Special Issue "Occupational Health"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marc B. Schenker
Department of Public Health Sciences, UC Davis School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
Website: http://schenker.ucdavis.edu/
E-Mail: MBSCHENKER@UCDAVIS.EDU
Interests: occupational and environmental health; occupational reproductive hazards; migration and health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health hazards in the workplace are as old as work itself, but at the same time they continue to change and evolve with the changing nature of work and the changing composition of the workforce. Many hazardous industries and jobs have been "exported" from developed to developing countries. This journal issue will explore new work environments and new hazards in the workplace. Workplace hazards caused by behavioral changes both in and outside the workplace will also be considered. Another major focus is the changing composition of the workforce. As the workforce ages in developed countries, consideration must be given to increased risks for the older worker. Many hazardous jobs are done by immigrant workers, who suffer increased risks of injury and illness from their precarious work status. Finally, reduction of occupational injuries and illnesses requires not only etiologic studies but effective interventions. Research on effective interventions to decrease workplace hazards is an area receiving increased attention.

Prof. Dr. Marc B. Schenker
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • work
  • occupation
  • injury
  • illness
  • chemical
  • toxic
  • immigrant
  • aging
  • precarious behavioral
  • worker environmental

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Displaying article 1-8
p. 6500-6516
by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6500-6516; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126500
Received: 30 August 2013; in revised form: 13 November 2013 / Accepted: 14 November 2013 / Published: 29 November 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 6442-6471
by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 6442-6471; doi:10.3390/ijerph10126442
Received: 26 August 2013; in revised form: 13 November 2013 / Accepted: 14 November 2013 / Published: 28 November 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 6154-6168
by , , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 6154-6168; doi:10.3390/ijerph10116154
Received: 2 September 2013; in revised form: 1 November 2013 / Accepted: 4 November 2013 / Published: 14 November 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (712 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 4996-5010
by , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4996-5010; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104996
Received: 15 August 2013; in revised form: 22 September 2013 / Accepted: 1 October 2013 / Published: 14 October 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 4607-4627
by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 4607-4627; doi:10.3390/ijerph10104607
Received: 31 July 2013; in revised form: 5 September 2013 / Accepted: 10 September 2013 / Published: 27 September 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 3157-3171
by , , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(8), 3157-3171; doi:10.3390/ijerph10083157
Received: 13 June 2013; in revised form: 22 July 2013 / Accepted: 22 July 2013 / Published: 25 July 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 1231-1249
by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(4), 1231-1249; doi:10.3390/ijerph10041231
Received: 28 January 2013; Accepted: 13 March 2013 / Published: 26 March 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (417 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
p. 390-398
by , , ,  and
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(1), 390-398; doi:10.3390/ijerph10010390
Received: 24 December 2012; in revised form: 5 January 2013 / Accepted: 10 January 2013 / Published: 16 January 2013
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Research Article
Title: What’s Perceived, What’s Experienced, What’s Reported: A description of injuries on thoroughbred breeding farms among a Latino & non-Latino Workforce
Authors: Jennifer E. Swanberg 1, Jessica Miller Clouser 2, Mary K. Webster 2 and Susan Westneat 3
Affiliation: 1. School of Social Work, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA; E-Mail: swanberg@email.unc.edu
2.
Institute for Workplace Innovation, University of Kentucky College Public Health, Lexington, KY 40536, USA; 3. University of Kentucky College of Public Health, Lexington, KY 40536, USA
Abstract: Animal production is a dangerous industry and increasingly reliant on a Latino workforce. Within animal production, little is known about the risks or the occupational hazards of Thoroughbred breeding. Extant research suggests that horse workers are at risk of musculoskeletal and respiratory symptoms, kicks, and other injuries. However, no known research has examined the experiences of the industry’s immigrant workers, despite their prominence and increased vulnerability. Using data collected from 30 Thoroughbred farms, this paper identifies and describes employer hazard perception as well as types of injuries experienced by workers, and their surrounding circumstances.

Mixed-methods data were collected from Thoroughbred farm representatives via a phone-administered survey; a 2-hour face-to-face semi-structured interview; and injury logs. Quantitative data and data collected from injury logs were entered into SAS and univariate/bivariate analyses were conducted to report nature and frequency of injuries, including farm and worker demographics. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed, entered into ATLAS.ti, and analyzed by three coders to determine themes in injury and hazard perception. Preliminary results indicate that the horse itself is a major perceived hazard and cause of injuries, as are maintenance tasks such as machinery operation. Although Latino workers are more heavily represented on these farms, non-Latinos were more likely to report injuries. Implications for future research are discussed.

Type of Paper: Review
Title:
Pesticide Exposures and Respiratory Health
Authors:
Ming Ye 1, Jeremy Beach 1,2 and Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan 1
Affiliation:
1 Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; E-Mail: sentil@ualberta.ca
2
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Abstract:
Exposure to pesticides occurs in workplaces, neighborhoods in close proximity to farms, and through residential use. Exposure to pesticides has been associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis and COPD as well as impaired lung function. The etiology of respiratory diseases related to exposure to pesticides is not fully understood. Pesticide-induced changes in the immune system, such as Th-1 and Th-2 balance and autoimmunity, may be important in asthma, COPD or the exacerbation of these diseases. Other mechanisms, such as the neurotoxicity of pesticides may also contribute to the etiology of pesticide-associated respiratory diseases, and there is genetic variability in susceptibility to some of these effects.

Last update: 30 April 2013

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert