Next Issue
Previous Issue

E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Table of Contents

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, Volume 6, Issue 11 (November 2009), Pages 2725-2918

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-17
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

Open AccessEditorial Indoor Air Pollution: An Old Problem with New Challenges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2880-2882; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112880
Received: 21 October 2009 / Accepted: 17 November 2009 / Published: 19 November 2009
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (109 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hazards in our indoor environments have been recognized since biblical times. The advice in Leviticus 14:33–48 for treating mold infested houses has contemporary meaning in the recent World Health Organization (WHO) document on damp and moldy indoor spaces [1]. In the developed [...] Read more.
Hazards in our indoor environments have been recognized since biblical times. The advice in Leviticus 14:33–48 for treating mold infested houses has contemporary meaning in the recent World Health Organization (WHO) document on damp and moldy indoor spaces [1]. In the developed world, faulty combustion, carbon monoxide from coal gas, lead paint, poor ventilation of tenement housing and hospitals have been recognized for decades as unhealthy. Indoor air quality, however, was not appreciated as an important component of public health until the proliferation of sealed buildings, energy conservation programs (urea formaldehyde foam insulation), new products, and the recognition of the health effects of radon, asbestos and latex. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Pollution and Human Health)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

Open AccessArticle A History of Alcohol Dependence Increases the Incidence and Severity of Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in Cardiac Surgical Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2725-2739; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112725
Received: 27 August 2009 / Accepted: 17 October 2009 / Published: 27 October 2009
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (245 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) commonly occurs after cardiac surgery. We tested the hypothesis that a history of alcohol dependence is associated with an increased incidence and severity of POCD in male patients undergoing cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. Recent verbal and nonverbal [...] Read more.
Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) commonly occurs after cardiac surgery. We tested the hypothesis that a history of alcohol dependence is associated with an increased incidence and severity of POCD in male patients undergoing cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. Recent verbal and nonverbal memory and executive functions were assessed before and one week after surgery in patients with or without a history of alcohol dependence. Cognitive function was significantly reduced after cardiac surgery in patients with versus without a history of alcohol dependence. The results suggest that a history of alcohol dependence increases the incidence and severity of POCD after cardiac surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Public Health)
Open AccessArticle Chronic Traffic-Induced PM Exposure and Self-Reported Respiratory and Cardiovascular Health in the RHINE Tartu Cohort
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2740-2751; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112740
Received: 24 August 2009 / Accepted: 29 October 2009 / Published: 30 October 2009
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (262 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The relationship between exposure to traffic induced particles, respiratory health and cardiac diseases was studied in the RHINE Tartu cohort. A postal questionnaire with commonly used questions regarding respiratory symptoms, cardiac disease, lifestyle issues such as smoking habits, indoor environment, occupation, early [...] Read more.
The relationship between exposure to traffic induced particles, respiratory health and cardiac diseases was studied in the RHINE Tartu cohort. A postal questionnaire with commonly used questions regarding respiratory symptoms, cardiac disease, lifestyle issues such as smoking habits, indoor environment, occupation, early life exposure and sleep disorders was sent to 2,460 adults. The annual concentrations of local traffic induced particles were modelled with an atmospheric dispersion model with traffic flow data, and obtained PMexhaust concentrations in 40 × 40 m grids were linked with home addresses with GIS. The relationship between the level of exhaust particles outside home and self-reported health problems were analyzed using a multiple logistic regression model. We found a significant relation between fine exhaust particles and cardiac disease, OR = 1.64 (95% CI 1.12–2.43) for increase in PMexhaust corresponding to the fifth to the 95th percentile range. The associations also were positive but non-significant for hypertension OR = 1.42 (95% CI 0.94–2.13), shortness of breath OR = 1.27 (95% CI 0.84–1.94) and other respiratory symptoms. Full article
Open AccessArticle State Adoption of 100% Smoke-Free Acute Non Federal Hospital Campus Policies
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2793-2799; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112793
Received: 21 September 2009 / Accepted: 6 November 2009 / Published: 10 November 2009
