Special Issue "The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century)"

A special issue of Arts (ISSN 2076-0752). This special issue belongs to the section "Arts and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 September 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Frederic Fol Leymarie

Professor, Department of Computing, Goldsmiths, University of London, London SE14 6NW, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: computer vision and computer graphics; AI; machine learning and creativity; artistically skillful robots; interactive platforms for the biosciences; intersection of the visual arts and live performances with computing, perception, and robots
Editorial Assistant
Mr. G. W. Smith

Founder, Space Machines Corporation, 3443 Esplanade Avenue, Suite 438, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: art; arts and technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the understanding that art, science and technology are continuing to experience an historic and rapidly intensifying rapprochement—but with the understanding as well that accounts thereof have tended to be constrained by scientific/engineering rigor on the one hand, or have tended to swing to the opposite extreme—it is the goal of this special issue of Arts to provide an opportunity for artists, humanists, scientists, and engineers to consider this development from the broader perspective which it deserves, while at the same time retaining a focus on what must surely be the emerging core of our subject: the state of the art in mechatronics and computation is such that we can now begin to speak comfortably of the machine as artist—and we can begin to hope, as well, that an aesthetic sensitivity on the part of the machine might help lead to a friendlier and more sensitive machine intelligence in general.

We invite potential contributors to submit written reports on their experiments, thoughts, new results, experiences at the crossings of art, science and technology, to be considered by our review panel.

Dr. Frederic Fol Leymarie
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • art
  • science
  • technology
  • artificial intelligence
  • aesthetics
  • empathy
  • embodiment
  • creativity

Published Papers (7 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-7
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessEditorial Robot Art: An Interview with Leonel Moura
Received: 16 July 2018 / Accepted: 16 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
PDF Full-text (3438 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the wake of his inclusion in the landmark 2018 “Artists and Robots” show at the Grand Palais in Paris, Leonel Moura reflects herein on his own work and its place within the broad spectrum of techno-art; and of particular current interest is
[...] Read more.
In the wake of his inclusion in the landmark 2018 “Artists and Robots” show at the Grand Palais in Paris, Leonel Moura reflects herein on his own work and its place within the broad spectrum of techno-art; and of particular current interest is his reliance as an artist on emergent phenomenon—i.e., the ability of relatively simple systems to exhibit relatively complex and unexpected capabilities—which has recently come back into focus with the spectacular ability of the “deep learning” family of computer algorithms to perform pattern recognition tasks unthinkable only a few years ago. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Other

