Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(1), 36-51; doi:10.3390/educsci4010036
Article

Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership

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Received: 14 October 2013; in revised form: 9 December 2013 / Accepted: 12 December 2013 / Published: 9 January 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue eLearning: Exploring Digital Futures in the 21st Century)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: There are intersections that can occur between the respective peak Australian school education policy agendas. These policies include the use of technologies in classrooms to improve teaching and learning as promoted through the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians and the Australian Curriculum; and the implementation of professional standards as outlined in the Australian Professional Standard for Principals and the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers. These policies create expectations of school leaders to bring about change in classrooms and across their schools, often described as bringing about ‘quality teaching’ and ‘school improvement’. These policies indicate that Australian children should develop ‘democratic values’, and that school principals should exercise ‘democratic values’ in their schools. The national approaches to the implementation of these policies however, is largely silent on promoting learning that fosters democracy through education, or about making connections between teaching and learning with technologies, school leadership and living in a democracy. Yet the policies promote these connections and alignments. Furthermore, understanding democratic values, knowing what is a democracy, and being able to use technologies in democratic ways, has to be learned and practiced. Through the lens of the use of technologies to build digital citizenship and to achieve democratic processes and outcomes in schools, these policy complexities are examined in order to consider some of the implications for school leadership.
Keywords: democracy; technologies; school leadership; digital citizenship; professional standards
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MDPI and ACS Style

Moyle, K. Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership. Educ. Sci. 2014, 4, 36-51.

AMA Style

Moyle K. Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership. Education Sciences. 2014; 4(1):36-51.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Moyle, Kathryn. 2014. "Technologies, Democracy and Digital Citizenship: Examining Australian Policy Intersections and the Implications for School Leadership." Educ. Sci. 4, no. 1: 36-51.

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