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (40 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To assess the number and percentage of acute care hospitals in the U.S. that have adopted smoke-free hospital campus (SFHC) policies, researchers conducted an assessment from January 2008 to May 2008 of available data on SFHC policy adoption in each state. Slightly [...] Read more.
To assess the number and percentage of acute care hospitals in the U.S. that have adopted smoke-free hospital campus (SFHC) policies, researchers conducted an assessment from January 2008 to May 2008 of available data on SFHC policy adoption in each state. Slightly more than one third (34.4%) of acute care, non-Federal hospitals had adopted such policies, with wide variation of policy adoption between states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smoking and Tobacco Control)
Open AccessArticle Agreement between the SCORE and D’Agostino Scales for the Classification of High Cardiovascular Risk in Sedentary Spanish Patients
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2800-2811; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112800
Received: 12 August 2009 / Accepted: 6 November 2009 / Published: 11 November 2009
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (465 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: To evaluate agreement between cardiovascular risk in sedentary patients as estimated by the new Framingham-D’Agostino scale and by the SCORE chart, and to describe the patient characteristics associated with the observed disagreement between the scales. Design: A cross-sectional study was undertaken [...] Read more.
Background: To evaluate agreement between cardiovascular risk in sedentary patients as estimated by the new Framingham-D’Agostino scale and by the SCORE chart, and to describe the patient characteristics associated with the observed disagreement between the scales. Design: A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving a systematic sample of 2,295 sedentary individuals between 40–65 years of age seen for any reason in 56 primary care offices. An estimation was made of the Pearson correlation coefficient and kappa statistic for the classification of high risk subjects (≥20% according to the Framingham-D’Agostino scale, and ≥5% according to SCORE). Polytomous logistic regression models were fitted to identify the variables associated with the discordance between the two scales. Results: The mean risk in males (35%) was 19.5% ± 13% with D’Agostino scale, and 3.2% ± 3.3% with SCORE. Among females, they were 8.1% ± 6.8% and 1.2% ± 2.2%, respectively. The correlation between the two scales was 0.874 in males (95% CI: 0.857–0.889) and 0.818 in females (95% CI: 0.800–0.834), while the kappa index was 0.50 in males (95% CI: 0.44%–0.56%) and 0.61 in females (95% CI: 0.52%–0.71%). The most frequent disagreement, characterized by high risk according to D’Agostino scale but not according to SCORE, was much more prevalent among males and proved more probable with increasing age and increased LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and systolic blood pressure values, as well as among those who used antihypertensive drugs and smokers. Conclusions: The quantitative correlation between the two scales is very high. Patient categorization as corresponding to high risk generates disagreements, mainly among males, where agreement between the two classifications is only moderate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cardiovascular Diseases and Public Health)
Open AccessArticle Incidence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence on Nursing Staffs Caring for Chronic Psychiatric Patients in Taiwan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2812-2821; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112812
Received: 17 September 2009 / Accepted: 10 November 2009 / Published: 12 November 2009
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (188 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The [...] Read more.
This one-year follow-up study determined the incidence and risk factors of workplace violence against nursing staff in a psychiatric hospital. The cohort members had a website to report events whenever they came across violence. A total of 971 events were reported. The incidence rates of physical violence, verbal abuse, bullying/mobbing, sexual harassment, and racial harassment were 1.7, 3.7, 0.2, 0.3, and 0 per staff-year, respectively. Young age, female sex, lower education, shorter duration of employment, and high level of anxiety of staff seemed to be the determinants of violence. Pre-placement education should focus on these staff to reduce workplace violence. Full article
Open AccessArticle Impact of Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders on Retention in a Methadone Maintenance Program: An 18-Month Follow-Up Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2822-2832; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112822
Received: 15 October 2009 / Accepted: 10 November 2009 / Published: 12 November 2009
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (243 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We assess the influence of co-occurring psychiatric disorders on retention in 189 opioid dependent patients in a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and determine the incidence of psychiatric co-morbidity during an 18-month follow-up period. About 68.5 % were retained in the MMT. Neither [...] Read more.
We assess the influence of co-occurring psychiatric disorders on retention in 189 opioid dependent patients in a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and determine the incidence of psychiatric co-morbidity during an 18-month follow-up period. About 68.5 % were retained in the MMT. Neither co-occurring mental disorders (chi-square = 0.303, df = 1, p = 0.622) nor methadone doses [85 (88.9) vs. 79.2 (85) mg/day, p = 0.672] were related to retention. In the follow-up period 19 new diagnoses were made, mainly major depression and antisocial and borderline personality disorders. Co-occurring psychiatric disorders should be assessed during MMT follow-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Abuse and Addiction)
Open AccessArticle Application of the WHO Keys of Safer Food to Improve Food Handling Practices of Food Vendors in a Poor Resource Community in Ghana
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2833-2842; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112833
Received: 9 October 2009 / Accepted: 2 November 2009 / Published: 13 November 2009
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (177 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Data was collected from food vendors in a poor resource community in Ghana, which showed that the vendors constituted an important source of oro-faecal transmission. Following this, the WHO five keys of safer food were utilized in an evidence based training programme [...] Read more.
Data was collected from food vendors in a poor resource community in Ghana, which showed that the vendors constituted an important source of oro-faecal transmission. Following this, the WHO five keys of safer food were utilized in an evidence based training programme for the vendors to improve their food handling practices. Impact assessment of the food safety training showed that 67.6% of the vendors had acquired some knowledge from the workshop and were putting it into practice. Lack of food safety equipment was a major hinderance to behavioral change among the vendors as far food handling practices are concerned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Behavior and Public Health)
Open AccessArticle Public Health and Nursing: A Natural Partnership
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2843-2848; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112843
Received: 15 October 2009 / Accepted: 6 November 2009 / Published: 16 November 2009
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The health of individuals occurs within the context of their environment and the other individuals they interact with in the communities they live in, work in and visit. Promoting the health of the public requires multiple strategies aimed at improving the environment, [...] Read more.
The health of individuals occurs within the context of their environment and the other individuals they interact with in the communities they live in, work in and visit. Promoting the health of the public requires multiple strategies aimed at improving the environment, the health knowledge of groups and individuals, maintaining adequate food and water, and reducing the spread of disease. Many disciplines are needed to meet these goals, but the largest segment of the professional health work force required to meet these needs is nursing. Historically, nursing leaders in public health such as Florence Nightingale and Lillian Wald made significant inroads related to serious health issues because they were nurses. Today across the globe, nurses provide the key components of public health interventions including well baby care, health education, screening and immunization clinics, disaster management and emergency preparedness. With the growing nursing shortage in acute care settings, the brain drain of nurses from certain areas of the world, the shrinking public dollars for preventive health care, the nursing workforce needed to continue to provide these essential health care services is threatened. It is essential to put the spot light on nursing’s role in public health with the hopes of attracting more public funds and more nurses to provide these essential services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Public Health)
Open AccessArticle Variation of Natural Streamflow since 1470 in the Middle Yellow River, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2849-2864; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112849
Received: 24 September 2009 / Accepted: 17 November 2009 / Published: 17 November 2009
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (613 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays, as the available water resources throughout the World are becoming depleted, in order to manage and plan water resource better, more and more attention is being paid into the fluctuating characteristics of water discharges. However, the preexisting research was mainly focused [...] Read more.
Nowadays, as the available water resources throughout the World are becoming depleted, in order to manage and plan water resource better, more and more attention is being paid into the fluctuating characteristics of water discharges. However, the preexisting research was mainly focused on the last half century. In this paper, the natural streamflow observed since 1470 at the Sanmenxia station in the middle Yellow River basin was collected, and the methods of variation coefficient, moving average, Mann-Kendall test and wavelet transform were applied to analyze the dynamic characteristics of the streamflow. The results showed that, (1) between 1470 and 2007, the natural streamflow changed 200–919 ×108 m3, and water discharge varied moderately; (2) in the middle Yellow River basin, it appears that the most severe and most persistent droughts during circa 1868–1990, the periods of 1470s–1490s, 1920s–1930s and 1990s–2000s also presented the condition of sustained low flows; (3) the natural streamflow series shows increasing and decreasing trends during the periods of 1470–1880 and 1881–2007, respectively, but both trends are not significant at >95% confidence; in addition, it is still found the streamflow series shows abrupt changes circa 1845, 1935 and 1960, respectively; (4) within a 250-year scale, there are circa 11, 26, 67 and 120-year periods for natural streamflow at the Sanmenxia station, and the periodicity of the 120-year one is the strongest. The dynamic characteristics of natural streamflow is the comprehensive result by many influencing factors, such as precipitation, temperature, El Niño-Southern Oscillation, sunspots, human activity etc. Full article
