Special Issue "Metallic Additive Manufacturing: Design, Process and Post-processing"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Ian Gibson

Professor of Industrial Design, School of Engineering, Deakin University, CADET Building, Waurn Ponds Campus, Geelong, Victoria 3216, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: additive manufacturing; medical modeling; rapid prototyping; 3D printing; industrial design
Guest Editor
Dr. Amir Mahyar Khorasani

School of Engineering, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: additive manufacturing; machining; machine tools

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metals provide a forum for publishing original papers that advance the in-depth understanding of metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) comprising, design, process and post-processing. Papers that have a high impact potential and/or substantially advance knowledge in AM are sought. Emphasis is on design, process and post-processing of additive manufactured materials, but is not limited to these areas.

 

The following aspects of the science and engineering of AM metallic materials are of particular interest:

  • Design for metal AM.

  • Optimization in design and its effect on the mechanical properties.

  • AM process control and modeling.

  • Topology optimization for industrial and medical purposes.

  • Characterization of the structure as it relates to the understanding of the process.

  • Post-processing to achieve the desired mechanical properties for different applications.

  • Surface quality, morphology, and machinability.

  • Thermal phenomena and mass transfer in solidification of the process.

 

This Special Issue of Metals welcomes papers that use theory or simulation that substantially advance our understanding of the AM of metals. Submitted papers should demonstrate relevance to the AM community.

 

Prof. Ian Gibson
Dr. Amir Mahyar Khorasani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing

