Special Issue "Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Raman Singh

Departments of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne Vic 3800, Australia
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Interests: role of nano-/microstructure in corrosion/oxidation; stress corrosion cracking; graphene: a disruptive approach to corrosion mitigation and other applications; materials degradation in civil engineering applications and their advanced mitigation; environment-assisted degradation in various industrial systems; corrosion and assisted-cracking of magnesium alloys; failure analysis of metallic industrial components, surface and sub-surface characterization of corrosion; role of nano-/microstructure in materials/corrosion; microbiologically-induced corrosion and cracking
Guest Editor
Dr. Vijayaraghavan Venkatesh

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
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Guest Editor
Dr. Vinod Kumar

Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, India
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnesium alloys, given their high strength-to-weight ratio, are very attractive materials for applications, such as aerospace and automotive components. They have also been used as nuclear fuel cladding. However, magnesium alloys have not found widespread application, particularly in the corrosive environment, because of their unacceptably rapid corrosions. Thus, there is a great commercial value in finding measures for durable corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. It may be intriguing that, because of the susceptibility of magnesium to corrosion, and the corrosion products of magnesium being non-toxic, there has been recent and increasing interest in these alloys for manufacturing biodegradable temporary implants (e.g., plates, screws, wires, etc.). A success in use of magnesium alloy implants could, altogether, avoid the need of a second surgery that is required when temporary implants are constructed out of traditional materials, such as titanium alloys. With this background of such advanced, as well as traditional, interest in mechanism and mitigation of corrosion of magnesium alloys, this Special Issue invites contributions from academia, researchers, industry professionals and engineers on the following aspects:
•    Corrosion mechanics of magnesium alloys
•    Measures for mitigation of corrosion of magnesium alloys
•    Corrosion-assisted fracture of magnesium alloys
•    Application of magnesium alloys including in novel fields, such as bioimplants

Prof. Singh Raman
Dr. Vijayaraghavan Venkatesh
Dr. Vinod Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Magnesium alloy
  • Corrosion
  • Coatings
  • Stress corrosion cracking
  • Corrosion fatigue
  • Bioimplants