Open AccessArticle Leachability of Arsenic and Heavy Metals from Mine Tailings of Abandoned Metal Mines
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2865-2879; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112865
Received: 31 August 2009 / Accepted: 14 November 2009 / Published: 17 November 2009
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (486 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mine tailings from an abandoned metal mine in Korea contained high concentrations of arsenic (As) and heavy metals [e.g., As: 67,336, Fe: 137,180, Cu: 764, Pb: 3,572, and Zn: 12,420 (mg/kg)]. US EPA method 6010 was an effective method for analyzing total [...] Read more.
Mine tailings from an abandoned metal mine in Korea contained high concentrations of arsenic (As) and heavy metals [e.g., As: 67,336, Fe: 137,180, Cu: 764, Pb: 3,572, and Zn: 12,420 (mg/kg)]. US EPA method 6010 was an effective method for analyzing total arsenic and heavy metals concentrations. Arsenic in the mine tailings showed a high residual fraction of 89% by a sequential extraction. In Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Korean Standard Leaching Test (KSLT), leaching concentrations of arsenic and heavy metals were very low [e.g., As (mg/L): 0.4 for TCLP and 0.2 for KSLT; cf. As criteria (mg/L): 5.0 for TCLP and 1.5 for KSLT]. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Two Distinct Training Methods for a Doctrine of Life with Healthy Heart in a Low Socioeconomic Society Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2883-2897; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112883
Received: 3 September 2009 / Accepted: 17 November 2009 / Published: 19 November 2009
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study was conducted in three stages in a semi-rural region of Eskisehir, Turkey. In the first stage, individuals selected by random sampling were evaluated for cardiovascular disease risk factors. In the second stage, Group I and Group II training materials were [...] Read more.
This study was conducted in three stages in a semi-rural region of Eskisehir, Turkey. In the first stage, individuals selected by random sampling were evaluated for cardiovascular disease risk factors. In the second stage, Group I and Group II training materials were randomly distributed. In the third stage, the subjects were screened one year later to assess and determine if there had been any changes in their attitudes towards the dangers of cardiovascular diseases. The number of active smokers significantly decreased after the training in the both groups. The percentage of people with regulated blood pressure exhibited an increase in Group II more than Group I. Full article
Open AccessArticle Examining Factors in the Research Institute on Addictions Self-Inventory (RIASI): Associations with Alcohol Use and Problems at Assessment and Follow-Up
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2898-2918; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112898
Received: 7 October 2009 / Accepted: 18 November 2009 / Published: 24 November 2009
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (269 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Impaired driving is a leading cause of alcohol-related deaths and injuries. Rehabilitation or remedial programs, involving assessment and screening of convicted impaired drivers to determine problem severity and appropriate programs, are an important component of society’s response to this problem. Ontario’s remedial [...] Read more.
Impaired driving is a leading cause of alcohol-related deaths and injuries. Rehabilitation or remedial programs, involving assessment and screening of convicted impaired drivers to determine problem severity and appropriate programs, are an important component of society’s response to this problem. Ontario’s remedial program, Back on Track (BOT), involves an assessment process that includes administration of the Research Institute on Addictions Self-Inventory (RIASI) to determine assignment to an education or treatment program. The purpose of this study is to identify factors within the RIASI and examine how factor scores are associated with alcohol use and problem indicators at assessment and six-month follow-up. The sample included 22,298 individuals who completed BOT from 2000 to 2005. Principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on RIASI data and an eight factor solution was retained: (1) Negative Affect, (2) Sensation Seeking, (3) Alcohol-Quantity, (4) Social Conformity, (5) High Risk Lifestyle, (6) Alcohol Problems, (7) Interpersonal Competence, and (8) Family History. Regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between factors and alcohol and problem measures obtained at assessment and at follow-up. Most factors, except for Interpersonal Competence, were associated with more alcohol use and problems at assessment. A similar pattern was observed at 6-month follow-up, but interestingly some factors (Negative Affect, Sensation Seeking, Alcohol-Quantity and Family History) predicted fewer days of alcohol use. The Interpersonal Competence factor was associated with significantly lower levels of alcohol use and problems at both assessment and follow-up. This work suggests that the RIASI provides information on several domains that have important relationships with alcohol problem severity and outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Public Health)

