E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Geographic Information Science and Remote Sensing Techniques for Sustainable Urban and Regional Planning"

Quicklinks

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Beniamino Murgante

School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, 10 Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: spatial planning; spatial simulation; geodemographics; geographic data analysis of socio-economic and population data; planning 2.0; participation 2.0; e-democracy; e-participation
Guest Editor
Dr. Giuseppe Borruso

DEAMS - Department of Economic, Business, Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via A. Valerio, 4/1, 34127 Trieste, Italy
E-Mail
Fax: +39 040 558 7009
Interests: GIS; spatial analysis; geostatistics; network spatial analysis; GI & socioeconomics; economic and business geography; retail geography; geodemographics
Guest Editor
Dr. Maurizio Pollino

ENEA-Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Earth Observations and Analyses Lab (UTMEA-TER), Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +39 06 3048 3362
Interests: remote sensing; GIS; WebGIS; spatial analysis; land use/land cover analysis; urban planning; landscape metrics and indices; DSS-Decision Support Systems; natural hazards; vulnerability analysis and risk assessment
Guest Editor
Dr. Federico Martellozzo

Labex Futurs Urbains-Université Paris Est, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, LVMT-Bâtiment Bienvenue, 6 et 8 avenue Blaise Pascal, 77455 Marne la Vallée Cedex 2, France
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +39 06 3048 3362
Interests: land-cover change; urban sprawl; sustainable development; human consumption of resources and Earth's resilience; fuel vulnerability; food security

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ensemble of GI methodologies—mainly Geographic Information Science (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS)—are fundamental tools for observing and investigating the dynamics of territorial phenomena. Such phenomena include urban sprawl, soil degradation and consumption, changes in land cover patterns, landscape fragmentation, etc. Thus, these methodologies enrich the geographical information available and support the development of more exhaustive environmental assessments. The aforementioned phenomena to be studied touch upon issues that are critical in our current “anthropocene” age. The world population is growing at an unprecedented pace, and the rural-to-urban population shift does not seem to be stopping anytime soon. Moreover, human activities are still the major cause of global environmental change. We believe GI technologies constitute an essential backbone for implementing interdisciplinary methodological workflows, so as to provide for and deepen our understanding of human/environment interrelations.

GI techniques represent the core of this sort of analysis, and constitute an efficient way of correlating several dimensions (such as territorial, ecological, socio-economic, etc.). These techniques thus foster sustainable development planning and monitoring.

The current wide diffusion of electronic devices that contain geo-referenced information has resulted in the mass production and availability of spatial data. In fact, Volunteered Geographic Information activities (e.g., OpenStreetMap, Wikimapia, etc.), public initiatives (e.g., Open data, Spatial Data Infrastructures, Geo-portals, etc.) and private projects (e.g., Google Earth, Bing Maps, etc.) have all contributed to an overabundance of spatial data. On the one hand, the base of information available has greatly expanded; but on the other hand, this might also result in increased system complexity, longer computing times, decreased efficiency for the research framework, and more complex decision-making processes. The increase of geographical data availability has not been fully coupled with an increase of knowledge to support spatial decisions. Spatial modelling, Geo-Computational techniques, and geographical analyses are therefore required for data analysis and for facilitating the decision-making process at all levels.

This Special Issue aims to provide an innovative and original contribution to the on-going debate in regards to the above mentioned issues. Furthermore, it will focus on the process of geo-spatial knowledge acquisition, as accomplished through the development of new techniques and methods, which has the goal of efficiently supporting policy decision-making and urban/regional planning at all scales.

Dr. Beniamino Murgante
Dr. Giuseppe Borruso
Dr. Maurizio Pollino
Dr. Federico Martellozzo
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 900 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • geographic Information (GI) technologies and Systems
  • GeoComputation
  • remote sensing
  • geomatics
  • spatial data analysis
  • simulation models and techniques
  • geo-statistics and spatial simulation
  • space-temporal Modelling
  • geo-visual analytics, visual exploratory data analysis
  • environmental Modelling
  • spatial Decision Support Systems
  • geomatics for Risk Assessment and Emergency Management
  • sustainable Development
  • sustainable urban and landscape planning
  • smart Cities

