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Special Issue "Coastal GIS"

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A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Timothy Nyerges

Department of Geography, University of Washington, Box 353550, Smith Hall 408, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 206 543 3313
Interests: CyberGIS Software Integration for Sustained Geospatial Innovation; Spatial-temporal Modeling of Coastal Resilience; Participatory Interaction Modeling of Online Geographic Decision Making; Spatial-Temporal Modeling of Watershed Sustainability; Large-scale geospatial data libraries for public decision support; Collaborative Decision Support for Water Resources; Collaborative Decision Support for Coastal Resilience; GIS for Risk Evaluation and Decision Analysis; Student learning outcomes within group projects with GIS; Geographic information representation, human cognition, and user interfaces; Land use, transportation, and environmental applications of GIS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

More than half of the world's human population lived in coastal areas in 2000, and this proportion is predicted to increase to 75 percent by 2025. Geographic information systems (GIS) are being developed and used by technical specialists, stakeholder publics, and executive/policy decision makers for improving our understanding and management of coastal areas, separately and together as more organizations focus on improving the sustainability and resilience of coastal systems. Coastal systems, defined as the area of land closely connected to the sea, including barrier islands, wetlands, mudflats, beaches, estuaries, cities, towns, recreational areas, and maritime facilities; the continental seas and shelves; and the overlying atmosphere, are subject to complex and dynamic interactions among natural and human-driven processes. Coastal systems are crucial to regional and national economies, hosting valued human-built infrastructure and providing ecosystem services that sustain human well-being. Data sets characterizing geospatial dynamics of coastal systems phenomena are of increasingly larger sizes, and thus the need for effective spatial-temporal data management is ever more critical. GIS data analyses using spatial-temporal data are becoming more important as support for exploring, understanding, and decision making about complex coastal problems characterized in terms of human-environment systems. GIS research that explores, integrates, analyzes, synthesizes, and visualizes geospatial data about human-environment interaction are all considered important activities for coastal GIS.

The following topics are encouraged, but others will be considered as well.

  • spatial-temporal data collection for characterizing coastal systems
  • remote sensing and LiDAR data collection on the coast
  • spatial-temporal data modeling and data management about coastal phenomena
  • spatial-temporal analysis and/or modeling of coastal human-environment interactions
  • description, assessment, and/or management of sustainable and resilient coastal systems
  • geovisualization of dynamic coastal phenomena (e.g., land, water, air, human activities)
  • change detection of coastal phenomena and the processes underlying these phenomena
  • primary, secondary and cumulative impacts synthesized from analysis of coastal development
  • governing and governance of coastal systems areas with support from GIS
  • decision support for marine spatial planning and management
  • applications of coastal GIS for nearshore landscape-waterscape design and decision making,
  • applications in coastal emergency management, e.g., disaster mitigation, response and recovery
  • advanced technology instrumentation for collection of coastal GIS data
  • simulations of coastal processes for geospatial education

Prof. Dr. Timothy Nyerges
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 900 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • coastal
  • GIS
  • coastal systems
  • geospatial dynamics

