Special Issue "New Concepts in Oxidation Processes"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Eric Genty

Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide (UCCS), UMR CNRS 8181, Université Lille 1, Sciences et Technologies, 59000 Lille, France
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Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; total catalytic oxidation; mixed oxides; hydrotalcite like compounds
Guest Editor
Dr. Ciro Bustillo-Lecompte

Department of Chemical Engineering and School of Occupational and Public Health, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada
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Interests: advanced oxidation processes; water, soil, and air quality; advanced treatment of water and wastewater; heterogeneous catalysis
Guest Editor
Dr. Cédric Barroo

Chemical Physics of Materials and Catalysis (CPMCT), Université Libre de Bruxelles, CP 243, 1050 Brussels, Belgium
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Interests: surface science; environmental microscopy; heterogeneous catalysis; nonlinear chemistry; nanocatalysis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Renaud Cousin

Unité de Chimie Environmentale et Interactions sur le Vivant (UCEIV EA 4492), 145 Avenue Maurice Schumann, 59140 Dunkerque, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: VOC total oxidation; heterogeneous catalysis; environmental catalysis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jose Colina-Márquez

Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de Cartagena, Sede Piedra de Bolívar, Avenida del Consulado 48-152, Cartagena, Colombia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; thin films and nanotechnology; chemical reaction engineering; adsorption

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The oxidation processes in the field of catalysis take a major role in both industrial chemistry and environmental protection. Indeed, for the latter, the total oxidation reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hydrocarbons is critical for pollution control in industrial processes and mobile sources. The presence of a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds (e.g., CO, VOC, NOx, SOx, among others) affects the difficulty to obtain stable, active, and selective catalytic materials. A second way to eliminate these pollutants corresponds to the selective oxidation of these to produce highly valuable chemical compounds such as fuel and alcohols. This methodology has also been used to produce chemical compounds from biomass. Moreover, the development of the photocatalytic or plasma catalysis techniques permits the intensification of low-energy processes.

This Special Issue of Catalysts aims at covering recent progress and novel trends in the field of catalytic oxidation reaction. Topics to be addressed in this special issue include the influence of different parameters on the catalytic activity at various scales (atomic, laboratory, pilot, or industrial scale), the development of new catalytic material of environmental or industrial importance, as well as the development of new methods, both microscopic and spectroscopic, to analyze oxidation processes.

Authors with expertise in these topics are cordially invited to submit their manuscripts to Catalysts. Significant full original papers and review articles are welcome.

Dr. Eric Genty
Dr. Ciro Bustillo-Lecompte
Dr. Cédric Barroo
Prof. Dr. Renaud Cousin
Prof. Dr. Jose Colina-Márquez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Total Oxidation
  • Selective Oxidation
  • Advanced Oxidation Processes
  • Photocatalysis
  • Operando Study
  • Biomass
  • Hydrocarbon
  • VOC

