Special Issue "NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Beniamino Murgante

School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, 10 Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: spatial planning; spatial simulation; geodemographics; geographic data analysis of socio-economic and population data; planning 2.0; participation 2.0; e-democracy; e-participation
Guest Editor
Dr. Giuseppe Borruso

DEAMS - Department of Economic, Business, Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via A. Valerio, 4/1, 34127 Trieste, Italy
E-Mail
Fax: +39 040 558 7009
Interests: GIS; spatial analysis; geostatistics; network spatial analysis; GI & socioeconomics; economic and business geography; retail geography; geodemographics
Guest Editor
Dr. Maurizio Gibin

Geographic Information Science, Birkbeck College, School of Geography, Room 168, Birkbeck, University of London, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HX, UK
E-Mail
Fax: +44 207 631 6498
Interests: GIS; spatial analysis; geovisualisation and user interaction issues; geographic data analysis of socio-economic and population data; health geography; geodemographics; geoweb 2.0 applications to deploy geographic information; cartography and analytical design in thematic mapping
Guest Editor
Dr. Maria Paradiso

SEGIS Analysis of Social, Juridical, and Economic Systems, University of Sannio, Benevento, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: participation 2.0; e-democracy; e-participation; NeoGeography; economic and business geography; retail geography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the success of our special issue on “NeoGeography and WikiPlanning” (launched in 2011), we are calling for a new issue. We are confident that the evolution of “Web 2.0” is pushing researchers and scholars from different disciplines to address these topics in new avenues for both theoretical and empirical research.

The advent of Web 2.0 made technologies and services available, such as blogs, social networks and media, Wikis and RSS/XML feeds, have allowed many users to create their own content and to share it through relatively simple and freely available tools. The shift to a user-generated content paradigm on the web also fostered changes in sharing and analyzing geographic information. The term “neogeography” arose to describe people’s activities relating to the use and creation their own maps (e.g., the geo-tagging of pictures, movies, websites, etc.). It could be defined as a new bottom–up approach to geography that is prompted by users; this consequently introduces changes in the roles of ‘traditional’ geographers vis-à-vis the “consumers” of geographical contents.

Wilson and Graham remark how neogeography explicitly highlights spatially referenced social practices and, particularly, the fact that neogeographers, rather than just collecting and presenting geographic information—which is possible as a ‘basic’ function in a standard GIS package—“enacts new relationships in the construction of spatial knowledge.”

During the past decades, cartography and geographical representation faced two main revolutions: GIS and Neogeography. The main issue in GIS implementation has been the availability of reliable and accurate spatial information. Nowadays, the wide diffusion of electronic devices providing geo-referenced information produces extensive spatial information datasets. This trend has led to “GIS wikification”, where mass collaboration plays a key role in the main components of spatial information frameworks. Goodchild (2007) defined “Volunteered Geographic Information” (VGI) as the harnessing of tools to create, assemble, and disseminate geographic information that is voluntarily provided by individuals. These individuals create their own contents by marking the locations of occurred events or by labelling certain existing features. Also, Goodchild (2007) introduced the concept of “citizens as sensors”, with neogeographers producing a small-“g” geography, which is focused on the personal and the individual. This small-“g” geography contrasts with the capital-“G” Geography, which is the science of space and place. Furthermore, Turner (2013, in conversation with Goodchild) extended the idea of small-“g” geography to all cognizant individuals, with neogeography as “the domain of new possibilities that are now approachable by anyone”.

Broadly, the volunteered approach is not a new issue in geographic information creation: explorers and travellers have, in the past, informed the cartographer about features of new territories and land and the latter put them on a map. However, at present, this process has obviously been speeded up by the availability of devices and networks to distribute such information. Three factors have contributed to this process: the spread (at least in industrialized and industrializing countries) of low-cost internet connections, the reduction of the positional error in global positioning and satellite systems (GNSS-GPS), and the amazingly growing diffusion of hand-held devices, which are capable of hosting the two aforementioned elements, including smart phones and tablets.

