Special Issue "Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Robert Loewe

Skin and Endothelium Research Division, Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria
Website | E-Mail
Interests: melanoma; metastasis; microenvironment; tumor lymphangiogenesis; melanoma models; tumor biology; rare skin tumors; dermatopathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

All malignant skin neoplasms together account for more than 50% of all human cancers. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma (non-melanoma skin cancers), are the most numerous of skin tumors, with incidence rates of up to 90 per 100.000. Although the mortality of these tumors is clearly much lower than of melanoma, patients often have to suffer from multiple, sometimes even mutilating, therapeutic procedures.
In 2008, more than 20.000 patients died of cutaneous melanoma in Europe. Nowadays, incidence rates increased to 20 patients per 100,000. For a long period, the only option for successful therapy consisted of early surgery. Recently, new therapeutic options have become to be available, starting to give hope for patients.
Merkel cell carcinoma, cutaneous lymphoma or cutaneous sarcoma are rare but highly malignant skin neoplasms. Patients affected by these tumors often face diagnostic problems and the lack of available therapy.
Because of their mortality, the number of affected patients, increasing incidence rates, as well as therapeutic considerations, skin neoplasms represent an important socioeconomic health problem.

Dr. Robert Loewe
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • melanoma
  • non-melanoma skin cancer
  • Merkel cell carcinoma
  • cutaneous lymphoma
  • skin neoplasm
  • non-melanoma skin cancer

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Detection and Discrimination of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer by Multimodal Imaging
Healthcare 2013, 1(1), 64-83; doi:10.3390/healthcare1010064
Received: 6 August 2013 / Revised: 30 September 2013 / Accepted: 30 September 2013 / Published: 17 October 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (4490 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) belongs to the most frequent human neoplasms. Its exposed location facilitates a fast ambulant treatment. However, in the clinical practice far more lesions are removed than necessary, due to the lack of an efficient pre-operational examination procedure: Standard imaging
[...] Read more.
Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) belongs to the most frequent human neoplasms. Its exposed location facilitates a fast ambulant treatment. However, in the clinical practice far more lesions are removed than necessary, due to the lack of an efficient pre-operational examination procedure: Standard imaging methods often do not provide a sufficient spatial resolution. The demand for an efficient in vivo imaging technique might be met in the near future by non-linear microscopy. As a first step towards this goal, the appearance of NMSC in various microspectroscopic modalities has to be defined and approaches have to be derived to distinguish healthy skin from NMSC using non-linear optical microscopy. Therefore, in this contribution the appearance of ex vivo NMSC in a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging—referred as multimodal imaging—is described. Analogous to H&E staining, an overview of the distinct appearances and features of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma in the complementary modalities is derived, and is expected to boost in vivo studies of this promising technological approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Update and Review on the Surgical Management of Primary Cutaneous Melanoma
Healthcare 2014, 2(2), 234-249; doi:10.3390/healthcare2020234
Received: 19 November 2013 / Revised: 17 April 2014 / Accepted: 6 May 2014 / Published: 10 June 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (257 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The surgical management of malignant melanoma historically called for wide excision of skin and subcutaneous tissue for any given lesion, but has evolved to be rationally-based on pathological staging. Breslow and Clark independently described level and thickness as determinant in prognosis and margin
[...] Read more.
The surgical management of malignant melanoma historically called for wide excision of skin and subcutaneous tissue for any given lesion, but has evolved to be rationally-based on pathological staging. Breslow and Clark independently described level and thickness as determinant in prognosis and margin of excision. The American Joint Committee of Cancer (AJCC) in 1988 combined features from each of these histologic classifications, generating a new system, which is continuously updated and improved. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has also combined several large randomized prospective trials to generate current guidelines for melanoma excision as well. In this article, we reviewed: (1) Breslow and Clark classifications, AJCC and NCCN guidelines, the World Health Organization’s 1988 study, and the Intergroup Melanoma Surgical Trial; (2) Experimental use of Mohs surgery for in situ melanoma; and (3) Surgical margins and utility and indications for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and lymphadenectomy. Current guidelines for the surgical management of a primary melanoma of the skin is based on Breslow microstaging and call for cutaneous margins of resection of 0.5 cm for MIS, 1.0 cm for melanomas ≤1.0 mm thick, 1–2 cm for melanoma thickness of 1.01–2 mm, 2 cm margins for melanoma thickness of 2.01–4 mm, and 2 cm margins for melanomas >4 mm thick. Although the role of SLNB, CLND, and TLND continue to be studied, current recommendations include SLNB for Stage IB (includes T1b lesions ≤1.0 with the adverse features of ulceration or ≥1 mitoses/mm2) and Stage II melanomas. CLND is recommended when sentinel nodes contain metastatic deposits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin)
Open AccessReview Melanoma of the Hand: Current Practice and New Frontiers
Healthcare 2014, 2(1), 125-138; doi:10.3390/healthcare2010125
Received: 30 September 2013 / Revised: 4 February 2014 / Accepted: 17 February 2014 / Published: 6 March 2014
PDF Full-text (596 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Melanoma of the hand represents a complicated clinical entity. Anatomic features of the hand create challenges in successful management of melanoma not encountered elsewhere in the body. The objectives of this article are to outline current standards for managing melanoma of the hand
[...] Read more.
Melanoma of the hand represents a complicated clinical entity. Anatomic features of the hand create challenges in successful management of melanoma not encountered elsewhere in the body. The objectives of this article are to outline current standards for managing melanoma of the hand including diagnosis, surgical, and chemotherapeutic management. Particular emphasis will be placed on currently debated topics of the role of sentinel lymph node biopsy, the role of Mohs micrographic surgery, tissue sparing management of subungual melanoma, and the consideration of melanoma of the hand as a distinct entity based on clinical and molecular studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin)
Open AccessReview Established and Emerging Biomarkers in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma
Healthcare 2014, 2(1), 60-73; doi:10.3390/healthcare2010060
Received: 27 September 2013 / Revised: 4 December 2013 / Accepted: 7 January 2014 / Published: 14 January 2014
PDF Full-text (108 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In an era of personalized medicine, disease specific biomarkers play an increasing role in the stratification of high-risk patient groups. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer with an ever-increasing global incidence, especially in patients under 35-years of age.
[...] Read more.
In an era of personalized medicine, disease specific biomarkers play an increasing role in the stratification of high-risk patient groups. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer with an ever-increasing global incidence, especially in patients under 35-years of age. Despite the excellent prognosis for patients diagnosed with early stage disease, metastatic disease still carries significant overall mortality. Biomarkers aim not only to identify high-risk patients, but also to provide potential therapeutic targets for differing patient subgroups. Furthermore, accessibility to tissue samples from a range of disease stages in malignant melanoma, unlike most other solid tissue tumours, provides the unique opportunity to explore the biology of tumour progression that may be relevant in the biology of cancer as a whole. Over the past decade, there have been major advances in targeted therapies, providing new avenues and hope to patients with this devastating disease. This review will focus on most up to date histological, serological and molecular biomarkers in malignant melanoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin)
Open AccessReview Modeling Melanoma In Vitro and In Vivo
Healthcare 2014, 2(1), 27-46; doi:10.3390/healthcare2010027
Received: 12 November 2013 / Revised: 7 December 2013 / Accepted: 10 December 2013 / Published: 23 December 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (2868 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The behavior of melanoma cells has traditionally been studied in vitro in two-dimensional cell culture with cells adhering to plastic dishes. However, in order to mimic the three-dimensional architecture of a melanoma, as well as its interactions with the tumor microenvironment, there has
[...] Read more.
The behavior of melanoma cells has traditionally been studied in vitro in two-dimensional cell culture with cells adhering to plastic dishes. However, in order to mimic the three-dimensional architecture of a melanoma, as well as its interactions with the tumor microenvironment, there has been the need for more physiologically relevant models. This has been achieved by designing 3D in vitro models of melanoma, such as melanoma spheroids embedded in extracellular matrix or organotypic skin reconstructs. In vivo melanoma models have typically relied on the growth of tumor xenografts in immunocompromised mice. Several genetically engineered mouse models have now been developed which allow the generation of spontaneous melanoma. Melanoma models have also been established in other species such as zebrafish, which are more conducive to imaging and high throughput studies. We will discuss these models as well as novel techniques that are relevant to the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin)
Figures

