Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ping-Shan Lai

Department of Chemistry, Ph.D. Program in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Research Center for Sustainable Energy and Nanotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan
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Interests: biomaterials; drug delivery; nanomedicine; cancer therapy; smart materials
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Akihiro Kishimura

Department of Applied Chemistry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
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Interests: materials chemistry; nanobiotechnology; biomaterials; nanofabrication; polymer chemistry; supramolecular chemistry
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mu-Ping Nieh

Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, CT, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: bicellar nanodiscs; nanovesicles; bilayered ribbons; nanocarriers; strung lipid-based nanoparticles; high-sensitivity biosensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are launching a Special Issue in Nanomaterials (IF: 3.553) entitled “Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy”. The utilization of nanomaterials in technologies for biomedical applications continues to represent an important area of academic and commercial research. There are numerous strategies by which the integration of nanomaterials can improve therapeutic or diagnostic/imaging performance. In addition, the advanced fundamental understanding of interactions among biological molecules, immune response and nanomaterials is critical for the development of future medicine. Thus, this special issue aims to cover a broad range of subjects from nanomaterials synthesis to the design and characterization of biomaterials for drug delivery, imaging/diagnosis or therapy of diseases. Development of novel biotechnologies or strategies with high safety against cancer will be given priority. The format of welcomed articles includes full papers, communications and reviews. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  1. Nanomaterials synthesis and development for drug delivery.
  2. Synthesis and development of nanomaterials for cancer theranostics
  3. Nanochips, nanofluidics and nanofabrication for diagnosis or disease screening.
  4. Design and preparation of hybrid biomaterials or nanocomposites for drug implant.
  5. Contrast agents and biomedical imaging technologies for diagnosis.
  6. Drug conjugation or immobilization technologies for bioconjugates development.
  7. In vivo monitoring of nanocarriers and drug release/accumulation profile in target site.
  8. Effects of particles size, morphology and surface properties on biodistribution.
  9. Nanomaterials for regenerative medicine
  10. Development of nanomaterials for bioanalysis.

Prof. Dr. Ping-Shan Lai
Prof. Dr. Akihiro Kishimura
Prof. Dr. Mu-Ping Nieh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanocarrier
  • Drug delivery
  • Controlled release
  • Bioconjugation
  • Contrast agents
  • Biomedical imaging
  • Biosensing and bioanalysis
  • Theranostics
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Biomaterials

