Special Issue "Lymphoma"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Georg Lenz (Website)

Medizinische Klinik A, Leiter Translationale Onkologie, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, Gebäude D3, 48149 Münster, Germany
Phone: +49-251-83-56229
Interests: lymphomas, molecular pathogenesis of aggressive lymphomas, NF-kB, gene expression profiling
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Martin Dreyling (Website)

Department of Medicine III, University Hospital Grosshadern/LMU, CCG Leukemia, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich, Germany
Interests: lymphomas, therapy and molecular pathogenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues

Malignant lymphomas represent transformations within the lymphoid system. Various subtypes with divergent biology, morphology, clinical presentation, and prognosis can be distinguished. Despite substantial recent progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of these malignancies, as well as their treatment, still a substantial fraction of affected patients cannot be cured with current therapy. Especially, patients affected by lymphomas that are refractory to conventional immunochemotherapy represent a major clinical problem. Thus, a significantly better understanding of the biology of lymphomagenesis is urgently warranted. This will enable us to incorporate novel molecular targeted therapies into the treatment of affected patients and improve their outcome. This special issue focuses on novel advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to lymphoma development, as well as on the development of novel therapeutic regimens to improve prognosis of affected patients.

Prof. Dr. Georg Lenz
Prof. Dr. Martin Dreyling
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • lymphoma
  • chemotherapy
  • antibodies
  • small molecules
  • biology
  • molecular pathogenesis

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value
Cancers 2015, 7(1), 287-304; doi:10.3390/cancers7010287
Received: 2 November 2014 / Accepted: 21 January 2015 / Published: 28 January 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (778 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the [...] Read more.
Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV), PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG); Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54) of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in %) were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC)-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0%) but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lymphoma)
Open AccessArticle Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Outcomes of Histiocytic and Dendritic Cell Neoplasms: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience Over the Last Twenty Five Years
Cancers 2014, 6(4), 2275-2295; doi:10.3390/cancers6042275
Received: 18 June 2014 / Revised: 25 October 2014 / Accepted: 27 October 2014 / Published: 14 November 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Neoplasms of histiocytic and dendritic cells are rare disorders of the lymph node and soft tissues. Because of this rarity, the corresponding biology, prognosis and terminologies are still being better defined and hence historically, these disorders pose clinical and diagnostic challenges. These [...] Read more.
Neoplasms of histiocytic and dendritic cells are rare disorders of the lymph node and soft tissues. Because of this rarity, the corresponding biology, prognosis and terminologies are still being better defined and hence historically, these disorders pose clinical and diagnostic challenges. These disorders include Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), histiocytic sarcoma (HS), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS), interdigtating cell sarcoma (IDCS), indeterminate cell sarcoma (INDCS), and fibroblastic reticular cell tumors (FRCT). In order to gain a better understanding of the biology, diagnosis, and treatment in these rare disorders we reviewed our cases of these neoplasms over the last twenty five years and the pertinent literature in each of these rare neoplasms. Cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms diagnosed between 1989–2014 were identified using our institutional database. Thirty two cases were included in this analysis and were comprised of the following: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (20/32), histiocytic sarcoma (6/32), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (2/32), interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (2/32), indeterminate dendritic cell sarcoma (1/32), and fibroblastic reticular cell tumor (1/32). Median overall survival was not reached in cases with LCH and showed 52 months in cases with HS, 12 months in cases with FDCS, 58 months in cases with IDCS, 13 months in the case of INDCS, and 51 months in the case of FRCT. The majority of patients had surgical resection as initial treatment (n = 18). Five patients had recurrent disease. We conclude that histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms are very rare and perplexing disorders that should be diagnosed with a combination of judicious morphology review and a battery of immunohistochemistry to rule out mimics such as carcinoma, lymphoma, neuroendocrine tumors and to better sub-classify these difficult to diagnose lesions. The mainstay of treatment for localized disease remains surgical resection and the role of adjuvant therapy is unclear. In patients with multiple areas of involvement, treatment at tertiary care centers with multimodality treatment is likely needed. Accurate subset diagnosis will contribute to better data as well as treatment outcomes analysis of these rare disorders of adult patients in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lymphoma)

Review

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Open AccessReview Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma
Cancers 2015, 7(4), 2318-2329; doi:10.3390/cancers7040893
Received: 17 September 2015 / Revised: 5 November 2015 / Accepted: 17 November 2015 / Published: 25 November 2015
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Abstract
Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly [...] Read more.
Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lymphoma)
Open AccessReview Insights into the Molecular Pathogenesis of Activated B-Cell-like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Its Therapeutic Implications
Cancers 2015, 7(2), 811-822; doi:10.3390/cancers7020812
Received: 23 April 2015 / Accepted: 14 May 2015 / Published: 22 May 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (443 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Within the last couple of years, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has significantly improved. Large-scale gene expression profiling studies have led to the discovery of several molecularly defined subtypes that are [...] Read more.
Within the last couple of years, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has significantly improved. Large-scale gene expression profiling studies have led to the discovery of several molecularly defined subtypes that are characterized by specific oncogene addictions and significant differences in their outcome. Next generation sequencing efforts combined with RNA interference screens frequently identify crucial oncogenes that lead to constitutive activation of various signaling pathways that drive lymphomagenesis. This review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL subtype that is characterized by poor prognosis. A special emphasis is put on findings that might impact therapeutic strategies of affected patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lymphoma)
Open AccessReview Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies
Cancers 2015, 7(2), 736-762; doi:10.3390/cancers7020736
Received: 19 March 2015 / Revised: 21 April 2015 / Accepted: 23 April 2015 / Published: 30 April 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (768 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of [...] Read more.
While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lymphoma)
Open AccessReview Immunreconstitution and Infectious Complications After Rituximab Treatment in Children and Adolescents: What Do We Know and What Can We Learn from Adults?
Cancers 2015, 7(1), 305-328; doi:10.3390/cancers7010305
Received: 31 October 2014 / Revised: 21 January 2015 / Accepted: 23 January 2015 / Published: 29 January 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (406 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is widely used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies in adults and increasingly in pediatric patients. By depleting B-cells, rituximab interferes with humoral immunity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immune reconstitution and infectious complications [...] Read more.
Rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is widely used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies in adults and increasingly in pediatric patients. By depleting B-cells, rituximab interferes with humoral immunity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immune reconstitution and infectious complications after rituximab treatment in children and adolescents. Immune reconstitution starts usually after six months with recovery to normal between nine to twelve months. Extended rituximab treatment results in a prolonged recovery of B-cells without an increase of clinically relevant infections. The kinetic of B-cell recovery is influenced by the concomitant chemotherapy and the underlying disease. Intensive B-NHL treatment such as high-dose chemotherapy followed by rituximab bears a risk for prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia. Overall transient alteration of immune reconstitution and infections after rituximab treatment are acceptable for children and adolescent without significant differences compared to adults. However, age related disparities in the kinetic of immune reconstitution and the definitive role of rituximab in the treatment for children and adolescents with B-cell malignancies need to be evaluated in prospective controlled clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lymphoma)

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