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Introduction to the Special Issue: Coastal GIS
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 1118-1121; doi:10.3390/ijgi3031118
Received: 10 September 2014 / Accepted: 10 September 2014 / Published: 16 September 2014
PDF Full-text (617 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This special issue of the ISPRS International Journal of Geographic Information about “Coastal GIS” is motivated by many circumstances. More than one-half of the world’s human population lives in coastal areas (within 200 kilometers of coast) as of 2000 [1]. The trend toward
[...] Read more.
This special issue of the ISPRS International Journal of Geographic Information about “Coastal GIS” is motivated by many circumstances. More than one-half of the world’s human population lives in coastal areas (within 200 kilometers of coast) as of 2000 [1]. The trend toward coastal habitation is expected to continue in the US with the total being 75 percent by 2025, meaning that coastal human–environment interactions will likely increase and intensify [2]. Geographic information systems (GIS) are being developed and used by technical specialists, stakeholder publics, and executive/policy decision makers for improving our understanding and management of coastal areas, separately and together as more organizations focus on improving the sustainability and resilience of coastal systems. Coastal systems—defined as the area of land closely connected to the sea, including barrier islands, wetlands, mudflats, beaches, estuaries, cities, towns, recreational areas, and maritime facilities, the continental seas and shelves, and the overlying atmosphere—are subject to complex and dynamic interactions among natural and human-driven processes. Coastal systems are crucial to regional and national economies, hosting valued human-built infrastructure and providing ecosystem services that sustain human well-being. This special issue of IJGI about coastal GIS presents a collection of nine papers that address many of the issues mentioned above. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Spatial Representation of Coastal Risk: A Fuzzy Approach to Deal with Uncertainty
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 1077-1100; doi:10.3390/ijgi3031077
Received: 1 October 2013 / Revised: 17 July 2014 / Accepted: 6 August 2014 / Published: 26 August 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4773 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Spatial information for coastal risk assessment is inherently uncertain. This uncertainty may be due to different spatial and temporal components of geospatial data and to their semantics. The spatial uncertainty can be expressed either quantitatively or qualitatively. Spatial uncertainty in coastal risk assessment
[...] Read more.
Spatial information for coastal risk assessment is inherently uncertain. This uncertainty may be due to different spatial and temporal components of geospatial data and to their semantics. The spatial uncertainty can be expressed either quantitatively or qualitatively. Spatial uncertainty in coastal risk assessment itself arises from poor spatial representation of risk zones. Indeed, coastal risk is inherently a dynamic, complex, scale-dependent, and vague, phenomenon in concept. In addition, representing the associated zones with polygons having well-defined boundaries does not provide a realistic method for efficient and accurate representing of the risk. This paper proposes a conceptual framework, based on fuzzy set theory, to deal with the problems of ill-defined risk zone boundaries and the inherent uncertainty issues. To do so, the nature and level of uncertainty, as well as the way to model it are characterized. Then, a fuzzy representation method is developed where the membership functions are derived based on expert-knowledge. The proposed approach is then applied in the Perce region (Eastern Quebec, Canada) and results are presented and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
Open AccessArticle Development of a GIS-Based Tool for Aquaculture Siting
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(2), 800-816; doi:10.3390/ijgi3020800
Received: 1 October 2013 / Revised: 15 May 2014 / Accepted: 26 May 2014 / Published: 10 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (541 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nearshore aquaculture siting requires the integration of a range of physical, environmental, and social factors. As a result, the information demand often presents coastal managers with a range of complex issues regarding where specific types of aquaculture should be ideally located that reduce
[...] Read more.
Nearshore aquaculture siting requires the integration of a range of physical, environmental, and social factors. As a result, the information demand often presents coastal managers with a range of complex issues regarding where specific types of aquaculture should be ideally located that reduce environmental and social impacts. Here we provide a framework and tool for managers faced with these issues that incorporate physical and biological parameters along with geospatial infrastructure. In addition, the development of the tool and underlying data included was undertaken with careful input and consideration of local population concerns and cultural practices. Using Hawaiʻi as a model system, we discuss the various considerations that were integrated into an end-user tool for aquaculture siting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
Open AccessArticle A Dynamic GIS as an Efficient Tool for Integrated Coastal Zone Management
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(2), 391-407; doi:10.3390/ijgi3020391
Received: 19 September 2013 / Revised: 26 February 2014 / Accepted: 5 March 2014 / Published: 26 March 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2359 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This contribution addresses both the role of geographical information in participatory research of coastal zones, and its potential to bridge the gap between research and coastal zone management. Over a one year period, heterogeneous data (spatial, temporal, qualitative and quantitative) were obtained which
[...] Read more.
This contribution addresses both the role of geographical information in participatory research of coastal zones, and its potential to bridge the gap between research and coastal zone management. Over a one year period, heterogeneous data (spatial, temporal, qualitative and quantitative) were obtained which included the process of interviews, storing in a spatio-temporal database. The GIS (Geographic Information System) produced temporal snapshots of daily human activity patterns allowing it to map, identify and quantify potential space-time conflicts between activities. It was furthermore used to facilitate the exchange of ideas and knowledge at various levels: by mapping, simulation, GIS analysis and data collection. Results indicated that both captured data and the participatory workshop added real value to management and therefore it was deemed well managed by stakeholders. To incorporate a dynamic GIS would enhance pro-active integrated management by opening the path for better discussions whilst permitting management simulated scenarios. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
