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Antioxidants, Volume 3, Issue 4 (December 2014), Pages 636-889

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Open AccessArticle Phenolic Content of Hypodaphnis Zenkeri and Its Antioxidant Effects against Fenton Reactions’ Mediated Oxidative Injuries on Liver Homogenate
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 866-889; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040866
Received: 30 September 2014 / Revised: 12 November 2014 / Accepted: 3 December 2014 / Published: 16 December 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (436 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Under oxidative stress conditions, endogenous antioxidant defenses are unable to completely inactivate the free radicals generated by an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This state causes serious cell damage leading to a variety of human diseases. Natural antioxidants can protect cells
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Under oxidative stress conditions, endogenous antioxidant defenses are unable to completely inactivate the free radicals generated by an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This state causes serious cell damage leading to a variety of human diseases. Natural antioxidants can protect cells against oxidative stress. Hypaodaphnis zenkeri (H. zenkiri) is a plant consumed as a spice in the Cameroonian diet, and its bark has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aims at investigating the antioxidant activity, which includes free radical scavenging and protective properties of an extract from H. Zenkiri against oxidative damage on a liver homogenate. The free radical assays determined the scavenging activities of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl (OH), nitrite oxide (NO) and 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radicals and the enzymes, whose protection was to be considered in the liver homogenate, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase. The antioxidative activities were studied using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), reductive activity, and phosphomolybdenum antioxidant power (PAP) methods. In addition, the phenolic contents of the extracts were examined. The results showed that these extracts demonstrated significant scavenging properties and antioxidant activities, with the hydro-ethanolic extract of the bark of H. zenkeri (EEH) being the most potent. This extract had the highest total polyphenol (21.77 ± 0.05 mg caffeic acid (CAE)/g dried extract (DE)) and flavonoids (3.34 ± 0.13 mg quercetin (QE)/g dried extract) content. The same extract had significantly greater protective effects on enzyme activities compared to other extracts. The high performance liquied chromatography (HPLC) profile showed higher levels of caffeic acid, OH-tyrosol acid, and rutin in the leaves compared to the bark of H. zenkeri. In conclusion, the ethanolic and hydro-ethanolic extracts of the bark and leaves from H. zenkeri showed an antioxidant and protective potential against oxidative damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Determination of Polyphenols)
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Open AccessArticle A Cystine-Rich Whey Supplement (Immunocal®) Delays Disease Onset and Prevents Spinal Cord Glutathione Depletion in the hSOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 843-865; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040843
Received: 29 October 2014 / Revised: 22 November 2014 / Accepted: 1 December 2014 / Published: 12 December 2014
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Abstract
Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal
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Depletion of the endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH), underlies progression of the devastating neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Thus, strategies aimed at elevating GSH may yield new therapeutics for ALS. Here, we investigated the effects of a unique non-denatured whey protein supplement, Immunocal®, in the transgenic Gly position 93 to Ala (G93A) mutant hSOD1 (hSOD1G93A) mouse model of ALS. Immunocal® is rich in the GSH precursor, cystine, and is therefore capable of bolstering GSH content. Transgenic hSOD1G93A mice receiving Immunocal® displayed a significant delay in disease onset compared to untreated hSOD1G93A controls. Additionally, Immunocal® treatment significantly decreased the rate of decline in grip strength and prevented disease-associated reductions in whole blood and spinal cord tissue GSH levels in end-stage hSOD1G93A mice. However, Immunocal® did not extend survival, likely due to its inability to preserve the mitochondrial GSH pool in spinal cord. Combination treatment with Immunocal® and the anti-glutamatergic compound, riluzole, delayed disease onset and extended survival in hSOD1G93A mice. These findings demonstrate that sustaining tissue GSH with Immunocal® only modestly delays disease onset and slows the loss of skeletal muscle strength in hSOD1G93A mice. Moreover, the inability of Immunocal® to rescue mitochondrial GSH in spinal cord provides a possible mechanism for its lack of effect on survival and is a limiting factor in the potential utility of this supplement as a therapeutic for ALS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle Rosmarinic Acid, a New Polyphenol from Baccaurea ramiflora Lour. Leaf: A Probable Compound for Its Anti-Inflammatory Activity
