Special Issue "Advances in Cermets"

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A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marta Ziemnicka-Sylwester (Website)

Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 18, Nishi 8, 060- 8628, Sapporo, Japan
Interests: ultra-high temperature materials; cermets; strengthening; hardness and fracture toughness; wear and corrosion resistance; combustion synthesis; sintering; powder metallurgy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advanced technologies development requires foolproof materials with excellent wear resistance, hardness and fracture toughness. Cermets are ideally designed to combine the optimal properties of both high temperature resistant tough ceramics and ductile metals which possess the ability to reduce cracks propagations and prevent catastrophic failure. Therefore, much better reliability is expected from cermet composites than from any other particular components. Thanks to their superior qualities, cermets are important components in spacecrafts and rocket engines, cutting and drilling tools, fuselage of supersonic planes, combustors in flame vents, among many others.

The precise technology of fabrication is essential, since microstructure refinement and uniform distribution of matrix phase can significantly enhance fracture toughness. However, it is still a challenge for materials engineering to develop new cermets for more severe applications, with matrix phase consisting of ductile metal, rather than brittle intermetallics.

In this Special Issue on “Advances in Cermets” we are soliciting original experimental and theoretical papers, as well as comprehensive reviews which are focused on new and advanced cermets. The scope of this Special Issue covers a very broad range of topics from fundamental concepts, such as phase equilibrium in refractory metal-superhard ceramics systems, hardness and fracture toughness of metal matrix composites, creep and wear resistance, to recent advances in technology development for cemented carbides and borides.

Dr. Marta Ziemnicka-Sylwester
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 800 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • metal matrix composites MMC
  • cermets
  • technical ceramics
  • cemented carbides
  • borides
  • hardness
  • fracture toughness

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Experimental Investigations on the Influence of Adhesive Oxides on the Metal-Ceramic Bond
Metals 2015, 5(1), 119-130; doi:10.3390/met5010119
Received: 23 September 2014 / Revised: 22 December 2014 / Accepted: 12 January 2015 / Published: 21 January 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (678 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of this study was to test the influence of selected base metals, which act as oxide formers, on the metal-ceramic bond of dental veneer systems. Using ion implantation techniques, ions of Al, In and Cu were introduced into near-surface layers [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to test the influence of selected base metals, which act as oxide formers, on the metal-ceramic bond of dental veneer systems. Using ion implantation techniques, ions of Al, In and Cu were introduced into near-surface layers of a noble metal alloy containing no base metals. A noble metal alloy with base metals added for oxide formation was used as a reference. Both alloys were coated with a low-temperature fusing dental ceramic. Specimens without ion implantation or with Al2O3 air abrasion were used as controls. The test procedures comprised the Schwickerath shear bond strength test (ISO 9693-1), profile height (surface roughness) measurements (ISO 4287; ISO 4288; ISO 25178), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Ion implantation resulted in no increase in bond strength. The highest shear bond strengths were achieved after oxidation in air and air abrasion with Al2O3 (41.5 MPa and 47.8 MPa respectively). There was a positive correlation between shear bond strength and profile height. After air abrasion, a pronounced structuring of the surface occurred compared to ion implantation. The established concentration shifts in alloy and ceramic could be reproduced. However, their positive effects on shear bond strength were not confirmed. The mechanical bond appears to be of greater importance for metal-ceramic bonding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cermets)
Open AccessArticle Vaporization and Poor Wettability as the Main Challenges in Fabrication of TiB2-Cu Cermets Studied by SPS
Metals 2014, 4(4), 623-638; doi:10.3390/met4040623
Received: 31 October 2014 / Revised: 9 December 2014 / Accepted: 11 December 2014 / Published: 19 December 2014
PDF Full-text (1767 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
TiB2-Cu cermets with various volume fractions of copper (from 3 to 30 vol. %) were produced via liquid phase sintering at the temperature range 1100–1200 °C in vacuum using spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Full densification could not be achieved [...] Read more.
TiB2-Cu cermets with various volume fractions of copper (from 3 to 30 vol. %) were produced via liquid phase sintering at the temperature range 1100–1200 °C in vacuum using spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. Full densification could not be achieved as the consequence of poor wettability and vaporizing Cu. The quantitative Rietveld analysis indicated that insignificant reduction in Cu content occurred only in sample with initially 3 vol. % of Cu, but then densification was negligible. The relative density improved along with increasing volume content of Cu (10–20 vol. %), but then predominant amount of Cu introduced was reduced as the effect of vaporization or swelling, which caused that pellet with intended 20 or 30 vol. % of Cu contained respectively only 6 or 17 vol. % after sintering. Moreover, Cu droplets were released from the die at the temperature of 1000–1030 °C near the Cu melting point. The effect of vaporization was successfully reduced by increased heating rate and when isothermal annealing process was skipped, however, it could not be entirely eliminated. The experimental results on Cu vaporization are confronted with parameters that are commonly considered in the production of cermets, such as oxidation, wettability, contact angle and viscosity as well as their impact on densification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cermets)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Atomistic Structure of Metal/Ceramic Interfaces Is the Key Issue for Developing Better Properties
Metals 2014, 4(3), 410-427; doi:10.3390/met4030410
Received: 3 June 2014 / Revised: 9 August 2014 / Accepted: 11 August 2014 / Published: 20 August 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1444 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Metal-metal-, ceramic-metal-composites (MMC, CMC) and related functional materials are steadily gaining interest for practical applications. This invited overview paper is divided into three parts. First, the importance of interfaces in material science is emphasized, then basics of computer modeling of interfaces on [...] Read more.
Metal-metal-, ceramic-metal-composites (MMC, CMC) and related functional materials are steadily gaining interest for practical applications. This invited overview paper is divided into three parts. First, the importance of interfaces in material science is emphasized, then basics of computer modeling of interfaces on atomic scale is outlined, followed by the description of some interface examples and their applications. Atomistic modeling requires the specific determination of the orientation relationship between both crystal lattices facing the heterogeneous interface, the interface plane, and translation vectors of two facing crystals. Examples of the atomistic structure are described in this paper for interfaces, such as MgO/Ag, MgO/TiN, Al2O3/Fe, and others. The trend in this research is gradually, but steadily shifting from structural towards functional materials, because atomic binding at interfaces offers a broad spectrum of new properties to be utilized for applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cermets)
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