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Open AccessArticle The Application of WebGIS Tools for Visualizing Coastal Flooding Vulnerability and Planning for Resiliency: The New Jersey Experience
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(2), 408-429; doi:10.3390/ijgi3020408
Received: 2 October 2013 / Revised: 5 March 2014 / Accepted: 10 March 2014 / Published: 26 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1077 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While sea level rise is a world-wide phenomenon, mitigating its impacts is a local decision-making challenge that is going to require site-specific remedies. Faced with a variety of conflicting mandates and uncertainty as to appropriate responses, local land use planners and managers need
[...] Read more.
While sea level rise is a world-wide phenomenon, mitigating its impacts is a local decision-making challenge that is going to require site-specific remedies. Faced with a variety of conflicting mandates and uncertainty as to appropriate responses, local land use planners and managers need place-based decision support tools. With the increasing availability of high-resolution digital elevation models and the advancing speed and sophistication of web-based mapping, a number of web geographic information systems (GIS) tools have been developed to map and visualize what areas of a coastal landscape will potentially be flooded under different scenarios of sea level rise. This paper presents a case study of one such WebGIS application, NJFloodMapper (www.NJFloodMapper.org), with a focus on the user-centered design process employed to help our target audience of coastal decision-makers in the state of New Jersey, USA, access and understand relevant geographic information concerning sea level rise and exposure to coastal inundation, as well as assess the vulnerability of key infrastructure, populations and natural resources within their communities. We discuss the success of this approach amidst the broader context of the application of WebGIS tools in this arena. Due to its flexible design and user-friendly interface, NJFloodMapper has been widely adopted by government and non-governmental agencies in the state to assess coastal flooding exposure and vulnerability in the aftermath of a recent destructive coastal storm. However, additional decision support tools are needed to help coastal decision-makers translate the place-based information into concrete action plans aimed at promoting more resilient coastal land use decisions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
Open AccessArticle An Operational Web-Based Indicator System for Integrated Coastal Zone Management
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(1), 326-344; doi:10.3390/ijgi3010326
Received: 5 December 2013 / Revised: 14 February 2014 / Accepted: 5 March 2014 / Published: 14 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1042 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Coastal zones are under severe pressure from anthropogenic activities, as well as on-going climate change with associated sea level rise and increased storminess. These challenges call for integrated and forward looking solutions. The concept on Integrated Coastal Zone Management, as defined during the
[...] Read more.
Coastal zones are under severe pressure from anthropogenic activities, as well as on-going climate change with associated sea level rise and increased storminess. These challenges call for integrated and forward looking solutions. The concept on Integrated Coastal Zone Management, as defined during the last twenty years, provides the overall policy frames, but tools to support the planning and management efforts are almost lacking. Furthermore, the forward-looking dimension to embrace the effects of climate change is nearly absent in most implementations. The BLAST project, financed by the European Union Regional Fund through the INTERREG IV North Sea Region Programme, aimed at developing a web-based decision support system to assist Integrated Coastal Zone Management from a climate change perspective, and the current paper describes the methods used and the computing platform for implementing a decision support system. The software applied in developing the system is mainly Open Source components, thus, facilitating a more widespread use of the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
Open AccessArticle Habitat Mapping and Change Assessment of Coastal Environments: An Examination of WorldView-2, QuickBird, and IKONOS Satellite Imagery and Airborne LiDAR for Mapping Barrier Island Habitats
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(1), 297-325; doi:10.3390/ijgi3010297
Received: 12 October 2013 / Revised: 11 February 2014 / Accepted: 20 February 2014 / Published: 6 March 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (2561 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Habitat mapping can be accomplished using many techniques and types of data. There are pros and cons for each technique and dataset, therefore, the goal of this project was to investigate the capabilities of new satellite sensor technology and to assess map accuracy
[...] Read more.
Habitat mapping can be accomplished using many techniques and types of data. There are pros and cons for each technique and dataset, therefore, the goal of this project was to investigate the capabilities of new satellite sensor technology and to assess map accuracy for a variety of image classification techniques based on hundreds of field-work sites. The study area was Masonboro Island, an undeveloped area in coastal North Carolina, USA. Using the best map results, a habitat change assessment was conducted between 2002 and 2010. WorldView-2, QuickBird, and IKONOS satellite sensors were tested using unsupervised and supervised methods using a variety of spectral band combinations. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) elevation and texture data pan-sharpening, and spatial filtering were also tested. In total, 200 maps were generated and results indicated that WorldView-2 was consistently more accurate than QuickBird and IKONOS. Supervised maps were more accurate than unsupervised in 80% of the maps. Pan-sharpening the images did not consistently improve map accuracy but using a majority filter generally increased map accuracy. During the relatively short eight-year period, 20% of the coastal study area changed with intertidal marsh experiencing the most change. Smaller habitat classes changed substantially as well. For example, 84% of upland scrub-shrub experienced change. These results document the dynamic nature of coastal habitats, validate the use of the relatively new Worldview-2 sensor, and may be used to guide future coastal habitat mapping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