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Hexagonal Boron Nitride Impregnated Silane Composite Coating for Corrosion Resistance of Magnesium Alloys for Temporary Bioimplant Applications
Metals 2017, 7(12), 518; doi:10.3390/met7120518
Received: 27 September 2017 / Revised: 7 November 2017 / Accepted: 7 November 2017 / Published: 23 November 2017
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Abstract
Magnesium and its alloys are attractive potential materials for construction of biodegradable temporary implant devices. However, their rapid degradation in human body fluid before the desired service life is reached necessitate the application of suitable coatings. To this end, WZ21 magnesium alloy surface
[...] Read more.
Magnesium and its alloys are attractive potential materials for construction of biodegradable temporary implant devices. However, their rapid degradation in human body fluid before the desired service life is reached necessitate the application of suitable coatings. To this end, WZ21 magnesium alloy surface was modified by hexagonal boron nitride (hBN)-impregnated silane coating. The coating was chemically characterised by Raman spectroscopy. Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the coated alloy in Hanks’ solution showed a five-fold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the alloy due to the composite coating. Post-corrosion analyses corroborated the electrochemical data and provided a mechanistic insight of the improvement provided by the composite coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Deep Cryogenic Treatment on the Corrosion Behavior of Mg-7Y-1.5Nd Magnesium Alloy
Metals 2017, 7(10), 427; doi:10.3390/met7100427
Received: 28 August 2017 / Revised: 27 September 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
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Abstract
The effect of quenching on the corrosion resistance of Mg-7Y-1.5Nd alloy was investigated. The as-cast alloy was homogenized at 535 °C for 24 h, followed by quenching in air, water, and liquid nitrogen. Then, all of the samples were peak-aged at 225 °C
[...] Read more.
The effect of quenching on the corrosion resistance of Mg-7Y-1.5Nd alloy was investigated. The as-cast alloy was homogenized at 535 °C for 24 h, followed by quenching in air, water, and liquid nitrogen. Then, all of the samples were peak-aged at 225 °C for 14 h. The microstructures were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior was analyzed by using weight loss rate and gas collection. Electrochemical characterizations revealed that the T4-deep cryogenic sample displayed the strongest corrosion resistance among all of the samples. A new square phase was discovered in the microstructure of the T6-deep cryogenic sample; this phase was hugely responsible for the corrosion property. Cryogenic treatment significantly improved the corrosion resistance of Mg-7Y-1.5Nd alloy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle Finite Element Based Physical Chemical Modeling of Corrosion in Magnesium Alloys
Metals 2017, 7(3), 83; doi:10.3390/met7030083
Received: 18 January 2017 / Revised: 25 February 2017 / Accepted: 28 February 2017 / Published: 7 March 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3831 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Magnesium alloys have found widespread applications in diverse fields such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical and electronics industries due to its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. However, stress corrosion cracking of these alloys severely restricts their applications in several novel technologies. Hence, it will be
[...] Read more.
Magnesium alloys have found widespread applications in diverse fields such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical and electronics industries due to its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. However, stress corrosion cracking of these alloys severely restricts their applications in several novel technologies. Hence, it will be useful to identify the corrosion mechanics of magnesium alloys under external stresses as it can provide further insights on design of these alloys for critical applications. In the present study, the corrosion mechanics of a commonly used magnesium alloy, AZ31, is studied using finite element simulation with a modified constitutive material damage model. The data obtained from the finite element modeling were further used to formulate a mathematical model using computational intelligence algorithm. Sensitivity and parametric analysis of the derived model further corroborated the mechanical response of the alloy in line with the corrosion physics. The proposed approach is anticipated to be useful for materials engineers for optimizing the design criteria for magnesium alloys catered for high temperature applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle Microstructure, Residual Stress, Corrosion and Wear Resistance of Vacuum Annealed TiCN/TiN/Ti Films Deposited on AZ31
Metals 2017, 7(1), 5; doi:10.3390/met7010005
Received: 7 November 2016 / Revised: 15 December 2016 / Accepted: 20 December 2016 / Published: 29 December 2016
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Abstract
Composite titanium carbonitride (TiCN) thin films deposited on AZ31 by DC/RF magnetron sputtering were vacuum annealed at different temperatures. Vacuum annealing yields the following on the structure and properties of the films: the grain grows and the roughness increases with an increase of
[...] Read more.
Composite titanium carbonitride (TiCN) thin films deposited on AZ31 by DC/RF magnetron sputtering were vacuum annealed at different temperatures. Vacuum annealing yields the following on the structure and properties of the films: the grain grows and the roughness increases with an increase of annealing temperature, the structure changes from polycrystalline to single crystal, and the distribution of each element becomes more uniform. The residual stress effectively decreases compared to the as-deposited film, and their corrosion resistance is much improved owing to the change of structure and fusion of surface defects, whereas the wear-resistance is degraded due to the grain growth and the increase of surface roughness under a certain temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle Formation and Corrosion Resistance of Micro-Arc Oxidation Coating on Equal-Channel Angular Pressed AZ91D Mg Alloy
Metals 2016, 6(12), 308; doi:10.3390/met6120308
Received: 21 October 2016 / Revised: 1 December 2016 / Accepted: 2 December 2016 / Published: 7 December 2016
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Abstract
A commercial AZ91D Mg alloy, after bulk grain refinement by various passes of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), was selected for micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in silicate electrolyte, corrosion testing in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution and morphology analyses. The results showed that a large
[...] Read more.
A commercial AZ91D Mg alloy, after bulk grain refinement by various passes of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), was selected for micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in silicate electrolyte, corrosion testing in 3.5 wt % NaCl solution and morphology analyses. The results showed that a large number of ECAP passes resulted in the homogeneous ultrafine-grained (UFG) Mg substrate with broken second-phases. The high-energy defects in the ECAPed samples lowered the anodizing potential of the MAO process, but the partial discharge was severe for those samples below eight passes. Increasing the ECAP pass, the compactness and thickness of the MAO coating first decreased and then increased. Due to the compact coating and the existence of Mg2SiO4, the coated alloy with 16 ECAP passes has a lower corrosion rate and a larger Rt value. Besides the well-known strengthening-toughening effect, grain refinement via multi-pass ECAP can improve surface protection of the MAO coating on the UFG Mg alloy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion of Magnesium Alloys)
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