Special Issue "Nanosensors"

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A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2013)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sherif A. El-Safty

1 National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen 1-2-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047, Japan
2 Graduate School for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mesoporous; nanoengineering designs; nanoscience; optical sensors, removal, detection, green chemistry; catalysts, nonofilters; chemotherapy
Associate Editor
Prof. Dr. Nguyen Duc Hoa

International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology, No. 1, Dai Co Viet Str., Hanoi, Vietnam
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid developments in the studies of nanostructured materials for nanosensors have opened a new strategy in the practical application, and bringing the nanosensors to realized market. Nanosensors, the devices that use nanomaterials to identify biological, chemical, and substances through the variation in physic-chemical properties of materials have some advantages because of almost sensing processes take place on the surface of materials. Nanomaterials provide extensive large surface area to volume ratio, and thus huge active sites for sensing analytic elements. Efforts to design and fabricate of advanced nanomateirals for nanosensors are considered by many researchers. In addition, investigation on nanosensors bring together materials science, electrical engineering, physics, measurement science, information technology, chemistry, and biology together, and applies them to solve problems in health care, industrial process control, and environmental monitoring. For instance, potential application of nanosensors can expand to various fields including of (i) environmental monitoring, water pollutants; (ii) air pollutants, (iii) pathogens in clinical diagnostics applications.

With regard to proximal sensing, this issue considers controlled assessment processes that involve the evaluation of intrinsic properties (e.g., signal change, long-term stability, adsorption efficiency, extraordinary sensitivity, selectivity, and reusability).

To overcome those challenges, extensive studies in design, fundamentals and processing of new nanomaterials for nanosensors of different applications are crucial. Therefore we proposed this Special Issue to encourage researchers worldwide to exchange and report their new results in research and development that focus on the most recent advances in nanostructured materials for (i) gas sensors, (ii) biosensors, (iii) tracing metal ion, and pollutants, as well as (iv) basic transducer principles of nanosensors.

Prof. Dr. Sherif A. El-Safty
Guest Editors
Prof. Dr. Nguyen Duc Hoa
Associate Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • gas sensors, VOC sensors
  • biosensors, Bio assays
  • tracing metal ion
  • nano materials: nanoparticles, nanowires, nanorods, nanotubes, grapheme, carbon nanotubes, mesoporous materials,
  • transducer principles