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Degradation and Loss of Antibacterial Activity of Commercial Amoxicillin with TiO2/WO3-Assisted Solar Photocatalysis
Catalysts 2018, 8(6), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8060222
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 17 May 2018 / Accepted: 21 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2668 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, a TiO2 catalyst, modified with tungsten oxide (WO3), was synthesized to reduce its bandgap energy (Eg) and to improve its photocatalytic performance. For the catalyst evaluation, the effect of the calcination temperature on the solar
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In this study, a TiO2 catalyst, modified with tungsten oxide (WO3), was synthesized to reduce its bandgap energy (Eg) and to improve its photocatalytic performance. For the catalyst evaluation, the effect of the calcination temperature on the solar photocatalytic degradation was analyzed. The experimental runs were carried out in a CPC (compound parabolic collector) pilot-scale solar reactor, following a multilevel factorial experimental design, which allowed analysis of the effect of the calcination temperature, the initial concentration of amoxicillin, and the catalyst load on the amoxicillin removal. The most favorable calcination temperature for the catalyst performance, concerning the removal of amoxicillin, was 700 °C; because it was the only sample that showed the rutile phase in its crystalline structure. Regarding the loss of the antibiotic activity, the inhibition tests showed that the treated solution of amoxicillin exhibited lower antibacterial activity. The highest amoxicillin removal achieved in these experiments was 64.4% with 100 ppm of amoxicillin concentration, 700 °C of calcination temperature, and 0.1 g L−1 of catalyst load. Nonetheless, the modified TiO2/WO3 underperformed compared to the commercial TiO2 P25, due to its low specific surface and the particles sintering during the sol-gel synthesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts in Oxidation Processes)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Photocatalytic Degradation of Commercial Acetaminophen: Evaluation, Modeling, and Scaling-Up of Photoreactors
Catalysts 2018, 8(5), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8050179
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 24 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 28 April 2018
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Abstract
In this work, the performance of a pilot-scale solar CPC reactor was evaluated for the degradation of commercial acetaminophen, using TiO2 P25 as a catalyst. The statistical Taguchi’s method was used to estimate the combination of initial pH and catalyst load while
[...] Read more.
In this work, the performance of a pilot-scale solar CPC reactor was evaluated for the degradation of commercial acetaminophen, using TiO2 P25 as a catalyst. The statistical Taguchi’s method was used to estimate the combination of initial pH and catalyst load while tackling the variability of the solar radiation intensity under tropical weather conditions through the estimation of the signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of the controllable variables. Moreover, a kinetic law that included the explicit dependence on the local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) was used. The radiant field was estimated by joining the Six Flux Model (SFM) with a solar emission model based on clarity index (KC), whereas the mass balance was coupled to the hydrodynamic equations, corresponding to the turbulent regime. For scaling-up purposes, the ratio of the total area-to-total-pollutant volume (AT/VT) was varied for observing the effect of this parameter on the overall plant performance. The Taguchi’s experimental design results showed that the best combination of initial pH and catalyst load was 9 and 0.6 g L−1, respectively. Also, full-scale plants would require far fewer ratios of AT/VT than for pilot or intermediate-scale ones. This information may be beneficial for reducing assembling costs of photocatalytic reactors scaling-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts in Oxidation Processes)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The CoAlCeO Mixed Oxide: An Alternative to Palladium-Based Catalysts for Total Oxidation of Industrial VOCs
Catalysts 2018, 8(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8020064
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 1 February 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 6 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2744 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Catalytic total oxidation is an effective technique for the treatment of industrial VOCs principally resulting from industrial processes using solvents, and usually containing mono-aromatics (BTEX) and oxygenated compounds (acetone, ethanol, butanone). The catalytic total oxidation of VOCs on noble metal materials is effective.
[...] Read more.
Catalytic total oxidation is an effective technique for the treatment of industrial VOCs principally resulting from industrial processes using solvents, and usually containing mono-aromatics (BTEX) and oxygenated compounds (acetone, ethanol, butanone). The catalytic total oxidation of VOCs on noble metal materials is effective. However, the cost of catalysts is a main obstacle for the industrial application of these VOC removal processes. Therefore, the aim of this work is to propose an alternative material to palladium-based catalysts (which are suitable for VOCs’ total oxidation): a mixed oxide synthesized in the hydrotalcite way, namely CoAlCeO. This material was compared to four catalytic materials containing palladium, selected according to the literature: Pd/α-Al2O3, Pd/HY, Pd/CeO2 and Pd/γ­Al2O3. These materials have been studied for the total oxidation of toluene, butanone, and VOCs mixtures. Catalysts’ performances were compared, taking into account the oxidation byproducts emitted from the process. This work highlight that the CoAlCeO catalyst presents better efficiency than Pd-based materials for the total oxidation of a VOCs mixture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts in Oxidation Processes)