  • Post processing

  • Design optimization

  • Topology optimization

  • Mechanical properties

  • Characterization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Cryogenic Treatment after Annealing of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Sheet on Its Formability at Room Temperature
Metals 2018, 8(5), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8050295
Received: 24 February 2018 / Revised: 3 April 2018 / Accepted: 22 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
In this article, the effects of cryogenic treatment after annealing on the formability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy sheet were experimentally studied. The Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy was treated by cryogenic treatment after annealing (ACT). Tensile tests were carried out using a universal machine at room
[...] Read more.
In this article, the effects of cryogenic treatment after annealing on the formability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy sheet were experimentally studied. The Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy was treated by cryogenic treatment after annealing (ACT). Tensile tests were carried out using a universal machine at room temperature. The microstructure evolution of Ti-6Al-4V subjected to ACT was also investigated using an optical microscope (OM). Both the shearing performance and drawing formability were analyzed by punch shearing tests and deep drawing tests, respectively. Results showed that after ACT, the tendency of the β phase can be apparently changing into stable β’ and α’ phases. The elastic modulus is lower than that of the untreated material. It was found that both the yield strength and tensile strength are declined slightly, whereas the ductility is increased significantly. The shear strength in punch shearing is decreased at room temperature and cryogenic temperature. The ratio of smooth zone on the section after ACT3 is much larger than the others. The rollover diameters are not obviously greater than those of the untreated. Additionally, the height of the burr shows a decreasing trend after ACT. During deep drawing, drawing depth is deeper than that of the untreated material, the drawing load after ACT is reduced, and the decreasing tendency of the drawing load slows down. It is noted that the micro-cracks occur at the bottom of the sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Additive Manufacturing: Design, Process and Post-processing)
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Open AccessArticle Case Study to Illustrate the Potential of Conformal Cooling Channels for Hot Stamping Dies Manufactured Using Hybrid Process of Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) and Milling
Metals 2018, 8(2), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8020102
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 30 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (13626 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hot stamping dies include cooling channels to treat the formed sheet. The optimum cooling channels of dies and molds should adapt to the shape and surface of the dies, so that a homogeneous temperature distribution and cooling are guaranteed. Nevertheless, cooling ducts are
[...] Read more.
Hot stamping dies include cooling channels to treat the formed sheet. The optimum cooling channels of dies and molds should adapt to the shape and surface of the dies, so that a homogeneous temperature distribution and cooling are guaranteed. Nevertheless, cooling ducts are conventionally manufactured by deep drilling, attaining straight channels unable to follow the geometry of the tool. Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) is an additive manufacturing technique capable of fabricating nearly free-form integrated cooling channels and therefore shape the so-called conformal cooling. The present work investigates the design and manufacturing of conformal cooling ducts, which are additively built up on hot work steel and then milled in order to attain the final part. Their mechanical performance and heat transfer capability has been evaluated, both experimentally and by means of thermal simulation. Finally, conformal cooling conduits are evaluated and compared to traditional straight channels. The results show that LMD is a proper technology for the generation of cooling ducts, opening the possibility to produce new geometries on dies and molds and, therefore, new products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Additive Manufacturing: Design, Process and Post-processing)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Mechanical Properties of Stainless-Steel Structures Fabricated by Composite Extrusion Modelling
Metals 2018, 8(2), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8020084
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
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Abstract
Composite Extrusion Modelling (CEM) is a new additive manufacturing process for metal that uses Metal Injection Moulding (MIM) materials. The MIM material is printed on a build plate using a moveable extruder. Subsequently, the printed greenparts are debinded and sintered in a two-step
[...] Read more.
Composite Extrusion Modelling (CEM) is a new additive manufacturing process for metal that uses Metal Injection Moulding (MIM) materials. The MIM material is printed on a build plate using a moveable extruder. Subsequently, the printed greenparts are debinded and sintered in a two-step oven process. In contrast to beam-based additive processes, the microstructure of the part is not generated layer-wise by melting and solidifying small areas, but in a steady manner during sintering from the outside of the part to the inside, in order to create dense metal parts. In this study, various structures were printed and sintered in order to investigate the mechanical properties and dimensional properties of the resulting stainless-steel structures, and their dependence on the infill percentage. The measured density of the dense sintered parts is 7.47 g/cm3 and the sintering shrinkage is in the range from 14.6 to 16.8%. The compressive strength (σdm50) of the specimens varies in the range from 1220 to 2345 MPa dependent on the infill percentage. The measured density and the sintering shrinkage are very close to the values specified by the manufacturer of the MIM material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Additive Manufacturing: Design, Process and Post-processing)
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Open AccessArticle Permeability Study of Austenitic Stainless Steel Surfaces Produced by Selective Laser Melting
Metals 2017, 7(12), 521; https://doi.org/10.3390/met7120521
Received: 20 October 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 17 November 2017 / Published: 24 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3859 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Selective laser melting (SLM) is emerging as a versatile process for fabricating different metal components with acceptable mechanical properties and geometrical accuracy. The process has been used in the manufacturing of several parts (e.g., aerospace or biomedical components), and offers the capability to
[...] Read more.
Selective laser melting (SLM) is emerging as a versatile process for fabricating different metal components with acceptable mechanical properties and geometrical accuracy. The process has been used in the manufacturing of several parts (e.g., aerospace or biomedical components), and offers the capability to tailor the performance of several surface and mechanical properties. In this work, permeability properties and surface roughness of stainless steel (SS316L) surfaces were evaluated through experimentation with three different laser scanning patterns (chessboard, meander, and stripe), and different sloping angles between the fabricated surface and the laser beam incident on the process. Results showed that for each scanning pattern, the roughness decreased as the sloping angle increased consistently in all experimental trials. Furthermore, in the case of the permeability evaluation, the manufactured surfaces showed changes in properties for each series of experiments performed with different scanning patterns. The chessboard pattern showed a change of 67° to 107° in contact angle, while the meander and stripe patterns showed a variation in contact angle in a range of 65° to 85°. The different scanning strategies in the SLM process resulted in an alternative method for surface enhancement with different hydrophobicity properties, valuable for designing the most appropriate permeability characteristics for specific applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metallic Additive Manufacturing: Design, Process and Post-processing)
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Graphical abstract

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