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Application of Geo-Information Techniques in Land Use and Land Cover Change Analysis in a Peri-Urban District of Ghana
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2015, 4(3), 1265-1289; doi:10.3390/ijgi4031265
Received: 16 December 2014 / Revised: 23 June 2015 / Accepted: 20 July 2015 / Published: 28 July 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1140 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System, this paper analyzes the land use and land cover change dynamics in the Bosomtwe District of Ghana, for 1986, 2010 thematic mapper and enhanced thematic Mapper+ (TM/ETM+) images, and 2014 Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager
[...] Read more.
Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System, this paper analyzes the land use and land cover change dynamics in the Bosomtwe District of Ghana, for 1986, 2010 thematic mapper and enhanced thematic Mapper+ (TM/ETM+) images, and 2014 Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager and Thermal Infrared Sensor (OLI/TIS) image. The three images were geo-referenced and processed for classification, using the maximum likelihood classifier algorithm. A Jeffries-Matusita’s separability check was used in confirming the degree of spectral separation acceptability of the bands used for each of the land use and land cover classes. The best Kappa hat statistic of classification accuracy was 83%. Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) transition analysis in Environmental Systems Research Institute ESRI’s ArcMap was performed. The results of the classification over the three periods showed that built up, bare land and concrete surfaces increased from 1201 in 1986 to 5454 ha in 2010. Dense forest decreased by 2253 ha over the same period and increased by 873 ha by the 2014. Low forest also decreased by 1043 ha in 2010; however, it increased by 13% in 2014. Our findings showed some of the important changes in the land use and land cover patterns in the District. After the urbanization process, coupled with farmland abandonment, between 1986 and 2010, substantial increments in urban land and clear increments in farmland coverage between 1986 and 2014were found to be the reason for vegetation cover decreases. This suggests that major changes in the socio-ecological driving forces affecting landscape dynamics have occurred in the last few decades. Full article
Open AccessArticle Urban Morphological Change Analysis of Dhaka City, Bangladesh, Using Space Syntax
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(4), 1412-1444; doi:10.3390/ijgi3041412
Received: 5 June 2014 / Revised: 18 November 2014 / Accepted: 26 November 2014 / Published: 18 December 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (17890 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article is based on a study of the morphological changes of Dhaka City, the capital of Bangladesh. The main objective of the research is to study the transformation of urban morphology in Dhaka City from 1947 to 2007. Three sample wards (18,
[...] Read more.
This article is based on a study of the morphological changes of Dhaka City, the capital of Bangladesh. The main objective of the research is to study the transformation of urban morphology in Dhaka City from 1947 to 2007. Three sample wards (18, 19 and 72) of Dhaka City Corporation are strategically selected as the study areas. Ward 72 has an indigenous type of organic settlement, whereas ward 19 is a planned area, and ward 18 represents a mixed (both planned and informal) type of settlement. In this research, the transformation of urban settlement pattern is examined through space syntax. The results show that the organic settlements (ward 72) are highly integrated both in terms of the local and global syntactic measures (lowest standard deviation for local and global integration, with the highest intelligibility values), and are more connectivity. The scenario is opposite in the case of planned settlements. The characteristics of mixed areas (ward 18) lie in between the organic and planned settlements. Therefore, in summary, it can be stated that the integration, connectivity and intelligibility measures of Dhaka City are found to be high, medium and low for the indigenous, mixed and planned settlement types; respectively. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle The Potential of Urban Agriculture in Montréal: A Quantitative Assessment
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 1101-1117; doi:10.3390/ijgi3031101
Received: 19 May 2014 / Revised: 1 August 2014 / Accepted: 26 August 2014 / Published: 10 September 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (4934 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Growing food in urban areas could solve a multitude of social and environmental problems. These potential benefits have resulted in an increased demand for urban agriculture (UA), though quantitative data is lacking on the feasibility of conversion to large-scale practices. This study uses
[...] Read more.
Growing food in urban areas could solve a multitude of social and environmental problems. These potential benefits have resulted in an increased demand for urban agriculture (UA), though quantitative data is lacking on the feasibility of conversion to large-scale practices. This study uses multiple land use scenarios to determine different spaces that could be allocated to vegetable production in Montréal, including residential gardens, industrial rooftops and vacant space. Considering a range of both soil-bound and hydroponic yields, the ability of these scenarios to render Montréal self-sufficient in terms of vegetable production is assessed. The results show that the island could easily satisfy its vegetable demand if hydroponics are implemented on industrial rooftops, though these operations are generally costly. Using only vacant space, however, also has the potential to meet the city’s demand and requires lower operating costs. A performance index was developed to evaluate the potential of each borough to meet its own vegetable demand while still maintaining an elevated population density. Most boroughs outside of the downtown core are able to satisfy their vegetable demand efficiently due to their land use composition, though results vary greatly depending on the farming methods used, indicating the importance of farm management. Full article
Open AccessArticle A Conceptual List of Indicators for Urban Planning and Management Based on Earth Observation
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 980-1002; doi:10.3390/ijgi3030980
Received: 23 December 2013 / Revised: 4 July 2014 / Accepted: 8 July 2014 / Published: 21 July 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (891 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sustainable development is a key component in urban studies. Earth Observation (EO) can play a valuable role in sustainable urban development and planning, since it represents a powerful data source with the potential to provide a number of relevant urban sustainability indicators. To
[...] Read more.
Sustainable development is a key component in urban studies. Earth Observation (EO) can play a valuable role in sustainable urban development and planning, since it represents a powerful data source with the potential to provide a number of relevant urban sustainability indicators. To this end, in this paper we propose a conceptual list of EO-based indicators capable of supporting urban planning and management. Three cities with different typologies, namely Basel, Switzerland; Tel Aviv, Israel; and Tyumen, Russia were selected as case studies. The EO-based indicators are defined to effectively record the physical properties of the urban environment in a diverse range of environmental sectors such as energy efficiency, air pollution and public health, water, transportation and vulnerability to hazards. The results assess the potential of EO to support the development of a set of urban environmental indicators towards sustainable urban planning and management. Full article
Open AccessArticle Vertical Measurements in Oblique Aerial Imagery
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2014, 3(3), 914-928; doi:10.3390/ijgi3030914
Received: 27 February 2014 / Revised: 5 June 2014 / Accepted: 2 July 2014 / Published: 14 July 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1848 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article first introduces oblique aerial imagery, then describes how vertical distances can be measured once the pixel distances of the original pictures are known. The calculations require that, not only all camera settings be known, but also that one relies on the
[...] Read more.
This article first introduces oblique aerial imagery, then describes how vertical distances can be measured once the pixel distances of the original pictures are known. The calculations require that, not only all camera settings be known, but also that one relies on the availability of detailed digital terrain and digital surface models (DSM and DTM), in order to provide the necessary ground level for calculating vertical distances. The algorithm is finally implemented in an online viewer. Full article
Figures

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
IJGI Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
ijgi@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to IJGI
Back to Top