Open AccessReview B-Mode Ultrasound Imaging, Doppler Imaging, and Real-Time Elastography in Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma and Lymph Node Metastases
Healthcare 2013, 1(1), 84-95; doi:10.3390/healthcare1010084
Received: 24 July 2013 / Revised: 27 September 2013 / Accepted: 17 October 2013 / Published: 23 October 2013
PDF Full-text (3089 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Examination by ultrasonography (US) is a rapid, sensitive, cost-effective, and even portable technique for confirming the presence of tumors. However, US is not routinely used worldwide for the diagnostic work-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma. High-resolution US using a 6–14 MHz or 5–13 MHz
[...] Read more.
Examination by ultrasonography (US) is a rapid, sensitive, cost-effective, and even portable technique for confirming the presence of tumors. However, US is not routinely used worldwide for the diagnostic work-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma. High-resolution US using a 6–14 MHz or 5–13 MHz linear transducer enables the preoperative assessment of tumor size and thickness. Compared with physical examination, US is also very effective in the early detection of lymph node metastases. It can be easily repeated for the follow-up of cutaneous malignant melanoma and lymph node metastases. Ultrasonographic appearance of some lymph nodes may overlap, thus producing diagnostic pitfalls. In such cases with overlapping findings, Doppler imaging and elastography may additionally facilitate the evaluation of cutaneous malignant melanoma and lymph node metastases. US-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) finally helps to confirm ultrasonographic results, thus improving the specificity and sensitivity in difficult situations in which US alone gives unclear results in lymph node assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Melanoma and Neoplasms of Skin)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Healthcare Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
healthcare@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Healthcare
Back to Top