This special issue also represents an opportunity to examine the current situation of Geographic Information and related products. The issue examines the creation, diffusion, and use, through the web, of geographic information and focuses particularly on the Web 2.0 phenomenon, so as to understand how the interaction between producers and non-expert users can modify the traditional fundamentals of map making, which is one of the most ancient forms of human expression. Other than IT and spatial experts (or spatially aware professionals or academics), the issue’s topic should be attractive for people not directly dealing with such 2.0 spatial issues, but who are active as scholars in spatially related disciplines (i.e., geography, geoscientists, spatial economists, spatial planners, etc.). These scholars can contribute with a vision on the role of the “traditional” mainstream subject and their relationship with such new instruments and tools.

Finally, our special issue represents an opportunity for provocative debate and reflection on the roles of both traditional disciplines (e.g., geography, economics, planning, etc.) and of new ones (e.g., GI sciences, image processing, etc.) in comparison with the bottom-up blossoming of uncontrolled, nearly anarchical geographical expressions.

In the present special issue, we can therefore try to address the question raised by Turner in his conversation with Goodchild: how do we engage multiple groups (e.g., neogeographers, Geographers, spatial analysts, GIS specialists, planners, etc.) together? How can neogeography and other traditional disciplines and analyses interact?

Dr. Beniamino Murgante
Dr. Giuseppe Borruso
Dr. Maurizio Gibin
Dr. Maria Paradiso
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 500 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • neogeography
  • volunteered geographic information
  • crowdsourcing
  • collaborative mapping
  • WikiCities
  • wikinomics
  • GeoDesign
  • planning 2.0
  • participation 2.0
  • urban social networks
  • social networks and collaborative/participatory approaches
  • urban sensing
  • e-democracy
  • eParticipation
  • participatory GIS
  • geography
  • technologies for eParticipation; policy modelling; simulation and visualisation
  • second life and participatory games
  • SDI and planning
  • ontologies for urban planning
  • urban computing
  • ubiquitous-city
  • smart cities
  • resilient cities
  • smart cities and sustainable urban development
  • GIS-based mobile applications for smart cities
  • Open Government
  • Open Data
  • VGI VS SDI
  • city Gml
  • Geo-applications for mobile phones
  • Web 2.0; Web 3.0
  • wikinomics; socialnomics
  • WikiCities
  • WikiPlanning
  • renewable energy for cities and smart grids

