Special Issue "Functional Nanohybrids for Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Shang-Hsiu Hu

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +886-3-57131175
Interests: Drug delivery, Cancer therapy, Nanoparticles, Functional materials, Triggered release
Guest Editor
Prof. Chien-Wen Chang

Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Drug delivery, Gene delivery, Light-triggered drug release, Stem cells & Tissue Engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems have been seen as a publicly-known strategy to improve therapeutic efficacy in cancer therapies. However, dense extracellular matrix and interstitial fluid pressure in the tumor suppress deep delivery and lead to inhomogeneous treatments. Not only able to accumulate at highly permeable peripheral blood vessels via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects, nanohybrids should also be concerned with different functions to enhance drug delivery. Stimuli-response and functions of nanohybrids are two impressive manipulations for enhanced drug delivery. In addition, targeting moiety for specific diseases also shelters the mononuclear phagocyte system and promotes enhanced delivery. Therefore, after drug injection, obstacles from blood circulation, tumor accumulation, and penetrated delivery should be comprehensively considered, and thus multifunctional nanohybrids will be the ideal platforms for enhanced drug delivery. The development of new nanohybrids represents an important step in the field of drug delivery systems.

This Special Issue has the aim of highlighting current progress in the use of the multifunctional nanohybrids for enhanced drug delivery.

Prof. Shang-Hsiu Hu
Prof. Chien-Wen Chang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Drug delivery
  • Cancer therapy
  • Nanoparticles
  • Functional materials
  • Triggered release

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Magnetic Nanoparticles Conjugated with Peptides Derived from Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 as a Tool for Targeting Atherosclerosis
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(2), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10020062
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 21 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
PDF Full-text (6553 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that may progress silently for long period, and it is also widely accepted as the main cause of cardiovascular diseases. To prevent atherosclerotic plaques from generating, imaging early molecular markers and quantifying the extent of disease progression
[...] Read more.
Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial inflammatory disease that may progress silently for long period, and it is also widely accepted as the main cause of cardiovascular diseases. To prevent atherosclerotic plaques from generating, imaging early molecular markers and quantifying the extent of disease progression are desired. During inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into incipient lipid accumulation in the artery wall, following conditioning by local growth factors and proinflammatory cytokines; therefore, monocyte accumulation in the arterial wall can be observed in fatty streaks, rupture-prone plaques, and experimental atherosclerosis. In this work, we synthesized monocyte-targeting iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), which were incorporated with the peptides derived from the chemokine receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-binding motif of monocytes chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) as a diagnostic tool for potential atherosclerosis. MCP-1-motif MNPs co-localized with monocytes in in vitro fluorescence imaging. In addition, with MNPs injection in ApoE knockout mice (ApoE KO mice), the well-characterized animal model of atherosclerosis, MNPs were found in specific organs or regions which had monocytes accumulation, especially the aorta of atherosclerosis model mice, through in vivo imaging system (IVIS) imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We also performed Oil Red O staining and Prussian Blue staining to confirm the co-localization of MCP-1-motif MNPs and atherosclerosis. The results showed the promising potential of MCP-1-motif MNPs as a diagnostic agent of atherosclerosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanohybrids for Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle Integrated Oxidized-Hyaluronic Acid/Collagen Hydrogel with β-TCP Using Proanthocyanidins as a Crosslinker for Drug Delivery
Pharmaceutics 2018, 10(2), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics10020037
Received: 1 March 2018 / Revised: 13 March 2018 / Accepted: 15 March 2018 / Published: 21 March 2018
PDF Full-text (2182 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The susceptibility of guided bone regeneration (GBR) material to infection by pathogens at wound sites during bone healing has often been overlooked. The objective of this study was the synthesis and characterization of a potential material for antibacterial GBR application. In the current
[...] Read more.
The susceptibility of guided bone regeneration (GBR) material to infection by pathogens at wound sites during bone healing has often been overlooked. The objective of this study was the synthesis and characterization of a potential material for antibacterial GBR application. In the current study, the mechanical strength and biocompatibility of a composite restoration material—made of oxidized hyaluronic acid (HA)/type I collagen hydrogel integrated with tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) using a natural crosslinking agent, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs)—were evaluated. The suitability of the material as a carrier matrix for antibacterial applications was evaluated by following the drug-release profile of tetracycline loaded within the composite. Results indicated that this composite material had a high swelling ratio of 420% and mechanical strength of 25 kPa while remaining at more than 60% of the weight after 30 days of an in vitro degradation test with good biocompatibility in promoting the proliferation of MG-63 cells. Drug release studies further showed that 93% of the tetracycline was released after 5 days, which supports this GBR material’s capability to release antibacterial drugs while keeping other required GBR material design functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanohybrids for Drug Delivery)
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Graphical abstract

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