Open AccessArticle On Hybrid Creativity
Received: 2 May 2018 / Revised: 20 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
PDF Full-text (1842 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article reviews the development of the author’s computational art practice, where the computer is used both as a device that provides the medium for generation of art (‘computer as art’) as well as acting actively as an assistant in the process of
[...] Read more.
This article reviews the development of the author’s computational art practice, where the computer is used both as a device that provides the medium for generation of art (‘computer as art’) as well as acting actively as an assistant in the process of creating art (‘computer as artist’s assistant’), helping explore the space of possibilities afforded by generative systems. Drawing analogies with Kasparov’s Advanced Chess and the deliberate development of unstable aircraft using fly-by-wire technology, the article argues for a collaborative relationship with the computer that can free the artist to more fearlessly engage with the challenges of working with emergent systems that exhibit complex unpredictable behavior. The article also describes ‘Species Explorer’, the system the author has created in response to these challenges to assist exploration of the possibilities afforded by parametrically driven generative systems. This system provides a framework to allow the user to use a number of different techniques to explore new parameter combinations, including genetic algorithms, and machine learning methods. As the system learns the artist’s preferences the relationship with the computer can be considered to change from one of assistance to collaboration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Choreographic and Somatic Approaches for the Development of Expressive Robotic Systems
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 14 March 2018 / Published: 23 March 2018
PDF Full-text (3246 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As robotic systems are moved out of factory work cells into human-facing environments questions of choreography become central to their design, placement, and application. With a human viewer or counterpart present, a system will automatically be interpreted within context, style of movement, and
[...] Read more.
As robotic systems are moved out of factory work cells into human-facing environments questions of choreography become central to their design, placement, and application. With a human viewer or counterpart present, a system will automatically be interpreted within context, style of movement, and form factor by human beings as animate elements of their environment. The interpretation by this human counterpart is critical to the success of the system’s integration: “knobs” on the system need to make sense to a human counterpart; an artificial agent should have a way of notifying a human counterpart of a change in system state, possibly through motion profiles; and the motion of a human counterpart may have important contextual clues for task completion. Thus, professional choreographers, dance practitioners, and movement analysts are critical to research in robotics. They have design methods for movement that align with human audience perception; they can help identify simplified features of movement that will effectively accomplish human-robot interaction goals; and they have detailed knowledge of the capacity of human movement. This article provides approaches employed by one research lab, specific impacts on technical and artistic projects within, and principles that may guide future such work. The background section reports on choreography, somatic perspectives, improvisation, the Laban/Bartenieff Movement System, and robotics. From this context methods including embodied exercises, writing prompts, and community building activities have been developed to facilitate interdisciplinary research. The results of this work are presented as an overview of a smattering of projects in areas like high-level motion planning, software development for rapid prototyping of movement, artistic output, and user studies that help understand how people interpret movement. Finally, guiding principles for other groups to adopt are posited. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Algorithmic Art Machines
Received: 1 November 2017 / Revised: 8 January 2018 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 15 January 2018
PDF Full-text (438 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The article reviews the author’s personal development in relation to art made by algorithmic machines and discusses both the nature of such systems and the future implications for art. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessEssay Can Computers Create Art?
Received: 4 February 2018 / Revised: 5 May 2018 / Accepted: 7 May 2018 / Published: 10 May 2018
PDF Full-text (8081 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This essay discusses whether computers, using Artificial Intelligence (AI), could create art. First, the history of technologies that automated aspects of art is surveyed, including photography and animation. In each case, there were initial fears and denial of the technology, followed by a
[...] Read more.
This essay discusses whether computers, using Artificial Intelligence (AI), could create art. First, the history of technologies that automated aspects of art is surveyed, including photography and animation. In each case, there were initial fears and denial of the technology, followed by a blossoming of new creative and professional opportunities for artists. The current hype and reality of Artificial Intelligence (AI) tools for art making is then discussed, together with predictions about how AI tools will be used. It is then speculated about whether it could ever happen that AI systems could be credited with authorship of artwork. It is theorized that art is something created by social agents, and so computers cannot be credited with authorship of art in our current understanding. A few ways that this could change are also hypothesized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEssay Art in the Age of Machine Intelligence
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 29 September 2017 / Published: 29 September 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (868 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this wide‐ranging essay, the leader of Google’s Seattle AI group and founder of the Artists and Machine Intelligence program discusses the long‐standing and complex relationship between art and technology. The transformation of artistic practice and theory that attended the 19th century photographic
[...] Read more.
In this wide‐ranging essay, the leader of Google’s Seattle AI group and founder of the Artists and Machine Intelligence program discusses the long‐standing and complex relationship between art and technology. The transformation of artistic practice and theory that attended the 19th century photographic revolution is explored as a parallel for the current revolution in machine intelligence, which promises not only to mechanize (or democratize) the means of reproduction, but also of production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEssay The Machine as Artist: An Introduction
Received: 2 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 10 April 2017
PDF Full-text (1515 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the understanding that art and technology are continuing to experience an historic and rapidly intensifying rapprochement—but with the understanding as well that accounts thereof have tended to be constrained by scientific/engineering rigor on the one hand, or have tended to swing to
[...] Read more.
With the understanding that art and technology are continuing to experience an historic and rapidly intensifying rapprochement—but with the understanding as well that accounts thereof have tended to be constrained by scientific/engineering rigor on the one hand, or have tended to swing to the opposite extreme—it is the goal of this special issue of Arts to provide an opportunity for artists, humanists, scientists, and engineers to consider this development from the broader perspective which it deserves, while at the same time retaining a focus on what must surely be the emerging core of our subject: the state of the art in mechatronics and computation is such that we can now begin to speak comfortably of the machine as artist—and we can begin to hope, as well, that an aesthetic sensitivity on the part of the machine might help lead to a friendlier and more sensitive machine intelligence in general. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Artist (for the 21st Century))
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top