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 830-842; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040830
Received: 11 August 2014 / Revised: 20 November 2014 / Accepted: 20 November 2014 / Published: 3 December 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (600 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Despite several pharmacological applications of Baccaurea ramiflora Lour., studies on the influence of its polyphenol content on pharmacological activity such as anti-inflammatory properties have been scarce. Here we evaluated in vitro antioxidant activity, poyphenolics by HPLC and the anti-inflammatory potential of the methanolic
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Despite several pharmacological applications of Baccaurea ramiflora Lour., studies on the influence of its polyphenol content on pharmacological activity such as anti-inflammatory properties have been scarce. Here we evaluated in vitro antioxidant activity, poyphenolics by HPLC and the anti-inflammatory potential of the methanolic leaf extract of Baccaurea ramiflora (BME) and its protective effects in carrageenan-induced paw edema model of inflammation in rats. The BME extract contained 79.06 ± 0.03 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g total polyphenols, 28.80 ± 0.01 mg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g flavonoid and 29.42 ± 0.01 μg cathechin equivalent/g proanthocyanidin respectively and rosmarinic acid (8 mg/kg) as a main component was identified by HPLC. Results demonstrate that administration of BME at the dose of 200 mg/kg can reduce paw edema by over 63%, and it exhibits a dose-response effect. Depending on concentration, the extract exerted scavenging activity on DPPH radical (IC50 36.4 μg/mL), significantly inhibited IL-1β (4.4 pg/mg protein) and TNF-α (0.21 ng/μg protein). Therefore, we conclude BME causes a substantial reduction of inflammation in in vivo models. We propose that rosmarinic acid and similar phenolic compounds may be useful in the therapy of inflammation-related injuries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Determination of Polyphenols)
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Open AccessArticle An Optimised Aqueous Extract of Phenolic Compounds from Bitter Melon with High Antioxidant Capacity
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 814-829; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040814
Received: 9 September 2014 / Revised: 13 November 2014 / Accepted: 14 November 2014 / Published: 2 December 2014
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Abstract
Bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) is a tropical fruit claimed to have medicinal properties associated with its content of phenolic compounds (TPC). The aim of the study was to compare water with several organic solvents (acetone, butanol, methanol and 80% ethanol) for
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Bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) is a tropical fruit claimed to have medicinal properties associated with its content of phenolic compounds (TPC). The aim of the study was to compare water with several organic solvents (acetone, butanol, methanol and 80% ethanol) for its efficiency at extracting the TPC from freeze-dried bitter melon powder. The TPC of the extracts was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and their antioxidant capacity (AC) was evaluated using three assays. Before optimisation, the TPC and AC of the aqueous extract were 63% and 20% lower, respectively, than for the best organic solvent, 80% ethanol. However, after optimising for temperature (80 °C), time (5 min), water-to-powder ratio (40:1 mL/g), particle size (1 mm) and the number of extractions of the same sample (1×), the TPC and the AC of the aqueous extract were equal or higher than for 80% ethanol. Furthermore, less solvent (40 mL water/g) and less time (5 min) were needed than was used for the 80% ethanol extract (100 mL/g for 1 h). Therefore, this study provides evidence to recommend the use of water as the solvent of choice for the extraction of the phenolic compounds and their associated antioxidant activities from bitter melon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Determination of Polyphenols)
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Potential of Plumieride against CCl4-Induced Peroxidative Damage in Rats
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 798-813; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040798
Received: 5 September 2014 / Accepted: 6 November 2014 / Published: 27 November 2014
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Abstract
In search of a new potent as an antioxidant from natural sources, plumieride—an iridoid isolated from the methanol extract of the bark of Plumeria bicolor (family Apocynaceae) was evaluated for its antioxidant potential against CCl4-induced peroxidative damage in liver of rats.
