Special Issue "Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jan Honzíček

Institute of Chemistry and Technology of Macromolecular Materials, Faculty of Chemical Technology, University of Pardubice, Studentská 573, 532 10 Pardubice, Czech Republic
Website | E-Mail
Interests: air-drying paints and coatings; application of coordination and organometallic compounds in polymer science; infrared and Raman spectroscopy; EPR spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to introduce a new Special Issue of Coatings entitled “Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives”. It is dedicated to highlight new developments in paints, lacquers and varnishes. These coating systems have undergone great evolution in last few decades mainly due to special requirements of end-users and legislation. A quest for lowering emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) could be taken as an example of the pressure on paint producers, which led to great developments of high-solid and water-borne alternatives to traditional solvent-borne formulations. Movements in the field are, of course, not restricted only to solvents and binders but also to pigments, dyes, driers, antioxidants and other additives of commercial paints. Traditional decorative and protective role of pigments is often supplemented with special functions (e.g., self-cleaning and biocide properties). Moreover, many toxic components of industrial and household formulations are replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives (e.g., cobalt-free driers and ketoxime-free antiskinning agents). This Special Issue provides a privileged platform to publish original research articles focused on the most recent findings in the field related to paints, lacquers and varnishes. Contributions on synthesis, characterization, properties and application of binders, pigments, dyes, driers, antioxidants as well as further additives are particularly welcome.

Prominent researchers in the field from both academia and industry are invited to contribute review articles summarizing the status of the topic and providing a vision for the future.

In particular, the topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Formulations with low VOC content;
  • Pigments and dyes for decorative and protective coatings;
  • High-performance formulations;
  • Paints systems with self-cleaning, self-healing and depollution properties;
  • Cobalt-free driers suitable for air-drying paints;
  • Biocides, surfactants, coalescing agents, rheology modifiers and other additives.

Dr. Jan Honzíček
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Optimization Method for Developing Spectral Controlling Cosmetics: Application for Thermal Barrier Cosmetic
Coatings 2018, 8(8), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8080286
Received: 3 July 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 11 August 2018 / Published: 17 August 2018
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Abstract
In this paper, a method of optimizing a thermal barrier cosmetic and spectral selective cosmetic by controlling the particle size and material is proposed as a countermeasure to heatstroke. The radiative properties of single cosmetic particles of a wide range of particle sizes
[...] Read more.
In this paper, a method of optimizing a thermal barrier cosmetic and spectral selective cosmetic by controlling the particle size and material is proposed as a countermeasure to heatstroke. The radiative properties of single cosmetic particles of a wide range of particle sizes and wavelengths in non-absorbing air were calculated in this study based on the Mie theory. Al2O3, TiO2, Au, and Ag were used as the material of the cosmetic particle. The radiative property of a particle cloud in dependent scattering was calculated. The radiative transfer in the cosmetic layer was analyzed, and the spectral reflectance of the cosmetic layer on the human skin was calculated. A new parameter was defined to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the thermal barrier cosmetic and spectral selective cosmetic. For the thermal barrier cosmetic, the Al2O3 particle was determined to be suitable, and its size was optimized. For the spectral selective cosmetic, the Au particle was likewise determined to be suitable, and its size was optimized. Our cosmetics satisfied both aesthetic and thermal concerns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Application of Oxovanadium Complex Stabilized by N,N,N,N-Chelating Ligand in Air-Drying Paints
Coatings 2018, 8(6), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8060204
Received: 23 April 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 25 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1450 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
New vanadium-based drier, stabilized with macrocyclic chelating ligand, is described. Its drying activity was established on solvent-borne alkyd resins of different oil-length modified by soybean oil. The test coatings were characterized by standardized mechanical tests as well as spectroscopic methods. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy
[...] Read more.
