Special Issue "Photonic Sensors for Biological and Chemical Measurements"

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A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr Yu-Lung Lo

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystem Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: optical sensors; quantum dots sensors; nanostructures for chemical sensing; fluorescence sensors; biosensors
Guest Editor
Dr. Julian Chi Chiu Chan

Division of Bioengineering, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637457, Singapore
Website | E-Mail
Interests: optical chemical sensing; optical bio-sensing; optical sensing devices; optical signal processing; medical image processing; optical image processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The guided wave optics device for photonic sensors (including optical fiber sensors, planar waveguide sensors, and optical sensors) has been intensively studied over two decades for applications in biological and chemical measurements. Photonic sensors may be built based on different mechanisms such as intensity-based, phase-based, polarization-based, wavelength-based, Raman scattering-based, spectroscopic, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence emitted types. Progress in designing photonic sensors continues with new mechanism and guided wave optics device in different new fields. Thus, the special issue of journal of Chemosensors includes:

  • sensors based on optics/planar waveguide/ novel fibers including photonic crystal fiber, photonic bandgap fiber, and other specialty fiber like micro-nano fiber
  • novel demodulation techniques
  • applications in relatively new areas such as biomedical engineering and chemical engineering.

This special issue will give the reader some of the exciting areas of photonic sensors with this collection of innovative research articles. There will be no fees for all manuscripts in this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Yu-Lung Lo
Dr. Julian Chi Chiu Chan
Guest Editor
s

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Photonic Crystal-Based Sensing and Imaging of Potassium Ions
Chemosensors 2014, 2(3), 207-218; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2030207
Received: 28 April 2014 / Revised: 4 August 2014 / Accepted: 9 September 2014 / Published: 18 September 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (352 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We report on a method for selective optical sensing and imaging of potassium ions using a sandwich assembly composed of layers of photonic crystals and an ion-selective membrane. This represents a new scheme for sensing ions in that an ionic strength-sensitive photonic crystal
[...] Read more.
We report on a method for selective optical sensing and imaging of potassium ions using a sandwich assembly composed of layers of photonic crystals and an ion-selective membrane. This represents a new scheme for sensing ions in that an ionic strength-sensitive photonic crystal hydrogel layer is combined with a K+-selective membrane. The latter consists of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) doped with the K+-selective ion carrier, valinomycin. The film has a red color if immersed into plain water, but is green in 5 mM KCl and purple at KCl concentrations of 100 mM or higher. This 3D photonic crystal sensor responds to K+ ions in the 1 to 50 mM concentration range (which includes the K+ concentration range encountered in blood) and shows high selectivity over ammonium and sodium ions. Sensor films were also imaged with a digital camera by exploiting the RGB technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Sensors for Biological and Chemical Measurements)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Discriminating Bacteria with Optical Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Xerogels
Chemosensors 2014, 2(2), 171-181; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2020171
Received: 13 December 2013 / Revised: 12 May 2014 / Accepted: 22 May 2014 / Published: 11 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (808 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
An innovative and low-cost method is proposed for the detection and discrimination of indole-positive pathogen bacteria. The method allows the non-invasive detection of gaseous indole, released by bacteria, with nanoporous colorimetric sensors. The innovation comes from the use of nanoporous matrices doped with
[...] Read more.
An innovative and low-cost method is proposed for the detection and discrimination of indole-positive pathogen bacteria. The method allows the non-invasive detection of gaseous indole, released by bacteria, with nanoporous colorimetric sensors. The innovation comes from the use of nanoporous matrices doped with 4-(dimethylamino)-cinnamaldehyde, which act as sponges to trap and concentrate the targeted analyte and turn from transparent to dark green, long before the colonies get visible with naked eyes. With such sensors, it was possible to discriminate E. coli from H. alvei, two indole-positive and negative bacteria after seven hours of incubation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Sensors for Biological and Chemical Measurements)
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Open AccessArticle A Low-Cost Fluorescent Sensor for pCO2 Measurements
Chemosensors 2014, 2(2), 108-120; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2020108
Received: 16 July 2013 / Revised: 24 December 2013 / Accepted: 21 March 2014 / Published: 3 April 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (632 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Global warming is believed to be caused by increasing amounts of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2) discharged into the environment by human activity. In addition to an increase in environmental temperature, an increased CO2 level has also led to ocean acidification.
[...] Read more.
Global warming is believed to be caused by increasing amounts of greenhouse gases (mostly CO2) discharged into the environment by human activity. In addition to an increase in environmental temperature, an increased CO2 level has also led to ocean acidification. Ocean acidification and rising temperatures have disrupted the water’s ecological balance, killing off some plant and animal species, while encouraging the overgrowth of others. To minimize the effect of global warming on local ecosystem, there is a strong need to implement ocean observing systems to monitor the effects of anthropogenic CO2 and the impacts thereof on ocean biological productivity. Here, we describe the development of a low-cost fluorescent sensor for pCO2 measurements. The detector was exclusively assembled with low-cost optics and electronics, so that it would be affordable enough to be deployed in great numbers. The system has several novel features, such as an ideal 90° separation between excitation and emission, a beam combiner, a reference photodetector, etc. Initial tests showed that the system was stable and could achieve a high resolution despite the low cost. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Sensors for Biological and Chemical Measurements)

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