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Special Issue "Interlocked Molecules, Molecular Machines, Motors and Muscles"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Frédéric Coutrot

Institut des Biomolécules Max Mousseron (IBMM), Supramolecular Machines and Architectures Team, UMR 5247 CNRS — Université de Montpellier — ENSCM, case courrier 1706, Bâtiment Chimie (17), 3ème étage, Faculté des Sciences, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular machines, molecular muscles, interlocked molecules, rotaxanes, lasso, double-lasso, glycorotaxanes, peptides, template driven reaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Nobel Prize for Chemistry, 2016, awarded to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, James Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Lucas Feringa, has contributed to highlighting the research field of molecular machines. Despite the numerous appealing and very sophisticated examples of biomolecular machines that one can find in nature, and which are essential for life, synthetic laboratory-made molecular machines are still in their infancy. Since the first interlocked molecular machine was described in 1994, numerous systems of stimuli-responsive molecular machinery and motors have been reported around the world. The possibility to change, with control, the properties of a molecule, depending on the machinery, confers growing interest for these intriguing molecules in a wide range of fields, such as nanomaterials or biology.

This Special Issue aims at covering the field of interlocked molecules, molecular machines, motors, and muscles. Researchers in these fields are, therefore, warmly invited to propose relevant state-of-the-art reviews, perspectives, and research papers to be published in this Special Issue of Molecules.

Dr. Frédéric Coutrot
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • molecular machine
  • molecular motor
  • molecular muscle
  • molecular shuttle
  • molecular switch
  • molecular device
  • interlocked molecule
  • templated reaction
  • molecular station

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Electrochemically Triggered Co-Conformational Switching in a [2]catenane Comprising a Non-Symmetric Calix[6]arene Wheel and a Two-Station Oriented Macrocycle
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 1156; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23051156
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 8 May 2018 / Published: 11 May 2018
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Abstract
Catenanes with desymmetrized ring components can undergo co-conformational rearrangements upon external stimulation and can form the basis for the development of molecular rotary motors. We describe the design, synthesis and properties of a [2]catenane consisting of a macrocycle—the ‘track’ ring—endowed with two distinct
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Catenanes with desymmetrized ring components can undergo co-conformational rearrangements upon external stimulation and can form the basis for the development of molecular rotary motors. We describe the design, synthesis and properties of a [2]catenane consisting of a macrocycle—the ‘track’ ring—endowed with two distinct recognition sites (a bipyridinium and an ammonium) for a calix[6]arene—the ‘shuttle’ ring. By exploiting the ability of the calixarene to thread appropriate non-symmetric axles with directional selectivity, we assembled an oriented pseudorotaxane and converted it into the corresponding oriented catenane by intramolecular ring closing metathesis. Cyclic voltammetric experiments indicate that the calixarene wheel initially surrounds the bipyridinium site, moves away from it when it is reduced, and returns in the original position upon reoxidation. A comparison with appropriate model compounds shows that the presence of the ammonium station is necessary for the calixarene to leave the reduced bipyridinium site. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interlocked Molecules, Molecular Machines, Motors and Muscles)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Synthesis and Guest Recognition of Switchable Pt-Salphen Based Molecular Tweezers
Molecules 2018, 23(5), 990; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23050990
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 18 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
Molecular tweezers are artificial receptors that have an open cavity generated by two recognition units pre-organized by a spacer. Switchable molecular tweezers, using a stimuli-responsive spacer, are particularly appealing as prototypes of the molecular machines that combine mechanical motion and allosteric recognition properties.
[...] Read more.
Molecular tweezers are artificial receptors that have an open cavity generated by two recognition units pre-organized by a spacer. Switchable molecular tweezers, using a stimuli-responsive spacer, are particularly appealing as prototypes of the molecular machines that combine mechanical motion and allosteric recognition properties. In this present study, the synthesis of switchable molecular tweezers composed of a central terpyridine unit substituted in 4,4″ positions by two Pt(II)-salphen complexes is reported. The terpyridine ligand can be reversibly converted upon Zn(II) coordination from a free ‘U’-shaped closed form to a coordinated ‘W’ open form. This new substitution pattern enables a reverse control of the mechanical motion compared to the previously reported 6,6″ substituted terpyridine-based tweezers. Guest binding studies with aromatic guests showed an intercalation of coronene in the cavity created by the Pt-salphen moieties in the closed conformation. The formation of 1:1 host-guest complex was investigated by a combination of NMR studies and DFT calculations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interlocked Molecules, Molecular Machines, Motors and Muscles)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle How Secondary and Tertiary Amide Moieties are Molecular Stations for Dibenzo-24-crown-8 in [2]Rotaxane Molecular Shuttles?
Molecules 2017, 22(11), 2017; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules22112017
Received: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 17 November 2017 / Published: 21 November 2017
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Abstract
Interlocked molecular machines like [2]rotaxanes are intriguing aesthetic molecules. The control of the localization of the macrocycle, which surrounds a molecular axle, along the thread leads to translational isomers of very different properties. Although many moieties have been used as sites of interactions
[...] Read more.
Interlocked molecular machines like [2]rotaxanes are intriguing aesthetic molecules. The control of the localization of the macrocycle, which surrounds a molecular axle, along the thread leads to translational isomers of very different properties. Although many moieties have been used as sites of interactions for crown ethers, the very straightforwardly obtained amide motif has more rarely been envisaged as molecular station. In this article, we report the use of secondary and tertiary amide moieties as efficient secondary molecular station in pH-sensitive molecular shuttles. Depending on the N-substitution of the amide station, and on deprotonation or deprotonation-carbamoylation, the actuation of the molecular machinery differs accordingly to very distinct interactions between the axle and the DB24C8. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interlocked Molecules, Molecular Machines, Motors and Muscles)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview From the Synthesis of Nanovehicles to Participation in the First Nanocar Race—View from the French Team
Molecules 2018, 23(3), 612; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23030612
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 26 February 2018 / Accepted: 28 February 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
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Abstract
This review article presents our accomplished work on the synthesis of molecular triptycene wheels and their introduction into nanovehicles such as wheelbarrows and nanocars, equipped with two and four wheels, respectively. The architecture of nanovehicles is based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which provide
[...] Read more.
This review article presents our accomplished work on the synthesis of molecular triptycene wheels and their introduction into nanovehicles such as wheelbarrows and nanocars, equipped with two and four wheels, respectively. The architecture of nanovehicles is based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which provide a potential cargo zone. Our strategy allowed us to obtain planar or curved nanocars, exhibiting different mobilities on metallic surfaces. Our curved nanocar participated in the first nanocar race organized in Toulouse (France) on 28 and 29 April 2017. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interlocked Molecules, Molecular Machines, Motors and Muscles)
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