Special Issue "Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Antioxidants (ISSN 2076-3921).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Claus Jacob

Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Saarland University, D-66123 Saarbruecken, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 00496813023129
Interests: intracellular thiolstat; natural nanoparticles, reactive sulfur species; redox modulation; selenium; sensor/effector catalysts
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Cornelia M. Keck

Division of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Philipps University Marburg, D-35032 Marburg, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanocarriers for improved delivery of poorly soluble acitves—nanolipids, nanocrystals; characterization and optimization of nanosystems; pharmaceutical; nutraceutical and cosmetic formulations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last few decades have witnessed considerable advances in nano- and biotechnology. The interface between these two rapidly and successfully expanding areas provides ample opportunities for research in, and development of, new, innovative natural nanoproducts. Indeed, nature itself is an excellent nanotechnologist and endows us with a range of fine particles, from inorganic ash, sooth, sulfur and mineral particles found in the air or in mineral wells, to sulfur and selenium nanoparticles produced by many yeasts and bacteria. It also inspires us to use natural products to manufacture nanomaterials, such as nanocrystals of antioxidants or fine particles of silver, which can be obtained by a range of physical, chemical and even biochemical methods. Many of these natural nanoparticles exhibit pronounced yet specific biological activities. Their potential uses in medicine or agriculture close the cycle of natural materials which are initially harvested or obtained from natural sources and subsequently are applied for various benefits in nature.

This Special Issue will consider the current progress in this field of natural nanomaterials. It will bring together researchers focusing on naturally occuring nanoparticles as well as colleagues interested in nanosizing natural products. In both cases, i.e., natural nanosize materials and nanosized natural materials, the overarching theme will be on applications of these products in medicine, agriculture and related branches, for instance as antioxidants and food supplements in nutrition, as preventive or therapeutic agents in mecidine, in cosmetics, and as phytoprotectants or soil enrichment in agriculture.

Prof. Dr. Claus Jacob
Prof. Dr. Cornelia M. Keck
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antioxidants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural nanoparticles
  • Nanonization of natural products
  • Precipitation
  • Redox
  • Antimicrobial activity
  • Antioxidant activity