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Public Involvement in Taking Legislative Action as to the Spatial Development of the Tourist Sector in Greece—The “OpenGov” Platform Experience
Future Internet 2014, 6(4), 735-759; doi:10.3390/fi6040735
Received: 8 July 2014 / Revised: 23 October 2014 / Accepted: 23 October 2014 / Published: 25 November 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (813 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
By the Aarhus Convention (1998) it is recognized the right of citizens to get access to and influence decision-making in respect to issues affecting the state of the environment. More specifically, in Article 8 it is stated that public authorities are forced to
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By the Aarhus Convention (1998) it is recognized the right of citizens to get access to and influence decision-making in respect to issues affecting the state of the environment. More specifically, in Article 8 it is stated that public authorities are forced to engage public participation when preparing regulations or legally binding rules that have a significant environmental impact. Towards this end, Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and their applications have considerably expanded the potential of planners and decision makers to interact with stakeholders and the public and engage them in participatory processes through ICTs-enabled platforms. The focus of the present paper is on the context of public consultation in taking legislative action as to the spatial development of the tourist sector in Greece. It consists of three parts: the first part, where the context of engaging the public in governmental decision-making in Greece is discussed, following the Open Government Partnership (OGP) initiative; the second part, presenting the steps of the “OpenGov” online platform, designed for gathering public knowledge to further improve legislative efforts and policy; and the third part, elaborating on the experience gained by the use of the “OpenGov” platform for decision-making on the spatial development of the tourist sector in Greece. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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Open AccessArticle Towards a Conceptual Framework for WikiGIS
Future Internet 2014, 6(4), 640-672; doi:10.3390/fi6040640
Received: 21 March 2014 / Revised: 25 July 2014 / Accepted: 21 August 2014 / Published: 29 October 2014
PDF Full-text (16729 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As an emerging complex concept, GeoDesign requires an innovative theoretical basis, tools, supports and practices. For this reason, we propose a new concept, “WikiGIS”, designed to answer some dimensions of the GeoDesign process. WikiGIS focuses on the needs of GeoDesign, but we leave
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As an emerging complex concept, GeoDesign requires an innovative theoretical basis, tools, supports and practices. For this reason, we propose a new concept, “WikiGIS”, designed to answer some dimensions of the GeoDesign process. WikiGIS focuses on the needs of GeoDesign, but we leave the door open for future improvement when tested in other areas that may have additional needs. WikiGIS is built on Web 2.0 technologies—and primarily on wiki—to manage the tracking of participants’ editing (i.e., managing the contributions history). It also offers GIS functions for geoprocessing and a design-based approach for sketching proposals. One of the main strengths of WikiGIS is its ability to manage the traceability of contributions with an easy and dynamical access, data quality and deltification. The core of this paper consists of presenting a conceptual framework for WikiGIS using UML diagrams. A user interface is presented later to show how our WikiGIS proposal works. This interface is simply a means to illustrate the concepts underlying WikiGIS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
Open AccessArticle Geography Geo-Wiki in the Classroom: Using Crowdsourcing to Enhance Geographical Teaching
Future Internet 2014, 6(4), 597-611; doi:10.3390/fi6040597
Received: 21 March 2014 / Revised: 11 September 2014 / Accepted: 18 September 2014 / Published: 29 September 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (7336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Geo-Wiki is a crowdsourcing tool used to derive information, based on satellite imagery, to validate and enhance global land cover. Around 5000 users are registered, who contribute to different campaigns to collect data across various domains (e.g., agriculture, biomass, human impact, etc.).
[...] Read more.
Geo-Wiki is a crowdsourcing tool used to derive information, based on satellite imagery, to validate and enhance global land cover. Around 5000 users are registered, who contribute to different campaigns to collect data across various domains (e.g., agriculture, biomass, human impact, etc.). However, seeing the Earth’s surface from above does not provide all of the necessary information for understanding what is happening on the ground. Instead, we need to enhance this experience with local knowledge or with additional information, such as geo-located photographs of surface features with annotation. The latest development in enhancing Geo-Wiki in this context has been achieved through collaboration with the University of Waterloo to set up a separate branch called Geography Geo-Wiki for use in undergraduate teaching. We provide the pedagogical objectives for this branch and describe two modules that we have introduced in first and third year Physical Geography classes. The majority of the feedback was positive and in, many cases, was part of what the student liked best about the course. Future plans include the development of additional assignments for the study of environmental processes using Geo-Wiki that would engage students in a manner that is very different from that of conventional teaching. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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Open AccessArticle Neogeography and Preparedness for Real-to-Virtual World Knowledge Transfer: Conceptual Steps to Minecraft Malta
Future Internet 2014, 6(3), 542-555; doi:10.3390/fi6030542
Received: 14 February 2014 / Revised: 19 June 2014 / Accepted: 16 July 2014 / Published: 28 August 2014
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Abstract
Societies have rapidly morphed into complex entities that are creating accessibility, yet, at the same time, they are developing new forms of neogeographic-poverty related to information uptake. Those that have managed to partake in the opportunities provided by the web have new vistas
[...] Read more.
Societies have rapidly morphed into complex entities that are creating accessibility, yet, at the same time, they are developing new forms of neogeographic-poverty related to information uptake. Those that have managed to partake in the opportunities provided by the web have new vistas to survive in, in contrast to the new poor who have limited or no access to information. New forms of data in spatial format are accessible to all, however few realize the implications of such a transitional change in wellbeing: Whether entire societies or individuals. The different generations taking up the information access can face different levels of accessibility that may be limited by access to online data, knowledge of usage of tools and the understanding of the results, all within the limits on the spaces they are familiar with. This paper reviews a conceptual process underlining the initial steps of a long-term project in the Maltese Islands that seeks to create an online series of tools that bring the concept of “physical place” to the different generations through the management of a major project, the creation of a 3D virtuality, employing scanning processes, GIS, conversion aspects, and a small block-based Minecraft engine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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Open AccessArticle Tweet My Street: A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration for the Analysis of Local Twitter Data
