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Special Issue "Eating Disorder and Obesity"

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A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Lynda M. Williams (Website)

Metabolic Health Group, Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, University of Aberdeen, Greenburn Road, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK
Interests: inflammation and obesity; role of dietary anti-inflammatories in improving metabolic health

Special Issue Information

Submission

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Lipid-Lowering Effects of Pediococcus acidilactici M76 Isolated from Korean Traditional Makgeolli in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice
Nutrients 2014, 6(3), 1016-1028; doi:10.3390/nu6031016
Received: 24 October 2013 / Revised: 15 February 2014 / Accepted: 26 February 2014 / Published: 7 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (513 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of Pediococcus acidilactici M76 (lactic acid bacteria) isolated from makgeolli on mice fed a high fat diet was investigated to clarify the lipid lowering function. C57BL/6J male mice were randomly divided into a normal diet (ND) group, high fat diet [...] Read more.
The effect of Pediococcus acidilactici M76 (lactic acid bacteria) isolated from makgeolli on mice fed a high fat diet was investigated to clarify the lipid lowering function. C57BL/6J male mice were randomly divided into a normal diet (ND) group, high fat diet (HD) group, HD plus Pediococcus acidilactici DSM 20284 reference strain (PR) group, and HD plus Pediococcus acidilactici M76 strain (PA) groups. The lyophilized PA and PR strain were dissolved in distilled water at a final concentration of 1.25 × 109 cfu/mL and was given orally to animals at a dose of 4 mL/kg body weight for 12 weeks. The PA group had a lower final body weight, adipose tissue weight, and lipid profile than those in the HD group. Additionally, level of ACC, FAS and PPAR-γ, a key lipid synthesis enzyme, was markedly suppressed in the PA compared to those in the HD group. These data suggest that P. acidilactici M76 may exert a lipid-lowering effect in high fat diet- induced obese mice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorder and Obesity)
Open AccessArticle Effect of Fructooligosaccharides Fraction from Psacalium decompositum on Inflammation and Dyslipidemia in Rats with Fructose-Induced Obesity
Nutrients 2014, 6(2), 591-604; doi:10.3390/nu6020591
Received: 20 October 2013 / Revised: 18 December 2013 / Accepted: 27 December 2013 / Published: 29 January 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (743 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Psacalium decompositum, commonly known as “Matarique,” is a medicinal plant used in Mexico for diabetes mellitus empirical therapy. Previous studies have shown that the fructooligosaccharides (FOS) present in the roots of this plant exhibit a notable hypoglycemic effect in animal models; [...] Read more.
Psacalium decompositum, commonly known as “Matarique,” is a medicinal plant used in Mexico for diabetes mellitus empirical therapy. Previous studies have shown that the fructooligosaccharides (FOS) present in the roots of this plant exhibit a notable hypoglycemic effect in animal models; this effect might be associated with the attenuation of the inflammatory process and other metabolic disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of FOS fraction administration in a fructose-fed rat model for obesity. Phytochemical chromatographic studies (high performance thin layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance) were performed to verify isolation of FOS. 24 male Wistar rats were maintained for 12 weeks on a diet of 20% HFCS in drinking water and chow. Glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and liver transaminases levels were measured monthly, after administering FOS fraction intragastrically (150 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks), while the levels of inflammatory cytokines were only quantified at the end of the treatments. Rats treated with FOS fraction decreased body weight, cholesterol, triglycerides, and significantly reduced IL-6, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-1β and VEGF levels (p < 0.05). These results suggest that P. decompositum has anti-inflammatory and hypolipidemic properties that might be used as an alternative treatment for the control of obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorder and Obesity)
Open AccessArticle Weight Misperception, Self-Reported Physical Fitness, Dieting and Some Psychological Variables as Risk Factors for Eating Disorders
Nutrients 2013, 5(11), 4486-4502; doi:10.3390/nu5114486
Received: 22 August 2013 / Revised: 25 October 2013 / Accepted: 29 October 2013 / Published: 13 November 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (215 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aims of the current study were to explore possible gender differences in weight misperception, self-reported physical fitness, and dieting, and to analyze the relationship between these variables and others, such as self-esteem, body appreciation, general mental health, and eating- and body [...] Read more.
The aims of the current study were to explore possible gender differences in weight misperception, self-reported physical fitness, and dieting, and to analyze the relationship between these variables and others, such as self-esteem, body appreciation, general mental health, and eating- and body image-related variables among adolescents. In addition, the specific risk for eating disorders was examined, as well as the possible clusters with respect to the risk status. The sample comprised 655 students, 313 females and 342 males, aged 16.22 ± 4.58. Different scales of perceived overweight, self-reported physical fitness and dieting together with the Body Mass Index (BMI) were considered along with instruments such as the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Body Appreciation Scale (BAS) and Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2). Since some gender differences were found with respect to these adolescent groups, it is necessary to design prevention programs that not only focus on traditional factors such as BMI or body image, but also on elements like weight perception, self-reported fitness and nutritional education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorder and Obesity)
Open AccessArticle Red-Koji Fermented Red Ginseng Ameliorates High Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Disorders in Mice
Nutrients 2013, 5(11), 4316-4332; doi:10.3390/nu5114316
Received: 28 August 2013 / Revised: 1 October 2013 / Accepted: 16 October 2013 / Published: 30 October 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1047 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fermentation of medicinal herbs improves their pharmacological efficacy. In this study, we investigated the effects of red-koji fermented red ginseng (fRG) on high-fat diet (HFD)-mediated metabolic disorders, and those effects were compared to those of non-fermented red ginseng (RG). fRG (500, 250 [...] Read more.
Fermentation of medicinal herbs improves their pharmacological efficacy. In this study, we investigated the effects of red-koji fermented red ginseng (fRG) on high-fat diet (HFD)-mediated metabolic disorders, and those effects were compared to those of non-fermented red ginseng (RG). fRG (500, 250 or 125 mg/kg), RG (250 mg/kg), simvastatin (10 mg/kg), silymarin (100 mg/kg) and metformin (250 mg/kg) were orally administered from 1 week after initiation of HFD supply for 84 days. The diameter of adipocytes in periovarian and abdominal fat pads and the thickness of the abdominal fat were significantly decreased by fRG treatment, while HFD-mediated weight gain was partly alleviated by fRG in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, biochemical and histomorphometrical analyses clearly indicated that fRG significantly inhibited HFD-induced metabolic disorders such as hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, hepatopathy and nephropathy in a dose-dependent manner. More favorable pharmacological effects on HFD-mediated metabolic disorders were also observed with fRG compared to an equal dose of RG. This finding provides direct evidence that the pharmacological activities of RG were enhanced by red-koji fermentation, and fRG could be a neutraceutical resource for the alleviation of obesity-mediated metabolic disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorder and Obesity)

