Special Issue "Privacy in the Future Internet"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Christoph Sorge

Department of Computer Science, University of Paderborn, Fürstenallee 11, 33102 Paderborn, Germany
E-Mail
Phone: +49-5251-60-1760
Fax: +49 52 51 60 66 18
Interests: network security; privacy enhancing technologies; data protection and information law; smart grid privacy
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Luigi Lo Iacono

Institute for Media and Imaging Technologies, Cologne University of Applied Sciences, Betzdorfer Str. 2, Cologne, D-50679, Germany
E-Mail
Phone: +49 221 8275 2527
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Simone Fischer-Hübner

Department of Computer Science, Karlstad University, Universitetsgatan 1, S 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden
E-Mail
Phone: 0046547001723
Fax: +46 54 700 1828

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Whatever the Future Internet is going to look like, we can be certain it will impact our daily lives even more than current networks. The “Internet of Things” vision, for example, includes the ubiquitous presence of networked devices, including RFID tags, sensors and sensor networks, and possibly devices we haven’t even considered yet. These do not exist in isolation, as they are used by human beings on the one hand, and sense information about human beings on the other hand. If privacy is not sufficiently taken into account in the design of communication infrastructures, including authentication, access control, and accounting solutions, there is a risk that personal information gathered in the Internet of Things will be abused. The same is true for the “Internet of Services”, where service usage might enable the creation of comprehensive user profiles if privacy risks are not considered in the design stage.

However, new challenges for privacy enhancing technologies do not merely arise from a change of scale or from new applications. Numerous research projects deal with new architectural approaches, e.g. based on network virtualization. How can privacy be built into these architectures, for example by enabling anonymous communication or the handling of privacy policies? Is there a need for new privacy enhancing technologies, or can the existing ones (e.g., onion routing) be easily adapted?

This special issue of Future Internet welcomes all contributions dealing with privacy challenges related to the Future Internet and its applications. This includes, for example:

  • Anonymous communication
  • Privacy-aware AAA solutions
  • Descriptions and models of new threats to privacy
  • User-centric identity management
  • Location privacy
  • Impact of new Internet architectures on privacy-enhancing technologies and vice versa
  • Privacy in future critical infrastructures (e.g., smart energy grid)
  • Future of privacy legislation (defining appropriate legal frameworks for the Future Internet)

Dr. Christoph Sorge
Prof. Dr. Luigi Lo Iacono
Prof. Dr. Simone Fischer-Hübner
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • privacy enhancing technologies
  • identity management
  • anonymous communication
  • internet of things
  • internet of services

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Supporting Trust and Privacy with an Identity-Enabled Architecture
Future Internet 2012, 4(4), 1016-1025; doi:10.3390/fi4041016
Received: 1 September 2012 / Revised: 24 September 2012 / Accepted: 25 October 2012 / Published: 19 November 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (520 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cost reduction and a vastly increased potential to create new services, such as via the proliferation of the Cloud, have led to many more players and “end points”. With many of them being new entrants, possibly short-lived, the question of how to handle
[...] Read more.
Cost reduction and a vastly increased potential to create new services, such as via the proliferation of the Cloud, have led to many more players and “end points”. With many of them being new entrants, possibly short-lived, the question of how to handle trust and privacy in this new context arises. In this paper, we specifically look at the underlying infrastructure that connects end-points served by these players, which is an essential part of the overall architecture to enable trust and privacy. We present an enhanced architecture that allows real people, objects and services to reliably interact via an infrastructure providing assured levels of trust. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Privacy in the Future Internet)
Open AccessArticle Distributed Performance Measurement and Usability Assessment of the Tor Anonymization Network
Future Internet 2012, 4(2), 488-513; doi:10.3390/fi4020488
Received: 1 November 2011 / Revised: 2 March 2012 / Accepted: 8 May 2012 / Published: 15 May 2012
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1671 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While the Internet increasingly permeates everyday life of individuals around the world, it becomes crucial to prevent unauthorized collection and abuse of personalized information. Internet anonymization software such as Tor is an important instrument to protect online privacy. However, due to the performance
[...] Read more.
While the Internet increasingly permeates everyday life of individuals around the world, it becomes crucial to prevent unauthorized collection and abuse of personalized information. Internet anonymization software such as Tor is an important instrument to protect online privacy. However, due to the performance overhead caused by Tor, many Internet users refrain from using it. This causes a negative impact on the overall privacy provided by Tor, since it depends on the size of the user community and availability of shared resources. Detailed measurements about the performance of Tor are crucial for solving this issue. This paper presents comparative experiments on Tor latency and throughput for surfing to 500 popular websites from several locations around the world during the period of 28 days. Furthermore, we compare these measurements to critical latency thresholds gathered from web usability research, including our own user studies. Our results indicate that without massive future optimizations of Tor performance, it is unlikely that a larger part of Internet users would adopt it for everyday usage. This leads to fewer resources available to the Tor community than theoretically possible, and increases the exposure of privacy-concerned individuals. Furthermore, this could lead to an adoption barrier of similar privacy-enhancing technologies for a Future Internet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Privacy in the Future Internet)

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEssay The Clean Privacy Ecosystem of the Future Internet
Future Internet 2013, 5(1), 34-45; doi:10.3390/fi5010034
Received: 9 October 2012 / Revised: 7 December 2012 / Accepted: 6 January 2013 / Published: 14 January 2013
PDF Full-text (183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article speculates on the future of privacy and electronic identities on the Internet. Based on a short review of security models and the development of privacy-enhancing technology, privacy and electronic identities will be discussed as parts of a larger context—an ecosystem of
[...] Read more.
This article speculates on the future of privacy and electronic identities on the Internet. Based on a short review of security models and the development of privacy-enhancing technology, privacy and electronic identities will be discussed as parts of a larger context—an ecosystem of personal information and electronic identities. The article argues for an ecosystem view of personal information and electronic identities, as both personal information and identity information are basic required input for many applications. Therefore, for both application owners and users, a functioning ecosystem of personal information and electronic identification is important. For the future of the Internet, high-quality information and controlled circulation of such information is therefore argued as decisive for the value of future Internet applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Privacy in the Future Internet)

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