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Special Issue "Food Allergy, Genes and Environment"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Katrina Jane Allen

Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children’s Hospital, Flemington Rd, Parkville, 3052, Vic, Australia
E-Mail
Interests: food allergy, anaphylaxis, paediatrics, eczema

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Topics include but not limited to:

  • Food Allergy—is it on the rise?
  • What factors could be driving the rise in food allergy?
  • Are genes important for predisposition to food allergy?
  • What is the role of epigenetics in food allergy?
  • Microbial diversity and food allergy
  • Improved diagnostic testing for food allergy
  • The natural history of food allergy
  • Are there genetic risk factors that predispose to persistent food allergy?
  • What is the role of chemical and pollutants in the development of food allergy
  • Is there an urban/rural divide with regards to the prevalence of food allergy?
  • Is food allergy on the rise in the developing world.
  • Is non-IgE mediated food allergy on the rise in line with IgE mediated food allergy?


Prof. Dr. Katrina Jane Allen
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle The Impact of Family History of Allergy on Risk of Food Allergy: A Population-Based Study of Infants
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5364-5377; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115364
Received: 1 August 2013 / Revised: 11 October 2013 / Accepted: 14 October 2013 / Published: 25 October 2013
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (248 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The apparent rapid increase in IgE-mediated food allergy and its implications are now widely recognized, but little is known about the relationship between family history (an indirect measure of genetic risk) and the risk of food allergy. In a population-based study of 5,276
[...] Read more.
The apparent rapid increase in IgE-mediated food allergy and its implications are now widely recognized, but little is known about the relationship between family history (an indirect measure of genetic risk) and the risk of food allergy. In a population-based study of 5,276 one year old infants (HealthNuts), the prevalence of oral food challenge-confirmed food allergy was measured. Associations between family history of allergic disease and food allergy in infants were examined using multiple logistic regression. Food allergy was diagnosed in 534 infants. Compared to those with no family history of allergic disease, children meeting the current definition of “high risk” for allergic disease (one immediate family member with a history of any allergic disease) showed only a modest increase (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.7) in food allergy, while having two or more allergic family members was more strongly predictive of food allergy in the child (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.5–2.3). There were also differences in the associations between family history and egg and peanut allergy in the child. Re-defining “high risk” as two or more allergic family members may be more useful for identification of groups with a significantly increased risk of food allergy both clinically and within research studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Allergy, Genes and Environment)
Open AccessArticle Development of a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Sandwich ELISA for Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 in Food
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(7), 2897-2905; doi:10.3390/ijerph10072897
Received: 6 May 2013 / Revised: 17 June 2013 / Accepted: 3 July 2013 / Published: 12 July 2013
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (160 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara
[...] Read more.
We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara h 1-specific antibody. Using mAb 6 as the capture antibody and HRP-labelled mAb 4 as the detection antibody, the limit of detection (LOD) the assay was 0.34 ng/mL. Cross-reaction analysis showed that this method was strongly specific and had no cross-reactions with Ara h 2, pea protein or soy protein. Sample analysis showed that this ELISA was a useful tool to monitor peanut allergens in food products by measuring Ara h 1 content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Allergy, Genes and Environment)