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 378-396; doi:10.3390/fi6020378
Received: 29 January 2014 / Revised: 18 April 2014 / Accepted: 7 May 2014 / Published: 27 May 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3326 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tweet My Street is a cross-disciplinary project exploring the extent to which data derived from Twitter can reveal more about spatial and temporal behaviours and the meanings attached to these locally. This is done with a longer-term view to supporting the coproduction and
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Tweet My Street is a cross-disciplinary project exploring the extent to which data derived from Twitter can reveal more about spatial and temporal behaviours and the meanings attached to these locally. This is done with a longer-term view to supporting the coproduction and delivery of local services, complaint mechanisms and horizontal community support networks. The project has involved the development of a web-based software application capable of retrieving, storing and visualising geo-located “tweets” (and associated digital content) from Twitter’s Firehose. This has been piloted in Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) and has proven a scalable tool that can aid the analysis of social media data geographically. Beyond explaining efforts to analyse pilot data via this software, this paper elucidates three methodological challenges encountered during early collaboration. These include issues relating to “proximity” with subjects, ethics and critical questions about scholars’ digital responsibilities during the neogeographic turn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
Open AccessArticle An Ontology of the Appropriate Assessment of Municipal Master Plans Related to Sardinia (Italy)
Future Internet 2014, 6(2), 223-241; doi:10.3390/fi6020223
Received: 6 March 2014 / Revised: 26 March 2014 / Accepted: 11 April 2014 / Published: 23 April 2014
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Abstract
This paper discusses some key points related to the ontology of the “appropriate assessment” [1] procedure concerning plans significantly affecting Natura 2000 sites. We study this ontology by discussing its implementation into the adjustment process of the master plans of the regional municipalities
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This paper discusses some key points related to the ontology of the “appropriate assessment” [1] procedure concerning plans significantly affecting Natura 2000 sites. We study this ontology by discussing its implementation into the adjustment process of the master plans of the regional municipalities of Sardinia (Italy) to the Regional Landscape Plan (RLP) and put as evidence some important general observations, coming from the case study, concerning the utility and effectiveness of the ontological conceptual framework in order to help planners and decision-makers understand and structure the assessment process of plans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
Open AccessArticle Crowdsourcing as a Tool for Knowledge Acquisition in Spatial Planning
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 109-125; doi:10.3390/fi6010109
Received: 21 November 2013 / Revised: 16 January 2014 / Accepted: 10 February 2014 / Published: 5 March 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (275 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The term “crowdsourcing” was initially introduced by Howe in his article “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” [1]. During the last few years, crowdsourcing has become popular among companies, institutions and universities, as a crowd-centered modern “tool” for problem solving. Crowdsourcing is mainly based on
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The term “crowdsourcing” was initially introduced by Howe in his article “The Rise of Crowdsourcing” [1]. During the last few years, crowdsourcing has become popular among companies, institutions and universities, as a crowd-centered modern “tool” for problem solving. Crowdsourcing is mainly based on the idea of an open-call publication of a problem, requesting the response of the crowd for reaching the most appropriate solution. The focus of this paper is on the role of crowdsourcing in knowledge acquisition for planning applications. The first part provides an introduction to the origins of crowdsourcing in knowledge generation. The second part elaborates on the concept of crowdsourcing, while some indicative platforms supporting the development of crowdsourcing applications are also described. The third part focuses on the integration of crowdsourcing with certain web technologies and GIS (Geographic Information Systems), for spatial planning applications, while in the fourth part, a general framework of the rationale behind crowdsourcing applications is presented. Finally, the fifth part focuses on a range of case studies that adopted several crowdsourcing techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Recent Developments and Future Trends in Volunteered Geographic Information Research: The Case of OpenStreetMap
Future Internet 2014, 6(1), 76-106; doi:10.3390/fi6010076
Received: 10 December 2013 / Revised: 10 January 2014 / Accepted: 13 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 28 | PDF Full-text (590 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
User-generated content (UGC) platforms on the Internet have experienced a steep increase in data contributions in recent years. The ubiquitous usage of location-enabled devices, such as smartphones, allows contributors to share their geographic information on a number of selected online portals. The collected
[...] Read more.
User-generated content (UGC) platforms on the Internet have experienced a steep increase in data contributions in recent years. The ubiquitous usage of location-enabled devices, such as smartphones, allows contributors to share their geographic information on a number of selected online portals. The collected information is oftentimes referred to as volunteered geographic information (VGI). One of the most utilized, analyzed and cited VGI-platforms, with an increasing popularity over the past few years, is OpenStreetMap (OSM), whose main goal it is to create a freely available geographic database of the world. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in VGI research, focusing on its collaboratively collected geodata and corresponding contributor patterns. Additionally, trends in the realm of OSM research are discussed, highlighting which aspects need to be investigated more closely in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NeoGeography and WikiPlanning 2014)
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