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Mechanisms of Cellular Internalization of Quantum Dot® Conjugated Bone Formation Mimetic Peptide CK2.3
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(7), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8070513
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
PDF Full-text (4781 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Osteoporosis is a debilitating skeletal disorder that is characterized by loss of bone density
over time. It affects one in two women and one in four men, age 50 and older. New treatments
that specifically drive bone formation are desperately needed. We developed
[...] Read more.
Osteoporosis is a debilitating skeletal disorder that is characterized by loss of bone density
over time. It affects one in two women and one in four men, age 50 and older. New treatments
that specifically drive bone formation are desperately needed. We developed a peptide, CK2.3, that
acts downstream of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type Ia and it induces osteogenesis
in-vitro and in-vivo. However, its mechanism of action, especially its mode of uptake by cells
remains unknown. To demonstrate CK2.3 internalization within a cell, we conjugated CK2.3
to Quantum Dot®s (Qdot®s), semiconductor nanoparticles. We purified CK2.3-Qdot®s by size
exclusion chromatography and verified the conjugation and stability using UV/VIS and Fourier
transform infrared spectroscopy. Our results show that CK2.3 was conjugated to the Qdot®s and
the conjugate was stable for at least 4 days at 37 °C. Moreover, CK2.3-Qdot®s exerted biological
response similar to CK2.3. Addition of CK2.3-Qdot®s to cells followed by confocal imaging revealed
that CK2.3-Qdot®s were internalized at 6 h post stimulation. Furthermore, using pharmacological
inhibitors against endocytic pathways, we demonstrated that CK2.3-Qdot®s were internalized by
caveolae. These results show for the first time that the novel peptide CK2.3 is taken up by the cell
through caveolae mediated endocytosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Enhanced Antitumor Effects of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targetable Cetuximab-Conjugated Polymeric Micelles for Photodynamic Therapy
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(2), 121; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8020121
Received: 28 November 2017 / Revised: 30 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 January 2018 / Published: 22 February 2018
PDF Full-text (3306 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nanocarrier-based delivery systems are promising strategies for enhanced therapeutic efficacy and safety of toxic drugs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT)—a light-triggered chemical reaction that generates localized tissue damage for disease treatments—usually has side effects, and thus patients receiving photosensitizers should be kept away from direct
[...] Read more.
Nanocarrier-based delivery systems are promising strategies for enhanced therapeutic efficacy and safety of toxic drugs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT)—a light-triggered chemical reaction that generates localized tissue damage for disease treatments—usually has side effects, and thus patients receiving photosensitizers should be kept away from direct light to avoid skin phototoxicity. In this study, a clinically therapeutic antibody cetuximab (C225) was conjugated to the surface of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactide) (mPEG-b-PLA) micelles via thiol-maleimide coupling to allow tumor-targetable chlorin e6 (Ce6) delivery. Our results demonstrate that more C225-conjugated Ce6-loaded polymeric micelles (C225-Ce6/PM) were selectively taken up than Ce6/PM or IgG conjugated Ce6/PM by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-overexpressing A431 cells observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), thereby decreasing the IC50 value of Ce6-mediated PDT from 0.42 to 0.173 μM. No significant differences were observed in cellular uptake study or IC50 value between C225-Ce6/PM and Ce6/PM groups in lower EGFR expression HT-29 cells. For antitumor study, the tumor volumes in the C225-Ce6/PM-PDT group (percentage of tumor growth inhibition, TGI% = 84.8) were significantly smaller than those in the Ce6-PDT (TGI% = 38.4) and Ce6/PM-PDT groups (TGI% = 53.3) (p < 0.05) at day 21 through reduced cell proliferation in A431 xenografted mice. These results indicated that active EGFR targeting of photosensitizer-loaded micelles provides a possible way to resolve the dose-limiting toxicity of conventional photosensitizers and represents a potential delivery system for PDT in a clinical setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Polymeric Micelle of A3B-Type Lactosome as a Vehicle for Targeting Meningeal Dissemination
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(2), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8020079
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
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Abstract
Polymeric micelle of the A3B-type lactosome comprising (poly(sarcosine))3-b-poly(l-lactic acid) was labeled with 111In. The 111In-labeled A3B-type lactosome was administered to the model mice bearing meningeal dissemination and bone metastasis at mandible.
[...] Read more.
Polymeric micelle of the A3B-type lactosome comprising (poly(sarcosine))3-b-poly(l-lactic acid) was labeled with 111In. The 111In-labeled A3B-type lactosome was administered to the model mice bearing meningeal dissemination and bone metastasis at mandible. With single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging, the meningeal dissemination was identified successfully by 111In-labeled A3B-type lactosome, which was superior to 201TlCl in regard of the imaging contrast. The 111In-labeled A3B-type lactosome was also potential in imaging selectively of bone metastasis at mandible, whilst a nonspecific imaging of the whole bone was obtained by the SPECT imaging using 99mTc-HMDP. The polymeric micelle of the A3B-type lactosome was therefore found to be effective as a vehicle of 111In to be targeted to meningeal dissemination and bone metastasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Experimental Comparison of Photothermal Conversion Efficiency of Gold Nanotriangle and Nanorod in Laser Induced Thermal Therapy
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(12), 416; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7120416
Received: 3 November 2017 / Revised: 16 November 2017 / Accepted: 22 November 2017 / Published: 26 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5024 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An experimental comparison of the photothermal conversion efficiency (PCE) for gold nanotriangles (GNTs) and nanorods (GNRs) was carried out in the present work. The discrete dipole approximation method was applied to identify the spectral characteristic of GNTs and GNRs with different aspect ratios.
[...] Read more.