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Open AccessArticle Barrier Island Dynamics Using Mass Center Analysis: A New Way to Detect and Track Large-Scale Change
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(1), 49-65; doi:10.3390/ijgi3010049
Received: 30 November 2013 / Revised: 7 January 2014 / Accepted: 8 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3972 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A geographic information system (GIS) was used to introduce and test a new method for quantitatively characterizing topographic change. Borrowing from classic Newtonian mechanics, the concept of a body’s center of mass is applied to the geomorphic landscape, and the barrier island environment
[...] Read more.
A geographic information system (GIS) was used to introduce and test a new method for quantitatively characterizing topographic change. Borrowing from classic Newtonian mechanics, the concept of a body’s center of mass is applied to the geomorphic landscape, and the barrier island environment in particular, to evaluate the metric’s potential as a proxy for detecting, tracking and visualizing change. Two barrier islands along North Carolina’s Outer Banks are used to test this idea: Core Banks, uninhabited and largely-undeveloped, and Hatteras Island, altered by the presence of a protective dune system. Findings indicate that for Core Banks, the alongshore change in the center of mass is in accord with dominate littoral transport and wind conditions. Cross-shore change agrees with independent estimates for the island migration rates. This lends credence to our assertion that the mass center metric has the potential to be a viable proxy for describing wholesale barrier migration and would be a valuable addition to the already-established ocean shoreline and subaerial volume metrics. More research is, however, required to demonstrate efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
Open AccessArticle Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and Multispectral Scanner (MSS) Studies Examine Coastal Environments Influenced by Mining
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(1), 66-95; doi:10.3390/ijgi3010066
Received: 28 November 2013 / Revised: 20 December 2013 / Accepted: 10 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1393 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There are numerous examples of past and present mine disposal into freshwater and marine coastal bays and riverine environments. Due to its high spatial resolution and extended water penetration, coastal light detection and ranging (LiDAR), coupled with multispectral scanning (MSS), has great promise
[...] Read more.
There are numerous examples of past and present mine disposal into freshwater and marine coastal bays and riverine environments. Due to its high spatial resolution and extended water penetration, coastal light detection and ranging (LiDAR), coupled with multispectral scanning (MSS), has great promise for resolving disturbed shoreline features in low turbidity environments. Migrating mine tailings present serious issues for Lake Superior and coastal marine environments. Previous investigations in Lake Superior uncovered a metal-rich “halo” around the Keweenaw Peninsula, related to past copper mining practices. For over a century, waste rock migrating from shoreline tailing piles has moved along extensive stretches of coastline, compromising critical fish breeding grounds, damming stream outlets, transgressing into wetlands and along recreational beaches and suppressing benthic invertebrate communities. In Grand (Big) Traverse Bay, Buffalo Reef is an important spawning area for lake trout and whitefish threatened by drifting tailings. The movement of tailings into Buffalo Reef cobble fields may interfere with the hatching of fish eggs and fry survival, either by filling in crevices where eggs are deposited or by toxic effects on eggs, newly hatched larvae or benthic communities. Here, we show that the coastal tailing migration is not “out of sight, out of mind”, but clearly revealed by using a combination of LiDAR and MSS techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)
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Open AccessArticle Optimizing the Use of Secchi Depth as a Proxy for Euphotic Depth in Coastal Waters: An Empirical Study from the Baltic Sea
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2013, 2(4), 1153-1168; doi:10.3390/ijgi2041153
Received: 30 September 2013 / Revised: 5 November 2013 / Accepted: 26 November 2013 / Published: 9 December 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (821 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Potential zone for photosynthesis in natural waters is restricted to a relatively thin illuminated surface water layer. The thickness of this layer is often indirectly estimated by measuring the depth in which 1% of the photosynthetically active radiation entering the water remains. This
[...] Read more.
Potential zone for photosynthesis in natural waters is restricted to a relatively thin illuminated surface water layer. The thickness of this layer is often indirectly estimated by measuring the depth in which 1% of the photosynthetically active radiation entering the water remains. This depth is referred to as the euphotic depth. A coarser way to evaluate the underwater light penetration is to measure the Secchi depth, which is a visual measure of water transparency. The numerical relationship between these two optical parameters, i.e., conversion coefficient m, varies according to the changes in the optical properties of water, especially in transitional coastal waters. The aim of our study is to assess which is the most suitable criterion to base these coefficients on. We tested nine methods, seven of which were locally calibrated with our own in situ data from the optically heterogeneous Baltic Sea archipelago coast of SW Finland. We managed to significantly improve the accuracy of modeling euphotic depths from Secchi depths by using scalable and locally calibrated methods instead of a single fixed coefficient. The best results were achieved by using methods, either continuous functions or series of constants, which are based on water transparency values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal GIS)

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