New vanadium-based drier, stabilized with macrocyclic chelating ligand, is described. Its drying activity was established on solvent-borne alkyd resins of different oil-length modified by soybean oil. The test coatings were characterized by standardized mechanical tests as well as spectroscopic methods. Time-resolved infrared spectroscopy was used for determination of kinetic parameters of the autoxidation process while the EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectroscopy enabled confirmation of stability of oxovanadium(IV) species in the cured films. The obtained experimental data revealed promising catalytic activity of the oxovanadium(IV) compound stabilized with N,N,N,N-chelating ligand at low concentration. At 0.03 wt % of metal in dry matter content, it shows short total dry times not exceeding 12 h while commercial cobalt(II) 2-ethylhexanoate is, at the same concentration, considerably lower active with total dry times 15.4 h (alkyd of short oil-length) and >24 h (alkyd of medium oil-length). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Processing Parameters on the Formation and Properties of Al/Ni Core-Shell Pigments via a Galvanic Displacement Method
Coatings 2018, 8(6), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8060200
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 18 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
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Abstract
Al/Ni bimetallic core-shell pigments with flake Al particle as core and metallic Ni as shell were synthesized via a galvanic displacement method and studied with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron micrograph (SEM), specific surface area analysis (BET), thermogravimetry-differential thermalanalysis (TG/DSC), and visible-near infrared-infrared reflectance
[...] Read more.
Al/Ni bimetallic core-shell pigments with flake Al particle as core and metallic Ni as shell were synthesized via a galvanic displacement method and studied with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron micrograph (SEM), specific surface area analysis (BET), thermogravimetry-differential thermalanalysis (TG/DSC), and visible-near infrared-infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The influence of reactant ratio (Al:Ni2+) and order of addition on phase structure, surface morphology, optical properties, and high temperature oxidation resistance properties were studied systematically. The results show that the local concentration of Ni2+ at solid-liquid interfaces can be effectively modulated by adjusting the reactant ratio and order of addition. A high local concentration of Ni2+ improves the rate of displacement reaction resulting in more metallic Ni on the surface of the flake Al powders. This increases the relative content of Ni in the shell. The change of displacement reaction rate also leads to a different surface morphology and roughness of the Ni shell. The thick and rough Ni shell has a strong absorption extinction due to the intense light scattering and absorption-this substantially reduces the spectral reflectance of the flake Al core. Infrared reflectance in particular is influenced by light scattering and absorption of the rough surface. In addition, the Ni shell can enhance the high temperature oxidation resistance of the Al core by preventing contact between the metallic Al substrate and oxygen. The oxidation resistance is also associated with the processing parameters of the galvanic displacement reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Open AccessArticle Nano Diesel Soot Particles Reduce Wear and Friction Performance Using an Oil Additive on a Laser Textured Surface
Received: 24 November 2017 / Revised: 4 February 2018 / Accepted: 6 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
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Abstract
Tribological properties of nano diesel soot (DS) as an additive were investigated. Textures in linear radiating arrays were prepared on the surface of a spring-steel plate by laser radiation. The texture densities were 19.6%, 22.1%, and 44.2%, and the depth was 30 μm.
[...] Read more.
Tribological properties of nano diesel soot (DS) as an additive were investigated. Textures in linear radiating arrays were prepared on the surface of a spring-steel plate by laser radiation. The texture densities were 19.6%, 22.1%, and 44.2%, and the depth was 30 μm. The results indicated that the textured surface was interacted with additive favorably to improve its tribological performance. Friction coefficients and wear rates of textured surfaces with additive in oil were generally much lower compared to the original surface without additive. The higher area density of the textured surface with the additive in oil had the lowest friction coefficient, as low as 0.12, and also the minimum wear rate, as low as 1 × 103 μm/N·m in 100 °C, to be achievable. Such results can be attributed to the formation of the tribo-film and the storage function of the micro-dimple. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Open AccessCommunication A Note on the Dyeing of Wool Fabrics Using Natural Dyes Extracted from Rotten Wood-Inhabiting Fungi
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 7 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 19 February 2018
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Abstract
Fungal isolates obtained from rotten wood samples were identified and selected by their ability to produce fungal dyes in liquid media. Fungal isolates produced natural extracellular dyes with colors ranging from red to orange, yellow and purple. Dyes from two of these fungi,
[...] Read more.