An experimental comparison of the photothermal conversion efficiency (PCE) for gold nanotriangles (GNTs) and nanorods (GNRs) was carried out in the present work. The discrete dipole approximation method was applied to identify the spectral characteristic of GNTs and GNRs with different aspect ratios. On this basis, the PCE of GNTs and GNRs in photothermal therapy were compared theoretically. Afterwards, an in vitro experiment was adopted to investigate the thermal effect of porcine muscle induced by laser irradiation, with and without injected GNTs and GNRs. The influences of laser total power, nanoparticle concentration, and nanoparticle type were investigated. It was found that for the commonly-used wavelengths for photothermal therapy, the PCE of GNTs is higher than that of the GNRs. Furthermore, for GNRs loaded in tissue in vitro, high laser power and high concentration of nanoparticles leads to the degeneration and even carbonization of tissue. However, for the GNTs with the same situation (laser power, nanoparticle volume concentration, and heating time), it could lead to the tissue’s evaporation instead of carbonization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of the Ability of Nanostructured PEI-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to Incorporate Cisplatin during Synthesis
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano7100314
Received: 25 August 2017 / Revised: 26 September 2017 / Accepted: 5 October 2017 / Published: 12 October 2017
PDF Full-text (6553 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nanoparticles (NPs) have a high potential for biological applications as they can be used as carriers for the controlled release of bioactive factors. Here we focused on poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-coated iron oxide hybrid NPs obtained by hydrothermal synthesis in high pressure conditions and evaluated
[...] Read more.
Nanoparticles (NPs) have a high potential for biological applications as they can be used as carriers for the controlled release of bioactive factors. Here we focused on poly(ethylenimine) (PEI)-coated iron oxide hybrid NPs obtained by hydrothermal synthesis in high pressure conditions and evaluated their behavior in culture medium in the presence or absence of cells, as well as their ability to incorporate antitumor drug cisplatin. Our results showed that the hydrothermal conditions used for Fe-PEI NPs synthesis allowed the incorporation of cisplatin, which even increased its anti-tumor effects. Furthermore, the commonly occurring phenomenon of NPs aggregation in culture medium was exploited for further entrapment of other active molecules, such as the fluorescent dye DiI and valinomycin. The molecules bound to NPs during synthesis or during aggregation process were delivered inside various cells after in vitro and in vivo direct contact between cells and NPs and their biological activity was preserved, thus supporting the therapeutic value of Fe-PEI NPs as drug delivery tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Strategies on Nanodiagnostics and Nanotherapies of the Three Common Cancers
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(4), 202; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8040202
Received: 18 February 2018 / Revised: 18 March 2018 / Accepted: 23 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
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Abstract
The emergence of nanomedicine has enriched the knowledge and strategies of treating diseases, and especially some incurable diseases, such as cancers, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and neurodegenerative diseases. The application of nanoparticles in medicine is in the core of nanomedicine. Nanoparticles can
[...] Read more.
The emergence of nanomedicine has enriched the knowledge and strategies of treating diseases, and especially some incurable diseases, such as cancers, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and neurodegenerative diseases. The application of nanoparticles in medicine is in the core of nanomedicine. Nanoparticles can be used in drug delivery for improving the uptake of poorly soluble drugs, targeted delivery to a specific site, and drug bioavailability. Early diagnosis of and targeted therapies for cancers can significantly improve patients’ quality of life and extend patients’ lives. The advantages of nanoparticles have given them a progressively important role in the nanodiagnosis and nanotherapy of common cancers. To provide a reference for the further application of nanoparticles, this review focuses on the recent development and application of nanoparticles in the early diagnosis and treatment of the three common cancers (lung cancer, liver cancer, and breast cancer) by using quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Open AccessReview Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of C-Reactive Protein
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(4), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8040200
Received: 5 March 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 26 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
PDF Full-text (98633 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
C-reactive protein (CRP) is a very important biomarker of infection and inflammation for a number of diseases. Routine CRP measurements with high sensitivity and reliability are highly relevant to the assessment of states of inflammation and the efficacy of treatment intervention, and require
[...] Read more.
C-reactive protein (CRP) is a very important biomarker of infection and inflammation for a number of diseases. Routine CRP measurements with high sensitivity and reliability are highly relevant to the assessment of states of inflammation and the efficacy of treatment intervention, and require the development of very sensitive, selective, fast, robust and reproducible assays. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are distinguished for their unique electrical and optical properties and the ability to conjugate with biomolecules. Au NP-based probes have attracted considerable attention in the last decade in the analysis of biological samples due to their simplicity, high sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, this article aims to be a critical and constructive analysis of the literature of the last three years regarding the advances made in the development of bioanalytical assays based on gold nanoparticles for the in vitro detection and quantification of C-reactive protein from biological samples. Current methods for Au NP synthesis and the strategies for surface modification aiming at selectivity towards CRP are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessCommentary Paper-Based Microfluidic Platforms for Understanding the Role of Exosomes in the Pathogenesis of Major Blindness-Threatening Diseases
Nanomaterials 2018, 8(5), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano8050310
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 28 April 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
PDF Full-text (5157 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Emerging roles of exosomes in the pathogenesis of major blindness-threatening diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and corneal dystrophy, were discovered by aqueous humor analysis. A new diagnostic method using cellulose-based devices and microfluidic chip techniques for the isolation of exosomes from
[...] Read more.
Emerging roles of exosomes in the pathogenesis of major blindness-threatening diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and corneal dystrophy, were discovered by aqueous humor analysis. A new diagnostic method using cellulose-based devices and microfluidic chip techniques for the isolation of exosomes from aqueous humor is less cumbersome and saves time. This method will enable more investigations for aqueous humor analysis in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Imaging, Diagnosis or Therapy)
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