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Open AccessArticle Catalytic Activity Studies of Vanadia/Silica–Titania Catalysts in SVOC Partial Oxidation to Formaldehyde: Focus on the Catalyst Composition
Catalysts 2018, 8(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8020056
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 27 January 2018 / Accepted: 29 January 2018 / Published: 2 February 2018
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Abstract
In this work, silica–titania supported catalysts were prepared by a sol–gel method with various compositions. Vanadia was impregnated on SiO2-TiO2 with different loadings, and materials were investigated in the partial oxidation of methanol and methyl mercaptan to formaldehyde. The materials
[...] Read more.
In this work, silica–titania supported catalysts were prepared by a sol–gel method with various compositions. Vanadia was impregnated on SiO2-TiO2 with different loadings, and materials were investigated in the partial oxidation of methanol and methyl mercaptan to formaldehyde. The materials were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), NH3-TPD, and Raman techniques. The activity results show the high importance of an optimized SiO2-TiO2 ratio to reach a high reactant conversion and formaldehyde yield. The characteristics of mixed oxides ensure a better dispersion of the active phase on the support and in this way increase the activity of the catalysts. The addition of vanadium pentoxide on the support lowered the optimal temperature of the reaction significantly. Increasing the vanadia loading from 1.5% to 2.5% did not result in higher formaldehyde concentration. Over the 1.5%V2O5/SiO2 + 30%TiO2 catalyst, the optimal selectivity was reached at 415 °C when the maximum formaldehyde concentration was ~1000 ppm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts in Oxidation Processes)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Ag/CeO2 Composites for Catalytic Abatement of CO, Soot and VOCs
Catalysts 2018, 8(7), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8070285
Received: 23 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 11 July 2018 / Published: 16 July 2018
PDF Full-text (5215 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Nowadays catalytic technologies are widely used to purify indoor and outdoor air from harmful compounds. Recently, Ag–CeO2 composites have found various applications in catalysis due to distinctive physical-chemical properties and relatively low costs as compared to those based on other noble metals.
[...] Read more.
Nowadays catalytic technologies are widely used to purify indoor and outdoor air from harmful compounds. Recently, Ag–CeO2 composites have found various applications in catalysis due to distinctive physical-chemical properties and relatively low costs as compared to those based on other noble metals. Currently, metal–support interaction is considered the key factor that determines high catalytic performance of silver–ceria composites. Despite thorough investigations, several questions remain debating. Among such issues, there are (1) morphology and size effects of both Ag and CeO2 particles, including their defective structure, (2) chemical and charge state of silver, (3) charge transfer between silver and ceria, (4) role of oxygen vacancies, (5) reducibility of support and the catalyst on the basis thereof. In this review, we consider recent advances and trends on the role of silver–ceria interactions in catalytic performance of Ag/CeO2 composites in low-temperature CO oxidation, soot oxidation, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) abatement. Promising photo- and electrocatalytic applications of Ag/CeO2 composites are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts in Oxidation Processes)
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Open AccessReview Molecular Orientations Change Reaction Kinetics and Mechanism: A Review on Catalytic Alcohol Oxidation in Gas Phase and Liquid Phase on Size-Controlled Pt Nanoparticles
Catalysts 2018, 8(6), 226; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8060226
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 25 May 2018 / Accepted: 26 May 2018 / Published: 27 May 2018
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Abstract
Catalytic oxidation of alcohols is an essential process for energy conversion, production of fine chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates. Although it has been broadly utilized in industry, the basic understanding for catalytic alcohol oxidations at a molecular level, especially under both gas and liquid
[...] Read more.
Catalytic oxidation of alcohols is an essential process for energy conversion, production of fine chemicals and pharmaceutical intermediates. Although it has been broadly utilized in industry, the basic understanding for catalytic alcohol oxidations at a molecular level, especially under both gas and liquid phases, is still lacking. In this paper, we systematically summarized our work on catalytic alcohol oxidation over size-controlled Pt nanoparticles. The studied alcohols included methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 2-butanol. The turnover rates of different alcohols on Pt nanoparticles and also the apparent activation energy in gas and liquid phase reactions were compared. The Pt nanoparticle size dependence of reaction rates and product selectivity was also carefully examined. Water showed very distinct effects for gas and liquid phase alcohol oxidations, either as an inhibitor or as a promoter depending on alcohol type and reaction phase. A deep understanding of different alcohol molecular orientations on Pt surface in gas and liquid phase reactions was established using sum-frequency generation spectroscopy analysis for in situ alcohol oxidations, as well as density functional theory calculation. This approach can not only explain the entirely different behaviors of alcohol oxidations in gas and liquid phases, but can also provide guidance for future catalyst/process design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concepts in Oxidation Processes)
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