Special Issue "eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century"

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A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Glenn Finger

Arts, Education and Law Group, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, QLD 4222, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: elearning; technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK); teacher education; ICT trends

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In a globalised knowledge economy, enabled by an increasingly pervasive digital, networked world, elearning possibilities are being explored by educational institutions. Learning and teaching is now able to be designed to enable learning anywhere and at anytime. This opens up exciting possibilities as well as challenges. Consequently, this special issue aims to provide evidence-based guidance through conceptual and research papers focused on elearning and digital futures in the 21st century. Specifically, this special issue calls for papers addressing topics including but not limited to the following:

  • research which can inform evidence-based elearning policy and practice
  • building the technological, pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) capabilities fo educators
  • implications and innovations in assessment approaches using new and emerging technologies
  • the use of student technologies
  • BYOT/BYOD/BYOA
  • in addition to institution-led and teacher-led access to technologies
  • challenges and solutions relating to digital citizenship, such as digital rights and responsibilities, digital literacy, digital law, and digital identity
  • case studies of 'pathfinder' elearning initiatives
  • mobile technologies and mobile applications

Prof. Glenn Finger
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • elearning
  • digital technology
  • digital futures
  • digital citizenship
  • TPACK
  • 21st Century learning
  • assessment

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(3), 209-212; doi:10.3390/educsci4030209
Received: 13 July 2014 / Accepted: 15 July 2014 / Published: 18 July 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (138 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In a globalised knowledge economy, enabled by an increasingly pervasive digital, networked world, eLearning possibilities are being explored by educational institutions. Learning and teaching is now able to be designed to enable learning anywhere and at anytime. This opens up exciting possibilities as
[...] Read more.
In a globalised knowledge economy, enabled by an increasingly pervasive digital, networked world, eLearning possibilities are being explored by educational institutions. Learning and teaching is now able to be designed to enable learning anywhere and at anytime. This opens up exciting possibilities as well as challenges. Consequently, this special issue aimed to provide evidence-based guidance through conceptual and research papers on eLearning and digital futures in the 21st century. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle "E-tivities from the Front Line”: A Community of Inquiry Case Study Analysis of Educators’ Blog Posts on the Topic of Designing and Delivering Online Learning
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 172-192; doi:10.3390/educsci4020172
Received: 5 February 2014 / Accepted: 7 April 2014 / Published: 22 April 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (848 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Designing and implementing successful online learning has been at the forefront of institutional agendas since digital learning increased in market demand over the last decade. However there is still ongoing debate as to the “how” of this arduous task. The Community of Inquiry
[...] Read more.
Designing and implementing successful online learning has been at the forefront of institutional agendas since digital learning increased in market demand over the last decade. However there is still ongoing debate as to the “how” of this arduous task. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) is one learning design method that has seen potential in the field, but practical implementation of designing for the important components of Social, Cognitive and Teaching Presence have yet to be fully realised. This paper researches an e-learning design strategy called E-tivities as a suggested possible method for designing for CoI components. The research explored recent online blog posts of experienced learning designers’ and educators’ experience in designing successful online learning using E-tivities. Results suggest the E-tivities do have the potential to cater for all Presences of CoI. Specifically when using E-tivities to design online learning Affective Expression was the highest reported Social Presence design factor. All four components of Cognitive Presence appeared to be present in E-tivities design. The most important component for adequate Teaching Presence factors was the initial Design and Organisation of the course. E-tivities and the 5-Stage Model provides a solid framework for this to occur. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Mapping the Evolution of eLearning from 1977–2005 to Inform Understandings of eLearning Historical Trends
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 155-171; doi:10.3390/educsci4010155
Received: 4 October 2013 / Accepted: 11 March 2014 / Published: 19 March 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (528 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While there have been very limited studies of the educational computing literature to analyze the research trends since the early emergence of educational computing technologies, the authors argue that it is important for both researchers and educators to understand the major, historical educational
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While there have been very limited studies of the educational computing literature to analyze the research trends since the early emergence of educational computing technologies, the authors argue that it is important for both researchers and educators to understand the major, historical educational computing trends in order to inform understandings of current and future eLearning trends. This study provides the findings of an analysis of 2,694 journal articles published between 1977 and 2005 in four major, international educational computing journals. It provides the platform for a subsequent analysis for the period 2006–2014 and beyond, as future educational computing research is published. The journal articles analyzed were categorized according to their research themes. Subsequently, clustering analysis, multi-dimension scale analysis, and research diversity analysis were performed on the categorized results to explore the research trends. The research literature analysis confirmed that there were identifiable evolutionary trends dating from 1977, and, importantly, the analysis highlighted that each key breakthrough in technology was accompanied by increased educational research about those technologies to inform educational practices. Importantly, two major driving forces of the historical trends identified were technologies and pedagogical approaches. The paper concludes with explanations of how these trends from 1977–2005 have shaped the current focus on Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) needed for effective current and future eLearning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle eLearning and eMaking: 3D Printing Blurring the Digital and the Physical
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 108-121; doi:10.3390/educsci4010108