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Intermittent Feeding Schedules—Behavioural Consequences and Potential Clinical Significance
Nutrients 2014, 6(3), 985-1002; doi:10.3390/nu6030985
Received: 29 November 2013 / Revised: 6 February 2014 / Accepted: 17 February 2014 / Published: 4 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (204 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food availability and associated sensory cues such as olfaction are known to trigger a range of hormonal and behavioural responses. When food availability is predictable these physiological and behavioural responses can become entrained to set times and occur in anticipation of food [...] Read more.
Food availability and associated sensory cues such as olfaction are known to trigger a range of hormonal and behavioural responses. When food availability is predictable these physiological and behavioural responses can become entrained to set times and occur in anticipation of food rather than being dependent on the food-related cues. Here we summarise the range of physiological and behavioural responses to food when the time of its availability is unpredictable, and consider the potential to manipulate feeding patterns for benefit in metabolic and mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorder and Obesity)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessCommentary Eating and Obesity—The New World Disorder
Nutrients 2013, 5(10), 4206-4210; doi:10.3390/nu5104206
Received: 21 August 2013 / Revised: 17 September 2013 / Accepted: 18 September 2013 / Published: 21 October 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (146 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Obesity is not a new phenomenon. Paleolithic artefacts, some almost 35,000 years old, depict obesity in its classical gynoid form, suggesting that early hunter-gathers were not entirely safeguarded by the assumed Stone Age diet [1]. Nevertheless it has been convincingly argued by [...] Read more.
Obesity is not a new phenomenon. Paleolithic artefacts, some almost 35,000 years old, depict obesity in its classical gynoid form, suggesting that early hunter-gathers were not entirely safeguarded by the assumed Stone Age diet [1]. Nevertheless it has been convincingly argued by Boyd Eaton and others that the 21st century epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including obesity, is attributable to mankind no longer enjoying the diet of our ancestors for which we remain genetically and metabolically programmed [2]. Even if our forebears seemed to revere obesity sufficiently to carve out stone “venuses”, it is still unclear if they were documenting a commonplace feature, although the frequency with which these venuses appear across thousands of years and even thousands of miles apart might suggest that obesity, in women at least, was not a complete rarity [3]. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorder and Obesity)

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