Special Issue "Functional Beverages, from Idea to Functionality"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nenad Naumovski

School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: development of methods of extraction, preservation and purification of a number of bioactives found in foods and food products; development of functional food products
Guest Editor
Dr. Duane Mellor

School of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, UK
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Interests: cocoa; diabetes; cardiovascular risk; obesity; evidence based medicine
Guest Editor
Dr. Senaka Ranadheera

School of Agriculture & Food, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Australia
E-Mail
Interests: Probiotics; prebiotics; dairy products and food quality and safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The original idea of health-promoting foods and beverages is several millennia old, and many different cultures worldwide have practiced the development of beverages with nutraceutical properties. Nowadays, there is an increasing demand, not only for foods as ‘whole foods’, but also for the use of individual and isolated ingredients in the form of purified compounds. In Western society, use of functional beverages is a relatively new concept, and it is predominately orientated towards the fortification/addition of ingredients that can exhibit potential beneficial health effects. Several studies have already identified (or are still under investigation) the beneficial uses of these beverages and have influenced the beverages industry towards mass-scale production.

Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue, “Functional Beverages, from Idea to Functionality” is to compile recent high-quality research manuscripts (letters to the editor, original research and review papers) on functional beverages, covering topics from the generation of ideas, stability studies to animal and human trials, as well as any other functional applications of these types of beverages. This Special Issue is expected to provide up-to-date information on all aspects of research in functional beverages with a main emphasis on potential health benefits.

Dr. Nenad Naumovski
Dr. Duane Mellor
Dr. Senaka Ranadheera
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Effect of Stevia rebaudiana Bert. Addition on the Antioxidant Activity of Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) Juices
Received: 12 June 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
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Abstract
The demand for antioxidant-rich beverages is steadily expanding. At the same time, the possibility of manufacturing products with reduced sugar content, sweetened with natural ingredients, represents a decisive aspect of obtaining quality products with health benefits. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (stevia) is a natural
[...] Read more.
The demand for antioxidant-rich beverages is steadily expanding. At the same time, the possibility of manufacturing products with reduced sugar content, sweetened with natural ingredients, represents a decisive aspect of obtaining quality products with health benefits. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni (stevia) is a natural sweetener that can help to control caloric intake and is also a good source of antioxidant compounds. The present study was designed to assess the feasibility of producing high-quality berry juices sweetened with dry-grinded stevia leaves or their crude extract. The effect of the stevia supplementation on the antioxidant activities of raspberry juices was determined at two different production steps by means of the Folin–Ciocalteu, the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. The addition of stevia significantly increased the antioxidant activity of the juices and resulted in significantly higher ascorbic acid and total phenolic content. A positive correlation was observed between ORAC, CAA, and total phenolic values. These findings show that supplementation with stevia not only promotes a healthy diet by reducing sugar intake but may also enhance the antioxidant potential of the beverage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Beverages, from Idea to Functionality)
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Open AccessArticle The Development of a Menthol Solution for Use during Sport and Exercise
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 7 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
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Abstract
Menthol mouth-swilling has been shown to improve performance across differing exercise modalities, yet no work has been conducted to ascertain the preferred concentration of menthol within a swill. Colour has also been shown to influence psychophysiological outcomes, and may influence the efficacy of
[...] Read more.
Menthol mouth-swilling has been shown to improve performance across differing exercise modalities, yet no work has been conducted to ascertain the preferred concentration of menthol within a swill. Colour has also been shown to influence psychophysiological outcomes, and may influence the efficacy of ergogenic aids. We conducted two experiments: one to ascertain preferred menthol concentration (0.005–0.105% menthol), the second to assess colour preference (Light Blue, Dark Blue, Light Green, Dark Green, Red). Participants rated swills for Smell, Taste, Freshness, Mouth Feel and Irritation (plus Appearance in the second trial) via 15 cm Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), having swilled and expectorated 25 mL of fluid. Both trials employed a crossover design, with tasting order assigned by Latin squares. Differences were assessed for statistical significance (p < 0.05) using one-way repeated measures ANOVAs. Standardised mean differences ±90% confidence intervals were calculated to assess the magnitude of any observed differences. No significant differences were found between concentrations for total VAS score, but higher concentrations demonstrated a greater number of small effects. Similarly, no significant differences between colours were found. Small effects were found when Light Green was compared to Dark Green and Red. Effects were trivial when Light Green was compared to Light Blue (0.05 ± 0.20) and Dark Blue (0.19 ± 0.32). We recommend athletes employ a Light Green or Light Blue 0.1% menthol mouth-swill. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Beverages, from Idea to Functionality)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Development and Quality Evaluation of Ready to Serve (RTS) Beverage from Cape Gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.)
Received: 9 April 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
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Abstract
This study aimed to develop a process for the development of ready to serve (RTS) beverages from enzyme liquefied (pectinase) Cape gooseberry juice with additives and preservatives. Storage stability of the RTS beverage at both refrigerated temperature (LT: 4 ± 1 °C) and
[...] Read more.
This study aimed to develop a process for the development of ready to serve (RTS) beverages from enzyme liquefied (pectinase) Cape gooseberry juice with additives and preservatives. Storage stability of the RTS beverage at both refrigerated temperature (LT: 4 ± 1 °C) and room temperature (RT: 27 ± 2 °C) were evaluated for 90 days for microbial, sensorial and physicochemical quality parameters. The stability of RTS beverage stored at LT (4 ± 1 °C) was excellent with a retention of the primary quality attributes ascorbic acid (15.44 mg/100 mL), total phenolic content (15.50 mg GAE/100 mL), total carotene (1.07 mg/100 mL), β-carotene (0.78 mg/100 mL), high viscosity (30.29 cp), and with high sensory scores of the product (8.3) up to 90 days as compared to the overall acceptability (6.5) of RT stored RTS for 60 days. Additionally, both the LT and RT stored RTS beverages had microbial counts within the permissible limits. Therefore, both beverages were safe to consume at the end of storage duration. In conclusion, the RTS beverage developed from Cape gooseberry could be served as functional health drink alternative to synthetic soft drinks due to its unique features (high nutritive values, high organoleptic values and high stability) of the product. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Beverages, from Idea to Functionality)
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