Received: 30 October 2013 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 24 February 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (454 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article considers the potential of 3D printing as an eLearning tool for design education and the role of eMaking in bringing together the virtual and the physical in the design studio. eLearning has matured from the basics of lecture capture into sophisticated,
[...] Read more.
This article considers the potential of 3D printing as an eLearning tool for design education and the role of eMaking in bringing together the virtual and the physical in the design studio. eLearning has matured from the basics of lecture capture into sophisticated, interactive learning activities for students. At the same time, laptops and internet enabled phones have made computer-based learning mobile, invading classroom learning, changing communication between students, enabling on the spot research, and making the recording of ideas and activities easier. The barriers between online and offline are becoming blurred in a combined digital and physical learning environment. Three-dimensional printing is part of this unification and can be an empowering learning tool for students, changing their relationship with the virtual and the physical, allowing them to take ideas and thinking from screen to reality and back again in an iterative, connected process, however, from an eLearning point of view it is, more importantly, a transformative technology with the potential to change the relationship of the learner to their learning and the scope and nature of their work. Examples from Griffith Product Design student learning illustrate the potential of eMaking to enhance combined learning in a digital age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Digital Tools Disrupting Tertiary Students’ Notions of Disciplinary Knowledge: Cases in History and Tourism
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 87-107; doi:10.3390/educsci4010087
Received: 27 October 2013 / Accepted: 5 February 2014 / Published: 20 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (491 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reports on the findings from a two year research project that explored the potential of digital tools in support of teaching–learning across different disciplinary areas at a New Zealand university. Two courses (in History and Tourism) are case studied using data
[...] Read more.
This paper reports on the findings from a two year research project that explored the potential of digital tools in support of teaching–learning across different disciplinary areas at a New Zealand university. Two courses (in History and Tourism) are case studied using data collected through interviews with lecturers, tutors and their students, and an online student survey. Findings from the research revealed that both lecturers and students were challenged in learning about the affordances and use of the lecturer selected digital tools as a mediational means. The tools were not initially transparent to them, nor were they able to be easily deployed to undertake their primary task—teaching for the lecturers, and, learning and demonstrating learning for the students completing assigned tasks. The process of learning and using the tools disrupted participants’ prior thinking and led to new understandings of both disciplines and of effective pedagogies for the two disciplines. The findings increase our understanding of the ways digital tools can develop, challenge and expand tertiary students learning and have implications for practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Leadership and Reshaping Schooling in a Networked World
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 64-86; doi:10.3390/educsci4010064
Received: 4 October 2013 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 17 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (566 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper is initiated from a position that, until recently, the nature of schooling globally has remained largely unchanged since its design in the last century, and there has been a hegemony that supported its form to be enduring and largely unchanged. However,
[...] Read more.
This paper is initiated from a position that, until recently, the nature of schooling globally has remained largely unchanged since its design in the last century, and there has been a hegemony that supported its form to be enduring and largely unchanged. However, in a digital, networked world, there is a need to rethink and redefine schooling. Following an examination of schooling in the 21st Century, summarising the context and critical challenges presented by new and emerging digital technologies, suggestions about what schooling might look like in an increasingly digital, networked world are presented. Guidance is provided in relation to key questions for leadership to reshape schooling in a networked world, including: -    how might schools move into the networked mode? -    what is required to lead and manage a networked school community? -    how will a networked school become defined less by its physical space and timetabled lessons, but by being networked and that learning can take place anywhere, anytime? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Transforming Future Teaching through ‘Carpe Diem’ Learning Design
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 52-63; doi:10.3390/educsci4010052
Received: 4 November 2013 / Revised: 22 November 2013 / Accepted: 27 December 2013 / Published: 27 January 2014
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (310 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Academic staff in Higher Education (HE) need to transform their teaching practices to support more future-orientated, digital, student-centered learning. Promoting, enabling and implementing these changes urgently requires acceptable, meaningful and effective staff development for academics. We identify four key areas that are presenting
[...] Read more.
Academic staff in Higher Education (HE) need to transform their teaching practices to support more future-orientated, digital, student-centered learning. Promoting, enabling and implementing these changes urgently requires acceptable, meaningful and effective staff development for academics. We identify four key areas that are presenting as barriers to the implementation of successful staff development. We illuminate the Carpe Diem learning design workshop process and illustrate its impact on academic staff as a viable, constructive alternative to traditional staff development processes. The Carpe Diem model directly exposes and addresses the irony that educational institutions expect their academic staff to learn to design and deliver personalized, mobile and technology-enhanced learning to students, whilst wedded to ‘one size fits all’ face-to-face interventions…or worse, ‘page turning’ e-learning that masquerades as staff development. To avoid further frustrations and expensive, inappropriate initiatives, the spirit and practice of Carpe Diem could act as a ‘pathfinder beacon’, and be more widely adopted to enable fast, effective and fully embedded, learner-ready, future-proofed learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
Open AccessArticle Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 36-51; doi:10.3390/educsci4010036
Received: 14 October 2013 / Revised: 9 December 2013 / Accepted: 12 December 2013 / Published: 9 January 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (242 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the
[...] Read more.
There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)

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