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Special Issue "Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Marjukka Kolehmainen

University of Eastern Finland, Institute Public Health & Clinical Nutrition, Kuopio 70211, Finland
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Interests: health effects of foods, nutrition, food induced gut function, interaction between physiological and psychological responses
Guest Editor
Dr. Kati Hanhineva

Academy Research Fellow, University of Eastern Finland, Finland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food and nutritional metabolomics; LC-MS based metabolic profiling approaches; development of data-analytical procedures for metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent findings related to dietary effects on gut and microbiota function and their relation to inflammation are generating even more research interest in this combination of diet-gut function-inflammation. New nutritional research methods open new possibilities in the investigation of this combination and underlying mechanisms of action. The link between food-related metabolites and their responses in our physiology and psychology, mediated by gut- and microbiota-related metabolism, is very complicated, but also a very interesting and active research area.

Thus, we would like to invite studies investigating diets and foods as an active participant in inflammation—both in anti-inflammatory and inflammatory function. In addition, we encourage submissions of studies investigating microbiota as the mediating factor and mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of food/diet. Metabolomics methodology may offer new answers or a new hypothesis to study this area further.

We hope you find this opportunity of interest; if so, please submit your work by July 2018 to our Special Issue: Diet and Food as Means and Mechanisms for Anti-Inflammation Gut-Related Mechanisms in Special Interest.

Prof. Marjukka Kolehmainen
Dr. Kati Hanhineva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Food
  • Anti-Inflammation
  • Metabolomics
  • Gut barrier
  • Gut microbiome
  • Mechanisms

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Increased Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor 10.5 h after Intake of Whole Grain Rye-Based Products in Healthy Subjects
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1097; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081097
Received: 6 July 2018 / Revised: 9 August 2018 / Accepted: 14 August 2018 / Published: 16 August 2018
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Abstract
It has previously been shown in short-term interventions that kernel-based whole grain (WG) rye products have beneficial effects on test markers related to obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D increases the risk of several severe health issues, including declined cognitive functions. The
[...] Read more.
It has previously been shown in short-term interventions that kernel-based whole grain (WG) rye products have beneficial effects on test markers related to obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D increases the risk of several severe health issues, including declined cognitive functions. The protein brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is suggested to be a potential biomarker for neuronal integrity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect on plasma BDNF concentrations, 10.5 h after the intake of WG rye. Healthy young adults were provided late evening meals consisting of WG rye kernel-based bread (RKB) or a white wheat flour-based bread (reference product (WWB)), in a randomized cross-over design. The BDNF concentrations were investigated at fasting in the morning 10.5 h after single evening meals with RKB and WWB, and also after three consecutive evening meals with RKB and WWB, respectively. No difference was observed in the BDNF concentrations depending on the priming setting (p > 0.05). The RKB evening meals increased the BDNF concentrations by 27% at fasting (p = 0.001), compared to WWB. The increase of BDNF after the RKB indicate that, in addition to anti-diabetic properties, the dietary fiber in WG rye may support neuronal integrity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation)
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Open AccessArticle Protective Effect of Pure Sour Cherry Anthocyanin Extract on Cytokine-Induced Inflammatory Caco-2 Monolayers
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070861
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 29 June 2018 / Published: 3 July 2018
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Abstract
Anthocyanins have several beneficial effects, especially on inflammatory and oxidative conditions. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), induce damage in the intestinal barrier and participate in the pathogenesis of chronic bowel diseases. A number of fruits have high anthocyanin
[...] Read more.
Anthocyanins have several beneficial effects, especially on inflammatory and oxidative conditions. The pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), induce damage in the intestinal barrier and participate in the pathogenesis of chronic bowel diseases. A number of fruits have high anthocyanin contents with strong biological activity which can support protective actions. Sour cherry (Prunus cerassus) is one of the richest fruits in anthocyanins; especially it has high content of cyanidins. The aim of this study was to test the biological effects of a pure sour cherry anthocyanin extract under inflammatory conditions on the intestinal barrier. Caco-2 monolayers were stimulated with 50 ng/mL TNF-α and 25 ng/mL IL-1β, and the protective effects of the anthocyanin extract were examined. We demonstrated the safety of 500, 50, 5 and 0.5 µM anthocyanin extracts through cell impedance measurements. The 50 µM anthocyanin extract inhibited the cytokine-induced Caco-2 permeability and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunits. The extract significantly reduced the release of IL-6 and IL-8 production in intestinal cells and glutathione peroxidase activity stimulated by cytokines. We demonstrated, for the first time, the beneficial effects of pure sour cherry anthocyanin extract on inflammatory Caco-2 monolayers, indicating that this substance could be protective in inflammatory bowel diseases and is an excellent raw material for further applications and formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation)
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Review

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Open AccessReview The Potential of Gut Commensals in Reinforcing Intestinal Barrier Function and Alleviating Inflammation
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 988; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10080988
Received: 1 July 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 29 July 2018
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Abstract
The intestinal microbiota, composed of pro- and anti-inflammatory microbes, has an essential role in maintaining gut homeostasis and functionality. An overly hygienic lifestyle, consumption of processed and fiber-poor foods, or antibiotics are major factors modulating the microbiota and possibly leading to longstanding dysbiosis.
[...] Read more.
The intestinal microbiota, composed of pro- and anti-inflammatory microbes, has an essential role in maintaining gut homeostasis and functionality. An overly hygienic lifestyle, consumption of processed and fiber-poor foods, or antibiotics are major factors modulating the microbiota and possibly leading to longstanding dysbiosis. Dysbiotic microbiota is characterized to have altered composition, reduced diversity and stability, as well as increased levels of lipopolysaccharide-containing, proinflammatory bacteria. Specific commensal species as novel probiotics, so-called next-generation probiotics, could restore the intestinal health by means of attenuating inflammation and strengthening the epithelial barrier. In this review we summarize the latest findings considering the beneficial effects of the promising commensals across all major intestinal phyla. These include the already well-known bifidobacteria, which use extracellular structures or secreted substances to promote intestinal health. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Roseburia intestinalis, and Eubacterium hallii metabolize dietary fibers as major short-chain fatty acid producers providing energy sources for enterocytes and achieving anti-inflammatory effects in the gut. Akkermansia muciniphila exerts beneficial action in metabolic diseases and fortifies the barrier function. The health-promoting effects of Bacteroides species are relatively recently discovered with the findings of excreted immunomodulatory molecules. These promising, unconventional probiotics could be a part of biotherapeutic strategies in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview Factors Affecting Gastrointestinal Microbiome Development in Neonates
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 274; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030274
Received: 13 February 2018 / Revised: 20 February 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (981 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The gut microbiome is established in the newborn period and is recognised to interact with the host to influence metabolism. Different environmental factors that are encountered during this critical period may influence the gut microbial composition, potentially impacting upon later disease risk, such
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The gut microbiome is established in the newborn period and is recognised to interact with the host to influence metabolism. Different environmental factors that are encountered during this critical period may influence the gut microbial composition, potentially impacting upon later disease risk, such as asthma, metabolic disorder, and inflammatory bowel disease. The sterility dogma of the foetus in utero is challenged by studies that identified bacteria, bacterial DNA, or bacterial products in meconium, amniotic fluid, and the placenta; indicating the initiation of maternal-to-offspring microbial colonisation in utero. This narrative review aims to provide a better understanding of factors that affect the development of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome during prenatal, perinatal to postnatal life, and their reciprocal relationship with GI tract development in neonates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation)
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