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Special Issue "Diet and Food as Means and Mechanisms for Anti-Inflammation Gut-Related Mechanisms in Special Interest"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Marjukka Kolehmainen

University of Eastern Finland, Institute Public Health & Clinical Nutrition, Kuopio 70211, Finland
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Interests: health effects of foods, nutrition, food induced gut function, interaction between physiological and psychological responses
Guest Editor
Dr. Kati Hanhineva

Academy Research Fellow, University of Eastern Finland, Finland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food and nutritional metabolomics; LC-MS based metabolic profiling approaches; development of data-analytical procedures for metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent findings related to dietary effects on gut and microbiota function and their relation to inflammation are generating even more research interest in this combination of diet-gut function-inflammation. New nutritional research methods open new possibilities in the investigation of this combination and underlying mechanisms of action. The link between food-related metabolites and their responses in our physiology and psychology, mediated by gut- and microbiota-related metabolism, is very complicated, but also a very interesting and active research area.

Thus, we would like to invite studies investigating diets and foods as an active participant in inflammation—both in anti-inflammatory and inflammatory function. In addition, we encourage submissions of studies investigating microbiota as the mediating factor and mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of food/diet. Metabolomics methodology may offer new answers or a new hypothesis to study this area further.

We hope you find this opportunity of interest; if so, please submit your work by July 2018 to our Special Issue: Diet and Food as Means and Mechanisms for Anti-Inflammation Gut-Related Mechanisms in Special Interest.

Prof. Marjukka Kolehmainen
Dr. Kati Hanhineva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Food
  • Anti-Inflammation
  • Metabolomics
  • Gut barrier
  • Gut microbiome
  • Mechanisms

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview Factors Affecting Gastrointestinal Microbiome Development in Neonates
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030274
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
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Abstract
The gut microbiome is established in the newborn period and is recognised to interact with the host to influence metabolism. Different environmental factors that are encountered during this critical period may influence the gut microbial composition, potentially impacting upon later disease risk, such
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The gut microbiome is established in the newborn period and is recognised to interact with the host to influence metabolism. Different environmental factors that are encountered during this critical period may influence the gut microbial composition, potentially impacting upon later disease risk, such as asthma, metabolic disorder, and inflammatory bowel disease. The sterility dogma of the foetus in utero is challenged by studies that identified bacteria, bacterial DNA, or bacterial products in meconium, amniotic fluid, and the placenta; indicating the initiation of maternal-to-offspring microbial colonisation in utero. This narrative review aims to provide a better understanding of factors that affect the development of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome during prenatal, perinatal to postnatal life, and their reciprocal relationship with GI tract development in neonates. Full article
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