Fungal isolates obtained from rotten wood samples were identified and selected by their ability to produce fungal dyes in liquid media. Fungal isolates produced natural extracellular dyes with colors ranging from red to orange, yellow and purple. Dyes from two of these fungi, Talaromyces australis (red) and Penicillium murcianum (yellow), were extracted and used to dye wool samples in a Data Color Ahiba IR Pro-Trade (model Top Speed II) machine. The protein nature of wool interacted well with the fungal dyes producing colors suitable for textile applications when used to a concentration of 0.1 g·L−1. Results on color fastness when washing confirmed the affinity of the dyes with wool as the dyed samples kept their color in acceptable ranges after washing, without the implementation of mordanting pretreatments or the use of fixing agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Open AccessArticle Thermoplastic Polyurethanes Stemming from Castor Oil: Green Synthesis and Their Application in Wood Bonding
Coatings 2017, 7(10), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7100159
Received: 27 July 2017 / Revised: 12 September 2017 / Accepted: 21 September 2017 / Published: 29 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2065 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We report an efficient and green approach to synthesize a linear castor oil-based polyurethane (CPU) without using any solvent or catalyst. Diol monomers were first synthesized by the aminolysis reaction between castor oil and diamines; this was accomplished within 6 h at 130
[...] Read more.
We report an efficient and green approach to synthesize a linear castor oil-based polyurethane (CPU) without using any solvent or catalyst. Diol monomers were first synthesized by the aminolysis reaction between castor oil and diamines; this was accomplished within 6 h at 130 °C. Polymerization of the diols and isocyanate was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), and gel permeation chromatography analyses. The resultant CPUs showed a good thermal stability with an initial degradation temperature higher than 300 °C, and their mechanical and wood bonding property can be modulated by the structures of diamine. In addition, the CPUs possessed a satisfying water resistance property with the water absorption amount lower than 2%. The green conversion of castor oil to thermoplastic polyurethane affords new opportunities in bio-based industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Open AccessArticle Wood-Rotting Fungal Pigments as Colorant Coatings on Oil-Based Textile Dyes
Coatings 2017, 7(10), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7100152
Received: 4 August 2017 / Revised: 19 September 2017 / Accepted: 20 September 2017 / Published: 23 September 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1183 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Opportunities for alternatives to synthetic textile dyes are of increasing importance as the world looks to minimize its ecological footprint. Fungal pigments within a unique class of wood-rotting (“spalting”) fungi have been under investigation for several years as a possible solution, and have
[...] Read more.
Opportunities for alternatives to synthetic textile dyes are of increasing importance as the world looks to minimize its ecological footprint. Fungal pigments within a unique class of wood-rotting (“spalting”) fungi have been under investigation for several years as a possible solution, and have been shown to be ideally suited as textile dye coatings. Unfortunately, the solvent currently in use for these colorants is dichloromethane (DCM), which is an environmental problem as well as a potential human carcinogen. Recently, researchers found that the pigments from Chlorociboria species, Scytalidium cuboideum, and Scytalidium ganodermophthorum could be carried in some natural oils, which opened up a potential method of delivering pigments onto a host of substrates without utilizing DCM. Although the pigments can be carried in oil, no testing has thus far been conducted as to how oil affects the binding properties of the pigments onto textiles, or how the oil might affect the pigments directly. In this paper, the pigments produced by three well-known wood-rotting fungi were carried in raw linseed oil and applied to cotton, polyester, and nylon. Only the red pigment produced visible color change on the textiles. Cotton and polyester showed the greatest color change when the pigments were dripped onto the fabric, while polyester showed the most color when the textile was submerged into the pigment solution. Unfortunately, the colors faded significantly for all the tests except the saturation test. This indicates that while natural oils may be excellent, nontoxic alternative carriers for DCM, the pigments are not stable within them except at very high concentrations, and therefore natural oils—including raw linseed oil—are not ideal for use in conjunction with these pigments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Binders, Pigments, Dyes and Additives)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: Bàrbara Micó-Vicent
Title: Finding the additives incorporation moment in hybrid natural pigments synthesis for improve bioresin properties
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