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Other

Open AccessReview Is There a Link between Wheezing in Early Childhood and Adverse Birth Outcomes? A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2752-2761; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112752
Received: 24 August 2009 / Accepted: 29 October 2009 / Published: 3 November 2009
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (208 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We aimed to provide a summary of the existing published knowledge on the association between adverse birth outcomes and the development of wheezing during the first two years of life. We carried out a systematic review of epidemiological studies within the MEDLINE [...] Read more.
We aimed to provide a summary of the existing published knowledge on the association between adverse birth outcomes and the development of wheezing during the first two years of life. We carried out a systematic review of epidemiological studies within the MEDLINE database. Epidemiological studies on human subjects, published in English, were included in the review. A comprehensive literature search yielded 72 studies for further consideration. Following the application of the eligibility criteria we identified nine studies. A positive association and an excess risk of wheezing during the first two years of life were revealed for adverse birth outcomes. Full article
Open AccessReview Alcoholic Pancreatitis: Pathogenesis, Incidence and Treatment with Special Reference to the Associated Pain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2763-2782; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112763
Received: 17 September 2009 / Accepted: 2 November 2009 / Published: 4 November 2009
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (328 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Alcoholic pancreatitis continues to stir up controversy. One of the most debated points is whether from onset it is a chronic disease or whether it progresses to a chronic form after repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. Histological studies on patients with alcoholic [...] Read more.
Alcoholic pancreatitis continues to stir up controversy. One of the most debated points is whether from onset it is a chronic disease or whether it progresses to a chronic form after repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. Histological studies on patients with alcoholic pancreatitis have shown that the disease is chronic from onset and that alcoholic acute pancreatitis occurs in a pancreas already damaged by chronic lesions. Genetic factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic disease. The incidence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis seems to have decreased in the last twenty years. Finally, recent therapeutic studies which have shown medical or surgical approaches capable of reducing the pain episodes in chronic pancreatitis patients will be described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Public Health)
Open AccessReview Alcohol-Induced Blackout
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2783-2792; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112783
Received: 10 October 2009 / Accepted: 5 November 2009 / Published: 6 November 2009
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (108 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
For a long time, alcohol was thought to exert a general depressant effect on the central nervous system (CNS). However, currently the consensus is that specific regions of the brain are selectively vulnerable to the acute effects of alcohol. An alcohol-induced blackout [...] Read more.
For a long time, alcohol was thought to exert a general depressant effect on the central nervous system (CNS). However, currently the consensus is that specific regions of the brain are selectively vulnerable to the acute effects of alcohol. An alcohol-induced blackout is the classic example; the subject is temporarily unable to form new long-term memories while relatively maintaining other skills such as talking or even driving. A recent study showed that alcohol can cause retrograde memory impairment, that is, blackouts due to retrieval impairments as well as those due to deficits in encoding. Alcoholic blackouts may be complete (en bloc) or partial (fragmentary) depending on severity of memory impairment. In fragmentary blackouts, cueing often aids recall. Memory impairment during acute intoxication involves dysfunction of episodic memory, a type of memory encoded with spatial and social context. Recent studies have shown that there are multiple memory systems supported by discrete brain regions, and the acute effects of alcohol on learning and memory may result from alteration of the hippocampus and related structures on a cellular level. A rapid increase in blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is most consistently associated with the likelihood of a blackout. However, not all subjects experience blackouts, implying that genetic factors play a role in determining CNS vulnerability to the effects of alcohol. This factor may predispose an individual to alcoholism, as altered memory function during intoxication may affect an individual‟s alcohol expectancy; one may perceive positive aspects of intoxication while unintentionally ignoring the negative aspects. Extensive research on memory and learning as well as findings related to the acute effects of alcohol on the brain may elucidate the mechanisms and impact associated with the alcohol- induced blackout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcohol and Public Health)

Other

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Review

Open AccessCorrection Editor’s Note – Received Date Error, Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6, 2387-2396
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2762; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112762
Published: 3 November 2009
PDF Full-text (51 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract Editor’s Note added on 3 November 2009: The received date was wrong in Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6, 2387-2396. [...] Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
IJERPH Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
ijerph@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to IJERPH
Back to Top