Special Issue "Layered Double Hydroxide Used in Drug Delivery"

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A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (19 December 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dermot O’Hare

Chemistry Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX13TA, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: layered double hydroxides; intercalation; in-situ diffraction; materials; organometallic; catalysis
Guest Editor
Dr. Gareth R. Williams

UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29 - 39 Brunswick Square, London WC1N 1AX, UK
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +44 207 753 5942
Interests: drug delivery; formulation; electrospinning; layered metal hydroxides; adjuvants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

The anion exchange capability of layered double hydroxides (LDHs), coupled with the ability of many active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to form anions, has resulted in an explosion of interest in using LDHs for drug delivery applications. A search in Google Scholar for “layered double hydroxides AND drug delivery” results in some 21,500 hits, clearly demonstrating the research effort underway in this area. The Special Issue of Pharmaceutics on “Layered double hydroxides in drug delivery” will address all areas of pharmaceutics where LDHs have been explored, from their use as controlled or targeted release formulations (either alone or in combination with other excipients) through to their applications in DNA or RNA delivery on the sub-cellular level. Original research papers or review articles on any of these aspects are welcomed for this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Dermot O’Hare
Dr. Gareth R. Williams
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • layered double hydroxide
  • drug delivery
  • gene delivery
  • controlled release
  • targeted release
  • sustained release

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Enhanced Cellular Delivery and Biocompatibility of a Small Layered Double Hydroxide–Liposome Composite System
Pharmaceutics 2014, 6(4), 584-598; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics6040584
Received: 29 August 2014 / Revised: 10 November 2014 / Accepted: 11 November 2014 / Published: 26 November 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (3331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The various classes of gene delivery vectors possess distinct advantages and disadvantages, each of which impacts on cargo loading, delivery and, ultimately, its function. With this in mind, herein we report on a small layered double hydroxide (sLDH)–liposome composite system, drawing upon the
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The various classes of gene delivery vectors possess distinct advantages and disadvantages, each of which impacts on cargo loading, delivery and, ultimately, its function. With this in mind, herein we report on a small layered double hydroxide (sLDH)–liposome composite system, drawing upon the salient features of LDH and liposome classes of vectors, while avoiding their inherent shortfalls when used independently. sLDH–liposome composites were prepared by the hydration of freeze-dried matrix method. These composite systems, with a Z-average size of ≈200 nm, exhibited low cytotoxicity and demonstrated good suspension stability, both in water and cell culture medium after rehydration. Our studies demonstrate that short dsDNAs/ssDNAs were completely bound and protected in the composite system at an sLDH:DNA mass ratio of 20:1, regardless of the approach to DNA loading. This composite system delivered DNA to HCT-116 cells with ≈3-fold greater efficiency, when compared to sLDH alone. Our findings point towards the sLDH-liposome composite system being an effective and biocompatible gene delivery system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Layered Double Hydroxide Used in Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition
Pharmaceutics 2014, 6(3), 436-446; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics6030436
Received: 6 June 2014 / Revised: 22 July 2014 / Accepted: 23 July 2014 / Published: 30 July 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2136 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was
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The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution. However, no intercalation was achieved for sorbic acid. Although intercalation of sorbate and aspartate into chloride-type layered double hydroxide was possible, the uptakes for these intercalation compounds were lower than those obtained using nitrate-type layered double hydroxide. The intercalation under solid condition could be achieved to the same extent as for ion-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, and the reactivity was similar to that observed in aqueous solution. This method will enable the encapsulation of acidic drug in layered double hydroxide as nano level simply by mixing both solids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Layered Double Hydroxide Used in Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle Influence of Hydrothermal Treatment on Physicochemical Properties and Drug Release of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs of Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoparticles
Pharmaceutics 2014, 6(2), 235-248; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics6020235
Received: 3 April 2014 / Revised: 8 May 2014 / Accepted: 9 May 2014 / Published: 22 May 2014
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (926 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The synthesis method of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) determines nanoparticles’ performance in biomedical applications. In this study, hydrothermal treatment as an important synthesis technique has been examined for its influence on the physicochemical properties and the drug release rate from drug-containing LDHs. We
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The synthesis method of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) determines nanoparticles’ performance in biomedical applications. In this study, hydrothermal treatment as an important synthesis technique has been examined for its influence on the physicochemical properties and the drug release rate from drug-containing LDHs. We synthesised MgAl–LDHs intercalated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (i.e., naproxen, diclofenac and ibuprofen) using a co-precipitation method with or without hydrothermal treatment (150 °C, 4 h). After being hydrothermally treated, LDH–drug crystallites increased in particle size and crystallinity, but did not change in the interlayer anion orientation, gallery height and chemical composition. The drug release patterns of all studied LDH–drug hybrids were biphasic and sustained. LDHs loaded with diclofenac had a quicker drug release rate compared with those with naproxen and ibuprofen, and the drug release from the hydrothermally-treated LDH–drug was slower than the freshly precipitated LDH–drug. These results suggest that the drug release of LDH–drugs is influenced by the crystallite size of LDHs, which can be controlled by hydrothermal treatment, as well as by the drug molecular physicochemical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Layered Double Hydroxide Used in Drug Delivery)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Layered Double Hydroxide-Based Nanocarriers for Drug Delivery
Pharmaceutics 2014, 6(2), 298-332; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics6020298
Received: 11 April 2014 / Revised: 15 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 17 June 2014
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (2325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS). In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize
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Biocompatible clay materials have attracted particular attention as the efficient drug delivery systems (DDS). In this article, we review developments in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for controlled drug release and delivery. We show how advances in the ability to synthesize intercalated structures have a significant influence on the development of new applications of these materials. We also show how modification and/or functionalization can lead to new biotechnological and biomedical applications. This review highlights the most recent progresses in research on LDH-based controlled drug delivery systems, focusing mainly on: (i) DDS with cardiovascular drugs as guests; (ii) DDS with anti-inflammatory drugs as guests; and (iii) DDS with anti-cancer drugs as guests. Finally, future prospects for LDH-based drug carriers are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Layered Double Hydroxide Used in Drug Delivery)
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