediyl]sodium salt] (PAZO) onto a solid support with interdigitaded gold electrodes. The sensor response, obtained from impedance spectroscopy measurements, was revealed to be linear with respect to the real part of impedance, taken at 100 Hz, when plotted as a function of the logarithm of deltamethrin molar concentrations in the micro- to nano-molar range. Sensor sensitivity was of 41.1 ± 0.7 kΩ per decade of concentration for an immersion time above 2 min and the reproducibility is approximately 2% in a binary solution of ethanol and deltamethrin. The main insight of this work concerns to DM detection limits as the sensor revealed to be able to detect concentrations below 0.1 nM, a value which is significantly lower than any reported in the literature and close what is appropriate for in situ environmental contaminant detection. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Rapid Quantitative Detection of Brucella melitensis by a Label-Free Impedance Immunosensor Based on a Gold Nanoparticle-Modified Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode
Sensors 2013, 13(7), 8551-8563; doi:10.3390/s130708551
Received: 20 May 2013 / Revised: 21 June 2013 / Accepted: 21 June 2013 / Published: 4 July 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (596 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A rapid and simple method for quantitative monitoring of Brucella melitensis using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is reported for the first time. The label-free immunosensors were fabricated by immobilizing Brucella melitensis antibody on the surface of gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrodes (GNP-SPCEs). Cyclic
[...] Read more.
A rapid and simple method for quantitative monitoring of Brucella melitensis using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is reported for the first time. The label-free immunosensors were fabricated by immobilizing Brucella melitensis antibody on the surface of gold nanoparticle-modified screen-printed carbon electrodes (GNP-SPCEs). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and EIS were used to characterize the Brucella melitensis antigen interaction on the surface of GNP-SPCEs with antibody. A general electronic equivalent model of an electrochemical cell was introduced for interpretation of the impedance components of the system. The results showed that the change in electron-transfer resistance (Rct) was significantly different due to the binding of Brucella melitensis cells. A linear relationship between the Rct variation and logarithmic value of the cell concentration was found from 4 × 104 to 4 × 106 CFU/mL in pure culture. The label-free impedance biosensor was able to detect as low as 1 × 104 and 4 × 105 CFU/mL of Brucella melitensis in pure culture and milk samples, respectively, in less than 1.5 h. Moreover, a good selectivity versus Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus cells was obtained for our developed immunosensor demonstrating its specificity towards only Brucella melitensis. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Transverse Susceptibility as a Biosensor for Detection of Au-Fe3O4 Nanoparticle-Embedded Human Embryonic Kidney Cells
Sensors 2013, 13(7), 8490-8500; doi:10.3390/s130708490
Received: 19 April 2013 / Revised: 24 June 2013 / Accepted: 25 June 2013 / Published: 3 July 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We demonstrate the possibility of using a radio-frequency transverse susceptibility (TS) technique based on a sensitive self-resonant tunnel-diode oscillator as a biosensor for detection of cancer cells that have taken up magnetic nanoparticles. This technique can detect changes in frequency on the order
[...] Read more.
We demonstrate the possibility of using a radio-frequency transverse susceptibility (TS) technique based on a sensitive self-resonant tunnel-diode oscillator as a biosensor for detection of cancer cells that have taken up magnetic nanoparticles. This technique can detect changes in frequency on the order of 10 Hz in 10 MHz. Therefore, a small sample of cells that have taken up nanoparticles when placed inside the sample space of the TS probe can yield a signal characteristic of the magnetic nanoparticles. As a proof of the concept, Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with Au (mean size ~60 nm) were synthesized using a micellar method and these nanoparticles were introduced to the medium at different concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL buffer, where they were taken up by human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells via phagocytosis. While the highest concentration of Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles (1 mg/mL) was found to give the strongest TS signal, it is notable that the TS signal of the nanoparticles could still be detected at concentrations as low as 0.1 mg/mL. Full article
Open AccessArticle Enhanced Electronic Properties of Pt@Ag Heterostructured Nanoparticles
Sensors 2013, 13(6), 7813-7826; doi:10.3390/s130607813
Received: 2 May 2013 / Revised: 11 June 2013 / Accepted: 14 June 2013 / Published: 18 June 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1007 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Platinum coated by silver nanoparticles was synthesized, which displays a unique structure where polycrystalline platinum particles are completely encapsulated in continuous monocrystalline silver shells. These particles display accentuated electronic properties, where the silver shells gain electron density from the platinum cores, imparting enhanced
[...] Read more.
Platinum coated by silver nanoparticles was synthesized, which displays a unique structure where polycrystalline platinum particles are completely encapsulated in continuous monocrystalline silver shells. These particles display accentuated electronic properties, where the silver shells gain electron density from the platinum cores, imparting enhanced properties such as oxidation resistance. This electron transfer phenomenon is highly interfacial in nature, and the degree of electron transfer decreases as the thickness of silver shell increases. The nanoparticle structure and electronic properties are studied and the implication to creating sensing probes with enhanced robustness, sensitivity and controllable plasmonic properties is discussed. Full article
Open AccessArticle Simple, Fast and Selective Detection of Adenosine Triphosphate at Physiological pH Using Unmodified Gold Nanoparticles as Colorimetric Probes and Metal Ions as Cross-Linkers
Sensors 2012, 12(11), 15078-15087; doi:10.3390/s121115078
Received: 8 October 2012 / Revised: 24 October 2012 / Accepted: 2 November 2012 / Published: 6 November 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (387 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the
[...] Read more.
We report a simple, fast and selective colorimetric assay of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as probes and metal ions as cross-linkers. ATP can be assembled onto the surface of AuNPs through interaction between the electron-rich nitrogen atoms and the electron-deficient surface of AuNPs. Accordingly, Cu2+ ions induce a change in the color and UV/Vis absorbance of AuNPs by coordinating to the triphosphate groups and a ring nitrogen of ATP. A detection limit of 50 nM was achieved, which is comparable to or lower than that achievable by the currently used electrochemical, spectroscopic or chromatographic methods. The theoretical simplicity and high selectivity reported herein demonstrated that AuNPs-based colorimetric assay could be applied in a wide variety of fields by rationally designing the surface chemistry of AuNPs. In addition, our results indicate that ATP-modified AuNPs are less stable in Cu2+, Cd2+ or Zn2+-containing solutions due to the formation of the corresponding dimeric metal-ATP complexes. Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Sensors Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
sensors@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Sensors
Back to Top