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In search of a new potent as an antioxidant from natural sources, plumieride—an iridoid isolated from the methanol extract of the bark of Plumeria bicolor (family Apocynaceae) was evaluated for its antioxidant potential against CCl4-induced peroxidative damage in liver of rats. The antioxidant potential was evaluated by using hepatic tissue for SOD (superoxide dismutase), CAT (catalase), GSH (reduced glutathione), GPx (glutathione peroxidase), GR (glutathione reductase) and LPO (lipid peroxidation) alongwith the concomitant blood serum for AST & ALT (aspartate and alanine transaminases), GGT (gamma glutamyl transpeptidase), ALP (alkaline phosphatase), total bilirubin and total protein contents. All the biochemical parameters were significantly (p ≤ 0.001) altered by CCl4 (0.3 mL/kg body weight/twice a week, intra-peritoneally for 30 days). Simultaneously, oral treatment with plumieride (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg body weight/day for 30 days), restored all the parameters towards a normal level, remarkably. The histological findings of liver sections further corroborated the antioxidant potential of plumieride compared with standard drug-silymarin. In conclusion, plumieride consists of sugar molecules, which have alcoholic groups. Therefore, the alcoholic groups of sugar increase its antioxidant potential through intermolecular hydrogen bonding along with the thiol(SH) group of non-protein thiols and enzymes resulting in the restoration of the antioxidant system. Therefore, it might be considered a natural antioxidant against peroxidative damage in rats. Full article
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Open AccessReview Role of Oxidative Stress in HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder and Protection by Gene Delivery of Antioxidant Enzymes
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 770-797; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040770
Received: 13 October 2014 / Revised: 26 October 2014 / Accepted: 28 October 2014 / Published: 18 November 2014
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Abstract
HIV encephalopathy covers a range of HIV-1-related brain dysfunction. In the Central Nervous System (CNS), it is largely impervious to Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy (HAART). As survival with chronic HIV-1 infection improves, the number of people harboring the virus in their CNS increases.
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HIV encephalopathy covers a range of HIV-1-related brain dysfunction. In the Central Nervous System (CNS), it is largely impervious to Highly Active AntiRetroviral Therapy (HAART). As survival with chronic HIV-1 infection improves, the number of people harboring the virus in their CNS increases. Neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory changes may continue despite the use of HAART. Neurons themselves are rarely infected by HIV-1, but HIV-1 infects resident microglia, periventricular macrophages, leading to increased production of cytokines and to release of HIV-1 proteins, the most likely neurotoxins, among which are the envelope glycoprotein gp120 and HIV-1 trans-acting protein Tat. Gp120 and Tat induce oxidative stress in the brain, leading to neuronal apoptosis/death. We review here the role of oxidative stress in animal models of HIV-1 Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND) and in patients with HAND. Different therapeutic approaches, including clinical trials, have been used to mitigate oxidative stress in HAND. We used SV40 vectors for gene delivery of antioxidant enzymes, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), or glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) into the rat caudate putamen (CP). Intracerebral injection of SV (SOD1) or SV (GPx1) protects neurons from apoptosis caused by subsequent inoculation of gp120 and Tat at the same location. Vector administration into the lateral ventricle or cisterna magna protects from intra-CP gp120-induced neurotoxicity comparably to intra-CP vector administration. These models should provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV-1 in the brain as well as offer new therapeutic avenues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases)
Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Content, Antioxidant Activity, and Antibacterial Activity of Five Plants from the Commelinaceae Family
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 758-769; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040758
Received: 11 September 2014 / Revised: 27 October 2014 / Accepted: 3 November 2014 / Published: 17 November 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (428 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Commelinaceae is a family of herbaceous flowering plants with many species used in ethnobotany, particularly in South America. However, thus far reports of their bioactivity are few and far between. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the antioxidant and antibacterial
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Commelinaceae is a family of herbaceous flowering plants with many species used in ethnobotany, particularly in South America. However, thus far reports of their bioactivity are few and far between. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the antioxidant and antibacterial activity of five Commelinaceae methanolic leaf extracts. The antioxidant content was evaluated by the total phenolic content (TPC), total tannin content (TTC), and total flavonoid content (TFC) assays. The antioxidant activities measured were DPPH free radical scavenging (FRS), ferric reducing power (FRP), and ferrous ion chelating (FIC); of the five plants, the methanolic leaf extract of Tradescantia zebrina showed the highest antioxidant content and activity, and exhibited antibacterial activity against six species of Gram-positive and two species of Gram-negative bacteria in a range of 5–10 mg/mL based on the broth microdilution method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products as Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity, Total Flavonoids, Tannins and Phenolic Compounds in Psychotria Leaf Extracts
