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Special Issue "Frontiers of Radioimmunotherapy"

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A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (12 December 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Rune Nilsson (Website)

Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden
Interests: radioimmunotherapy; tumor immunology, immunotherapy; tumor microenvironment; antibody conjugates
Guest Editor
Dr. Sophie E. Eriksson (Website)

Lund University Cancer Center (LUCC),Division of Oncology and Pathology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University,Sweden
Interests: radioimmunotherapy; radionuclides; metastases; radiobiology; preclinical models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Radioimmunotherapy, which utilizes radiolabeled antibodies for targeting tumors, is now an established therapy for Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients. Clinical research is still on-going to further improve the therapy for these patients (e.g., by attempting to prolong the duration of the clinical response).

The majority of the current pre-clinical radioimmunotherapy research aims at transferring the clinical success of treating lymphoma to treating solid tumors. Solid tumors are generally more radioresistant than NHL and require higher absorbed doses for therapeutic effect. Poor tumor accretion and the unfavorable pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies are major impediments that limit the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in solid tumors. Ways of increasing the therapeutic outcome may involve pretargeting (where an unlabeled antibody construct is followed by a radiolabeled low molecular weight component that binds to the antibody construct), fractionated radioimmunotherapy, and the use of alpha-particle emitting radionuclides that have a higher radiobiological effect than that of the generally used beta-particle emitters. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitters has been proposed for treating disseminated or residual diseases (due the short range of the particles).

Clinically, the consensus is that radioimmunotherapy is best used to treat small tumors (instead of bulky diseases). An interesting area for clinical research is the evaluation of combining radioimmunotherapy with other modalities (e.g. chemotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors or immunotherapy).

The articles in this Special Issue of IJMS will cover a broad range of topics, from both pre-clinical and clinical research, which concern the improvement of radioimmunotherapy, so as to give the reader an update on the latest developments.

Dr. Rune Nilsson
Dr. Sophie E. Eriksson
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • radioimmunotherapy
  • radionuclide therapy
  • radionuclide
  • alpha emitter
  • beta emitter
  • pretargeting
  • tumor therapy
  • radiobiology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(2), 3932-3954; doi:10.3390/ijms16023932
Received: 5 January 2015 / Accepted: 29 January 2015 / Published: 11 February 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (829 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine [...] Read more.
This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Radioimmunotherapy)
Open AccessReview Rescue Effects: Irradiated Cells Helped by Unirradiated Bystander Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16(2), 2591-2609; doi:10.3390/ijms16022591
Received: 26 November 2014 / Revised: 16 December 2014 / Accepted: 13 January 2015 / Published: 23 January 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1063 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The rescue effect describes the phenomenon where irradiated cells or organisms derive benefits from the feedback signals sent from the bystander unirradiated cells or organisms. An example of the benefit is the mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damages in the irradiated cells. The [...] Read more.
The rescue effect describes the phenomenon where irradiated cells or organisms derive benefits from the feedback signals sent from the bystander unirradiated cells or organisms. An example of the benefit is the mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damages in the irradiated cells. The rescue effect can compromise the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) (and actually all radiotherapy). In this paper, the discovery and subsequent confirmation studies on the rescue effect were reviewed. The mechanisms and the chemical messengers responsible for the rescue effect studied to date were summarized. The rescue effect between irradiated and bystander unirradiated zebrafish embryos in vivo sharing the same medium was also described. In the discussion section, the mechanism proposed for the rescue effect involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway was scrutinized. This mechanism could explain the promotion of cellular survival and correct repair of DNA damage, dependence on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and modulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in irradiated cells. Exploitation of the NF-κB pathway to improve the effectiveness of RIT was proposed. Finally, the possibility of using zebrafish embryos as the model to study the efficacy of RIT in treating solid tumors was also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Radioimmunotherapy)
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