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Reproducible Design for the Optical Screening and Sensing of Hg(II) Ions
Chemosensors 2014, 2(4), 219-234; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2040219
Received: 1 April 2014 / Revised: 22 September 2014 / Accepted: 25 September 2014 / Published: 24 October 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1276 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We fabricated silica nanotubes with hexagonally ordered mesopores (6 nm) inside a membrane disc with a uniform channel neck size of 200 nm and a longitudinal thickness of 60 μm to design an optical sensor membrane (OSM) for the screening and sensing of
[...] Read more.
We fabricated silica nanotubes with hexagonally ordered mesopores (6 nm) inside a membrane disc with a uniform channel neck size of 200 nm and a longitudinal thickness of 60 μm to design an optical sensor membrane (OSM) for the screening and sensing of extremely toxic Hg(II) ions. The optical detection and quantitative recognition of Hg(II) ions in water were conducted even at trace concentrations without the need for sophisticated instruments. The OSM design was based on the physical interaction of a responsive organic probe with silica pore surfaces followed by strong and selective binding Hg(II)–probe interactions under specific sensing conditions, particularly at pH 5. Ultra-trace concentrations of Hg(II) ions were easily detected with the naked eye using the OSM. The remarkable ion spectral response of Hg(II) ion–OSM ensured the excellent quantification of the OSM for Hg(II) ion sensing over a wide range of concentrations with a detection limit of 1.75 × 10−9 M. This result indicated that low concentrations of Hg(II) ions can be detected with a high sensitivity. One of the key issues of OSM is the Hg(II) ion-selective workability even in the presence of high doses of competitive matrices and species. The OSM design showed significant Hg(II) ion-sensing capability despite the number of reuse/recycles using simple decomplexation. Given its high selectivity, fast response, and sensitivity, the OSM could be developed into a specific Hg(II) ion-sensing kit in aqueous solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosensors)
Open AccessArticle The Shell Structure Effect on the Vapor Selectivity of Monolayer-Protected Gold Nanoparticle Sensors
Chemosensors 2014, 2(1), 85-96; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2010085
Received: 12 December 2013 / Revised: 22 January 2014 / Accepted: 7 February 2014 / Published: 28 February 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (375 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Four types of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs) were synthesized and characterized as active layers of vapor sensors. An interdigitated microelectrode (IDE) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used to measure the electrical resistance and mass loading changes of MPC films during vapor sorption.
[...] Read more.
Four types of monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs) were synthesized and characterized as active layers of vapor sensors. An interdigitated microelectrode (IDE) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) were used to measure the electrical resistance and mass loading changes of MPC films during vapor sorption. The vapor sensing selectivity was influenced by the ligand structure of the monolayer on the surface of gold nanoparticles. The responses of MPC-coated QCM were mainly determined according to the affinity between the vapors and surface ligands of MPCs. The responses to the resistance changes of the MPC films were due to the effectiveness of the swelling when vapor was absorbed. It was observed that resistive sensitivity to polar organics could be greatly enhanced when the MPC contained ligands that contain interior polar functional groups with exterior nonpolar groups. This finding reveals that reducing interparticle attraction by using non-polar exterior groups could increase effective swelling and therefore enhance the sensitivity of MPC-coated chemiresistors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosensors)
Open AccessCommunication Selectivity of Chemoresistive Sensors Made of Chemically Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Random Networks for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)
Chemosensors 2014, 2(1), 26-40; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2010026
Received: 11 October 2013 / Revised: 17 December 2013 / Accepted: 3 January 2014 / Published: 15 January 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1082 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Different grades of chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been processed by spraying layer-by-layer (sLbL) to obtain an array of chemoresistive transducers for volatile organic compound (VOC) detection. The sLbL process led to random networks of CNT less conductive, but more sensitive to
[...] Read more.
Different grades of chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been processed by spraying layer-by-layer (sLbL) to obtain an array of chemoresistive transducers for volatile organic compound (VOC) detection. The sLbL process led to random networks of CNT less conductive, but more sensitive to vapors than filtration under vacuum (bucky papers). Shorter CNT were also found to be more sensitive due to the less entangled and more easily disconnectable conducting networks they are making. Chemical functionalization of the CNT’ surface is changing their selectivity towards VOC, which makes it possible to easily discriminate methanol, chloroform and tetrahydrofuran (THF) from toluene vapors after the assembly of CNT transducers into an array to make an e-nose. Interestingly, the amplitude of the CNT transducers’ responses can be enhanced by a factor of five (methanol) to 100 (chloroform) by dispersing them into a polymer matrix, such as poly(styrene) (PS), poly(carbonate) (PC) or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). COOH functionalization of CNT was found to penalize their dispersion in polymers and to decrease the sensors’ sensitivity. The resulting conductive polymer nanocomposites (CPCs) not only allow for a more easy tuning of the sensors’ selectivity by changing the chemical nature of the matrix, but they also allow them to adjust their sensitivity by changing the average gap between CNT (acting on quantum tunneling in the CNT network). Quantum resistive sensors (QRSs) appear promising for environmental monitoring and anticipated disease diagnostics that are both based on VOC analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosensors)
Open AccessArticle Reliability of Sensors Based on Nanowire Networks When the Electrical Current is Allowed to Move in All Directions
Chemosensors 2014, 2(1), 13-25; doi:10.3390/chemosensors2010013
Received: 20 October 2013 / Revised: 3 December 2013 / Accepted: 16 December 2013 / Published: 9 January 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (647 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanowire networks have great potential in many industrial applications, including batteries, electrical circuits, solar cells, and sensors. In this paper we focus on a specific hydrogen gas nanosensor whose sensing element is a network of palladium nanowires. The nanosensor is modeled using a
[...] Read more.
Nanowire networks have great potential in many industrial applications, including batteries, electrical circuits, solar cells, and sensors. In this paper we focus on a specific hydrogen gas nanosensor whose sensing element is a network of palladium nanowires. The nanosensor is modeled using a square, equilateral triangle, and hexagonal lattice. We provide the reliability behavior of this nanosensor when the electrical current is allowed to move in all directions. Our findings reveal an improvement in reliability compared to the scenario where the electrical current could not move from right to left. We show this improvement both analytically and through simulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanosensors)

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