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 745-757; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040745
Received: 16 May 2014 / Revised: 23 July 2014 / Accepted: 8 September 2014 / Published: 10 November 2014
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (611 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The antioxidant activity of Psychotria carthagenensis, P. leiocarpa, P. capillacea and P. deflexa (Rubiaceae) extracts were investigated, and the concentrations of total phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins and flavonols were determined. The chemical compositions of the extracts were investigated using the high
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The antioxidant activity of Psychotria carthagenensis, P. leiocarpa, P. capillacea and P. deflexa (Rubiaceae) extracts were investigated, and the concentrations of total phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins and flavonols were determined. The chemical compositions of the extracts were investigated using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/PAD) method. We used 1,1-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH), β-Carotene bleaching and 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cations to determine antioxidant activity. The ability to scavenge radical was measured in these experiments by the discoloration of the solution. Concentrations of constituents were measured spectrophotometrically. P. carthagenensis and P. capillacea exhibited the highest antioxidant activity, in the DPPH test, β-carotene bleaching and ABTS system. The highest phenolic, flavonoid, condensed tannin and flavonol concentration was found in P. carthagenensis and P. capillacea extracts. HPLC-PDA analysis of P. carthagenensis and P. capillacea revealed hydroxycinnamic acid (p-coumaric acid). This is the first report on the antioxidant properties and constituent analysis of these Psychotria extracts. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of an Extract Rich in Polysaccharides of the Mushroom Polyporus dermoporus
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 730-744; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040730
Received: 12 August 2014 / Revised: 20 October 2014 / Accepted: 20 October 2014 / Published: 4 November 2014
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (872 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polyporus dermoporus mushroom, native to Brazil, is produced under natural conditions in the unexplored reserve of Mata da Estrela-Rio Grande do Norte-RN. These mushrooms were delipidated with chloroform:methanol (2:1 v/v), extracted with water at 100 °C, and fractionated with ethanol (one and three
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Polyporus dermoporus mushroom, native to Brazil, is produced under natural conditions in the unexplored reserve of Mata da Estrela-Rio Grande do Norte-RN. These mushrooms were delipidated with chloroform:methanol (2:1 v/v), extracted with water at 100 °C, and fractionated with ethanol (one and three volumes) and then centrifuged. The ethanol precipitation showed a high total sugar level of 64.8% and 1% of protein. This precipitate contained a high glucan level, characterized by chemical methods and by NMR of 13C and 1H and spectroscopy. The 13C NMR spectrum of these mushroom extracts showed the presence of β-glucose by a signal at 103.25 ppm. Studies with these glucans were made to elucidate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This extract of glucans inhibited the lipid peroxidation (42.9%) and superoxide radicals (83.3%) at 67 μg/mL. However, the inhibition of hydroxyl radical by the extract of this mushroom was 96% at 267 μg/mL. The action of this extract on induced pleurisy showed a 92.5% and 68.7% reduction in polymorphonuclears cells and nitric oxide, respectively, at 30 mg/kg. The glucans reduced the croton oil-induced ear edema by 65.6% at 30 mg/kg. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Capacity, Cytotoxicity and Antimycobacterial Activity of Madeira Archipelago Endemic Helichrysum Dietary and Medicinal Plants
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 713-729; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040713
Received: 19 August 2014 / Revised: 16 October 2014 / Accepted: 17 October 2014 / Published: 31 October 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The potential bioactivity of dietary and medicinal endemic Helichrysum plants from Madeira Archipelago was explored, for the first time, in order to supply new information for the general consumer. In vitro antioxidant properties were investigated using DPPH, ABTS•+, FRAP and β-Carotene