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology
Antioxidants 2018, 7(8), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7080101
Received: 24 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 29 July 2018
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Abstract
Since the advent of modern nanotechnology a couple of decades ago, the field of “nano-bio-med” has attracted particular interest, culminating in an almost meteoric rise of common, feasible, more speculative, and, on occasion, outrightly exotic applications of nanomaterials. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Milling the Mistletoe: Nanotechnological Conversion of African Mistletoe (Loranthus micranthus) Intoantimicrobial Materials
Antioxidants 2018, 7(4), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7040060
Received: 24 February 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 18 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3632 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanosizing represents a straight forward technique to unlock the biological activity of complex plant materials. The aim of this study was to develop herbal nanoparticles with medicinal value from dried leaves and stems of Loranthus micranthus with the aid of ball-milling, high speed
[...] Read more.
Nanosizing represents a straight forward technique to unlock the biological activity of complex plant materials. The aim of this study was to develop herbal nanoparticles with medicinal value from dried leaves and stems of Loranthus micranthus with the aid of ball-milling, high speed stirring, and high-pressure homogenization techniques. The milled nanoparticles were characterized using laser diffraction analysis, photon correlation spectroscopy analysis, and light microscopy. The average size of leaf nanoparticles was around 245 nm and that of stem nanoparticles was around 180 nm. The nanoparticles were tested for their antimicrobial and nematicidal properties against a Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, a Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus carnosus, fungi Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a nematode Steinernemafeltiae. The results show significant activities for both leaf and (particularly) stem nanoparticles of Loranthus micranthus on all organisms tested, even at a particle concentration as low as 0.01% (w/w). The results observed indicate that nanoparticles (especially of the stem) of Loranthus micranthus could serve as novel antimicrobial agents with wide-ranging biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle Polymeric Nanoparticles for Increasing Oral Bioavailability of Curcumin
Antioxidants 2018, 7(4), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7040046
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 19 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 24 March 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (22158 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Despite the promising biological and antioxidant properties of curcumin, its medical applications are limited due to poor solubility in water and low bioavailability. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) adapted to oral delivery may overcome these drawbacks. Properties such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology and
[...] Read more.
Despite the promising biological and antioxidant properties of curcumin, its medical applications are limited due to poor solubility in water and low bioavailability. Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) adapted to oral delivery may overcome these drawbacks. Properties such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology and encapsulation efficiency were assessed. Then, the possibility of storing these NPs in a solid-state form obtained by freeze-drying, in vitro curcumin dissolution and cytocompatibility towards intestinal cells were evaluated. Curcumin-loaded Eudragit® RLPO (ERL) NPs showed smaller particle diameters (245 ± 2 nm) and better redispersibility after freeze-drying than either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or polycaprolactone (PCL) NPs. The former NPs showed lower curcumin encapsulation efficiency (62%) than either PLGA or PCL NPs (90% and 99%, respectively). Nevertheless, ERL NPs showed rapid curcumin release with 91 ± 5% released over 1 h. The three curcumin-loaded NPs proposed in this work were also compatible with intestinal cells. Overall, ERL NPs are the most promising vehicles for increasing the oral bioavailability of curcumin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessArticle Resuspendable Powders of Lyophilized Chalcogen Particles with Activity against Microorganisms
Antioxidants 2018, 7(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7020023
Received: 8 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6492 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many organic sulfur, selenium and tellurium compounds show considerable activity against microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. This pronounced activity is often due to the specific, oxidizing redox behavior of the chalcogen-chalcogen bond present in such molecules. Interestingly, similar chalcogen-chalcogen motifs are also found
[...] Read more.
Many organic sulfur, selenium and tellurium compounds show considerable activity against microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. This pronounced activity is often due to the specific, oxidizing redox behavior of the chalcogen-chalcogen bond present in such molecules. Interestingly, similar chalcogen-chalcogen motifs are also found in the elemental forms of these elements, and while those materials are insoluble in aqueous media, it has recently been possible to unlock their biological activities using naturally produced or homogenized suspensions of respective chalcogen nanoparticles. Those suspensions can be employed readily and often effectively against common pathogenic microorganisms, still their practical uses are limited as such suspensions are difficult to transport, store and apply. Using mannitol as stabilizer, it is now possible to lyophilize such suspensions to produce solid forms of the nanoparticles, which upon resuspension in water essentially retain their initial size and exhibit considerable biological activity. The sequence of Nanosizing, Lyophilization and Resuspension (NaLyRe) eventually provides access to a range of lyophilized materials which may be considered as easy-to-handle, ready-to-use and at the same time as bioavailable, active forms of otherwise insoluble or sparingly substances. In the case of elemental sulfur, selenium and tellurium, this approach promises wider practical applications, for instance in the medical or agricultural arena. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Glutathione: Antioxidant Properties Dedicated to Nanotechnologies
Antioxidants 2018, 7(5), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7050062
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 20 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 27 April 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2532 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Which scientist has never heard of glutathione (GSH)? This well-known low-molecular-weight tripeptide is perhaps the most famous natural antioxidant. However, the interest in GSH should not be restricted to its redox properties. This multidisciplinary review aims to bring out some lesser-known aspects of
[...] Read more.
Which scientist has never heard of glutathione (GSH)? This well-known low-molecular-weight tripeptide is perhaps the most famous natural antioxidant. However, the interest in GSH should not be restricted to its redox properties. This multidisciplinary review aims to bring out some lesser-known aspects of GSH, for example, as an emerging tool in nanotechnologies to achieve targeted drug delivery. After recalling the biochemistry of GSH, including its metabolism pathways and redox properties, its involvement in cellular redox homeostasis and signaling is described. Analytical methods for the dosage and localization of GSH or glutathiolated proteins are also covered. Finally, the various therapeutic strategies to replenish GSH stocks are discussed, in parallel with its use as an addressing molecule in drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)
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Open AccessReview Natural Nanoparticles: A Particular Matter Inspired by Nature
Antioxidants 2018, 7(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7010003
Received: 1 December 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (7311 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During the last couple of decades, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has produced a wide palette of nanomaterials, most of which are considered as “synthetic” and, among the wider public, are often met with a certain suspicion. Despite the technological sophistication behind
[...] Read more.
During the last couple of decades, the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology has produced a wide palette of nanomaterials, most of which are considered as “synthetic” and, among the wider public, are often met with a certain suspicion. Despite the technological sophistication behind many of these materials, “nano” does not always equate with “artificial”. Indeed, nature itself is an excellent nanotechnologist. It provides us with a range of fine particles, from inorganic ash, soot, sulfur and mineral particles found in the air or in wells, to sulfur and selenium nanoparticles produced by many bacteria and yeasts. These nanomaterials are entirely natural, and, not surprisingly, there is a growing interest in the development of natural nanoproducts, for instance in the emerging fields of phyto- and phyco-nanotechnology. This review will highlight some of the most recent—and sometimes unexpected—advances in this exciting and diverse field of research and development. Naturally occurring nanomaterials, artificially produced nanomaterials of natural products as well as naturally occurring or produced nanomaterials of natural products all show their own, particular chemical and physical properties, biological activities and promise for applications, especially in the fields of medicine, nutrition, cosmetics and agriculture. In the future, such natural nanoparticles will not only stimulate research and add a greener outlook to a traditionally high-tech field, they will also provide solutions—pardon—suspensions for a range of problems. Here, we may anticipate specific biogenic factories, valuable new materials based on waste, the effective removal of contaminants as part of nano-bioremediation, and the conversion of poorly soluble substances and materials to biologically available forms for practical uses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)
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Other

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Open AccessOpinion Nanotherapy and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in Cancer: A Novel Perspective
Antioxidants 2018, 7(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox7020031
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 19 February 2018 / Published: 22 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (968 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The incidence of numerous types of cancer has been increasing over recent years, representing the second-most frequent cause of death after cardiovascular diseases. Even though, the number of effective anticancer drugs is increasing as well, a large number of patients suffer from severe
[...] Read more.
The incidence of numerous types of cancer has been increasing over recent years, representing the second-most frequent cause of death after cardiovascular diseases. Even though, the number of effective anticancer drugs is increasing as well, a large number of patients suffer from severe side effects (e.g., cardiomyopathies) caused by these drugs. This adversely affects the patients’ well-being and quality of life. On the molecular level, tumor cells that survive treatment modalities can become chemotherapy-resistant. In addition, adverse impacts on normal (healthy, stromal) cells occur concomitantly. Strategies that minimize these negative impacts on normal cells and which at the same time target tumor cells efficiently are needed. Recent studies suggest that redox-based combinational nanotherapies may represent one option in this direction. Here, we discuss recent advances in the application of nanoparticles, alone or in combination with other drugs, as a promising anticancer tool. Such novel strategies could well minimize harmful side effects and improve patients’ health prognoses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inspired by Nature: Antioxidants and Nanotechnology)
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