Review

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Open AccessReview The Potential Link between Gut Microbiota and IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Early Life
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 7235-7256; doi:10.3390/ijerph10127235
Received: 13 October 2013 / Revised: 30 November 2013 / Accepted: 3 December 2013 / Published: 16 December 2013
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (259 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of
[...] Read more.
There has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of IgE-mediated food allergy over recent decades, particularly among infants and young children. The cause of this increase is unknown but one putative factor is a change in the composition, richness and balance of the microbiota that colonize the human gut during early infancy. The coevolution of the human gastrointestinal tract and commensal microbiota has resulted in a symbiotic relationship in which gut microbiota play a vital role in early life immune development and function, as well as maintenance of gut wall epithelial integrity. Since IgE mediated food allergy is associated with immune dysregulation and impaired gut epithelial integrity there is substantial interest in the potential link between gut microbiota and food allergy. Although the exact link between gut microbiota and food allergy is yet to be established in humans, recent experimental evidence suggests that specific patterns of gut microbiota colonization may influence the risk and manifestations of food allergy. An understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and food allergy has the potential to inform both the prevention and treatment of food allergy. In this paper we review the theory and evidence linking gut microbiota and IgE-mediated food allergy in early life. We then consider the implications and challenges for future research, including the techniques of measuring and analyzing gut microbiota, and the types of studies required to advance knowledge in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Allergy, Genes and Environment)
Open AccessReview Overview of Evidence in Prevention and Aetiology of Food Allergy: A Review of Systematic Reviews
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(11), 5781-5806; doi:10.3390/ijerph10115781
Received: 20 September 2013 / Revised: 24 October 2013 / Accepted: 25 October 2013 / Published: 4 November 2013
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (325 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The worldwide prevalence of food allergy appears to be increasing. Early life environmental factors are implicated in the aetiology of this global epidemic. The largest burden of disease is in early childhood, where research efforts aimed at prevention have been focused. Evidence synthesis
[...] Read more.
The worldwide prevalence of food allergy appears to be increasing. Early life environmental factors are implicated in the aetiology of this global epidemic. The largest burden of disease is in early childhood, where research efforts aimed at prevention have been focused. Evidence synthesis from good quality systematic reviews is needed. We performed an overview of systematic reviews concerning the prevention and aetiology of food allergy, retrieving 14 systematic reviews, which covered three broad topics: formula (hydrolysed or soy) for the prevention of food allergy or food sensitization; maternal and infant diet and dietary supplements for the prevention of food allergy or food sensitization and hygiene hypothesis-related interventions. Using the AMSTAR criteria for assessment of methodological quality, we found five reviews to be of high quality, seven of medium quality and two of low quality. Overall we found no compelling evidence that any of the interventions that had been systematically reviewed were related to the risk of food allergy. Updating of existing reviews, and production of new systematic reviews, are needed in areas where evidence is emerging for interventions and environmental associations. Furthermore, additional primary studies, with greater numbers of participants and objective food allergy definitions are urgently required. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Allergy, Genes and Environment)
Open AccessReview The Natural History of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy: Can Skin Prick Tests and Serum-Specific IgE Predict the Resolution of Food Allergy?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(10), 5039-5061; doi:10.3390/ijerph10105039
Received: 2 August 2013 / Revised: 16 September 2013 / Accepted: 8 October 2013 / Published: 15 October 2013
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
IgE-mediated food allergy is a transient condition for some children, however there are few indices to predict when and in whom food allergy will resolve. Skin prick test (SPT) and serum-specific IgE levels (sIgE) are usually monitored in the management of food allergy
[...] Read more.
IgE-mediated food allergy is a transient condition for some children, however there are few indices to predict when and in whom food allergy will resolve. Skin prick test (SPT) and serum-specific IgE levels (sIgE) are usually monitored in the management of food allergy and are used to predict the development of tolerance or persistence of food allergy. The aim of this article is to review the published literature that investigated the predictive value of SPT and sIgE in development of tolerance in children with a previous diagnosis of peanut, egg and milk allergy. A systematic search identified twenty-six studies, of which most reported SPT or sIgE thresholds which predicted persistent or resolved allergy. However, results were inconsistent between studies. Previous research was hampered by several limitations including the absence of gold standard test to diagnose food allergy or tolerance, biased samples in retrospective audits and lack of systematic protocols for triggering re-challenges. There is a need for population-based, prospective studies that use the gold standard oral food challenge (OFC) to diagnose food allergy at baseline and follow-up to develop SPT and sIgE thresholds that predict the course of  food allergy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Allergy, Genes and Environment)

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