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The potential bioactivity of dietary and medicinal endemic Helichrysum plants from Madeira Archipelago was explored, for the first time, in order to supply new information for the general consumer. In vitro antioxidant properties were investigated using DPPH, ABTS•+, FRAP and β-Carotene assays, and the total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) were also determined. Although the results generally showed a large variation among the three analyzed plants, the methanolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Exception is made for H. devium n-hexane extract that showed good radical scavenger capacity associated to compounds with good reducing properties. In the Artemia salina toxicity assay and antimycobaterial activity, H. devium was the most potent plant with the lowest LD50 at 216.7 ± 10.4 and MIC ≤ 50 μg·mL−1. Chemometric evaluation (Principal Component Analysis—PCA) showed close interdependence between the ABTS, TPC and TFC methods and allowed to group H. devium samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products as Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 700-712; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040700
Received: 5 August 2014 / Revised: 27 August 2014 / Accepted: 3 September 2014 / Published: 23 October 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (2379 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Olive leaves are an agricultural waste of the olive-oil industry representing up to 10% of the dry weight arriving at olive mills. Disposal of this waste adds additional expense to farmers. Olive leaves have been shown to have a high concentration of phenolic
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Olive leaves are an agricultural waste of the olive-oil industry representing up to 10% of the dry weight arriving at olive mills. Disposal of this waste adds additional expense to farmers. Olive leaves have been shown to have a high concentration of phenolic compounds. In an attempt to utilize this waste product for phenolic compounds, we optimized their extraction using water—a “green” extraction solvent that has not yet been investigated for this purpose. Experiments were carried out according to a Box Behnken design, and the best possible combination of temperature, extraction time and sample-to-solvent ratio for the extraction of phenolic compounds with a high antioxidant activity was obtained using RSM; the optimal conditions for the highest yield of phenolic compounds was 90 °C for 70 min at a sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:100 g/mL; however, at 1:60 g/mL, we retained 80% of the total phenolic compounds and maximized antioxidant capacity. Therefore the sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:60 was chosen as optimal and used for further validation. The validation test fell inside the confidence range indicated by the RSM output; hence, the statistical model was trusted. The proposed method is inexpensive, easily up-scaled to industry and shows potential as an additional source of income for olive growers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products as Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle Modelling Extraction of White Tea Polyphenols: The Influence of Temperature and Ethanol Concentration
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 684-699; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040684
Received: 2 July 2014 / Revised: 29 July 2014 / Accepted: 30 September 2014 / Published: 21 October 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (351 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The optimization of the extraction of natural antioxidants from white tea has fostered intensive research. This study has investigated the effects of ethanol-water mixtures, temperature and time on the extraction of polyphenols and antioxidant components from white tea. The response surface methodology was
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The optimization of the extraction of natural antioxidants from white tea has fostered intensive research. This study has investigated the effects of ethanol-water mixtures, temperature and time on the extraction of polyphenols and antioxidant components from white tea. The response surface methodology was applied to identify the best extraction conditions. The best conditions to maximize the extraction of total polyphenols were: ethanol, 50%, for 47.5 min. Although the yield of polyphenols was optimal at 65 °C, the maximum antioxidant capacity was achieved with an extraction temperature of 90 °C. This study has identified the optimal conditions for the extraction of tea liquor with the best antioxidant properties. Epigallocatechin gallate, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin and epicatechin were extracted from white tea at concentrations up to 29.6 ± 10.6, 5.40 ± 2.09, 5.04 ± 0.20 and 2.48 ± 1.10 mg/100 g. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products as Antioxidants)
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Open AccessArticle Analysis of Phenolic and Flavonoid Contents, and the Anti-Oxidative Potential and Lipid Peroxidation Inhibitory Activity of Methanolic Extract of Carissa opaca Roots and Its Fractions in Different Solvents
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 671-683; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040671
Received: 23 July 2014 / Revised: 19 September 2014 / Accepted: 30 September 2014 / Published: 20 October 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (473 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to investigate the anti-oxidative potential of methanolic extract of Carissa opaca roots and its fractions in solvents of different polarities. Total phenolic (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents of methanolic extract were 211.95 ± 0.78 μg/mL gallic
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The objective of the present work was to investigate the anti-oxidative potential of methanolic extract of Carissa opaca roots and its fractions in solvents of different polarities. Total phenolic (TPC) and flavonoid (TFC) contents of methanolic extract were 211.95 ± 0.78 μg/mL gallic acid equivalents (GAE) and 8.35 ± 0.21 μg/mL rutin equivalents (RE), respectively. Ethyl acetate contained the highest amounts of both (TFC, 11.8 ± 0.28 RE; TPC, 342.80 ± 0.42 GAE) followed by chloroform fraction (TFC, 7.50 ± 0.14 RE; TPC, 275.85 ± 0.50 GAE). Extract and fractions displayed remarkable DPPH radical scavenging activity. EC50 values of methanolic extract was 0.88 mg/mL, while that of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanolic and aqueous fractions were 0.58, 0.38, 0.29, 0.36 and 5.83 mg/mL, respectively, ethyl acetate fraction being most potent. The ethyl acetate fraction also showed the highest activity in terms of reducing power, phosphomolybdate and ABTS assays. All the fractions showed fairly good lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity, which remained almost constant over three days. Based on the results it can be concluded that roots of Carissa opaca contains phytochemicals with exploitable antioxidant, free radical scavenging, and lipid peroxidation inhibitory potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products as Antioxidants)
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Open AccessReview Flavonoids Affect Host-Microbiota Crosstalk through TLR Modulation
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 649-670; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040649
Received: 31 July 2014 / Revised: 7 August 2014 / Accepted: 26 September 2014 / Published: 17 October 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (967 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Interaction between host cells and microbes is known as crosstalk. Among other mechanisms, this takes place when certain molecules of the micro-organisms are recognized by the toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the body cells, mainly in the intestinal epithelial cells and in the immune
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Interaction between host cells and microbes is known as crosstalk. Among other mechanisms, this takes place when certain molecules of the micro-organisms are recognized by the toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the body cells, mainly in the intestinal epithelial cells and in the immune cells. TLRs belong to the pattern-recognition receptors and represent the first line of defense against pathogens, playing a pivotal role in both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation in the activity of such receptors can lead to the development of chronic and severe inflammation as well as immunological disorders. Among components present in the diet, flavonoids have been suggested as antioxidant dietary factors able to modulate TLR-mediated signaling pathways. This review focuses on the molecular targets involved in the modulatory action of flavonoids on TLR-mediated signaling pathways, providing an overview of the mechanisms involved in such action. Particular flavonoids have been able to modify the composition of the microbiota, to modulate TLR gene and protein expression, and to regulate the downstream signaling molecules involved in the TLR pathway. These synergistic mechanisms suggest the role of some flavonoids in the preventive effect on certain chronic diseases. Full article
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Open AccessReview Assessing Antioxidant Capacity in Brain Tissue: Methodologies and Limitations in Neuroprotective Strategies
Antioxidants 2014, 3(4), 636-648; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox3040636
Received: 17 July 2014 / Revised: 24 July 2014 / Accepted: 2 September 2014 / Published: 13 October 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (422 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The number of putative neuroprotective compounds with antioxidant activity described in the literature continues to grow. Although these compounds are validated using a variety of in vivo and in vitro techniques, they are often evaluated initially using in vitro cell culture techniques in
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The number of putative neuroprotective compounds with antioxidant activity described in the literature continues to grow. Although these compounds are validated using a variety of in vivo and in vitro techniques, they are often evaluated initially using in vitro cell culture techniques in order to establish toxicity and effective concentrations. Both in vivo and in vitro methodologies have their respective advantages and disadvantages, including, but not limited to, cost, time, use of resources and technical limitations. This review expands on the inherent benefits and drawbacks of in vitro and in vivo methods for assessing neuroprotection, especially in light of proper evaluation of compound efficacy and neural bioavailability. For example, in vivo studies can better evaluate the effects of protective compounds and/or its metabolites on various tissues, including the brain, in the whole animal, whereas in vitro studies can better discern the cellular and/or mechanistic effects of compounds. In particular, we aim to address the question of appropriate and accurate extrapolation of findings from in vitro experiment-where compounds are often directly applied to cellular extracts, potentially at higher concentrations than would ever cross the blood-brain barrier—to the more complex scenario of neuroprotection due to pharmacodynamics in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Diseases)
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