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Special Issue "Nursing and Public Health"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 October 2009)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Christine L. Savage, RN, Ph.D, CARN

Director, Public Health Nursing component of the Masters Program; Associate Professor, College of Nursing; Associate Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center; PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0038, USA
Phone: +1 513 558 5241
Fax: +1 513 558 2142

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of this Special Issue is to highlight the role of nursing in the promotion and protection of the public’s health. The global public health infrastructure faces multiple challenges due to increased interdependence between countries both economically, social and in relation to health. Nurses have a huge potential to meet these challenges not only because they comprise the largest sector of the health professions, but also due to their rich history in public health. This special issue will present a blend of articles that include research articles that demonstrate the effectiveness of public health nursing interventions, articles with a focus on public health nursing and global health, health policy articles related to the role of nursing in public health and at least one historical article on past contributions of public health nursing. Example of specific topics include the historical contribution of nursing to the reduction in infectious disease mortality (e.g. the work of Lillian Wald), the development of board certified advanced public health nursing practice, as well as specific examples of the impact public health nursing interventions have on improvement of population health.

Christine L. Savage, Ph.D, RN, CARN
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • Nursing
  • Population health
  • Community Health
  • Health determinants
  • Public health nursing
  • Nursing history
  • Global health

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Public Health and Nursing: A Natural Partnership
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(11), 2843-2848; doi:10.3390/ijerph6112843
Received: 15 October 2009 / Accepted: 6 November 2009 / Published: 16 November 2009
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The health of individuals occurs within the context of their environment and the other individuals they interact with in the communities they live in, work in and visit. Promoting the health of the public requires multiple strategies aimed at improving the environment, [...] Read more.
The health of individuals occurs within the context of their environment and the other individuals they interact with in the communities they live in, work in and visit. Promoting the health of the public requires multiple strategies aimed at improving the environment, the health knowledge of groups and individuals, maintaining adequate food and water, and reducing the spread of disease. Many disciplines are needed to meet these goals, but the largest segment of the professional health work force required to meet these needs is nursing. Historically, nursing leaders in public health such as Florence Nightingale and Lillian Wald made significant inroads related to serious health issues because they were nurses. Today across the globe, nurses provide the key components of public health interventions including well baby care, health education, screening and immunization clinics, disaster management and emergency preparedness. With the growing nursing shortage in acute care settings, the brain drain of nurses from certain areas of the world, the shrinking public dollars for preventive health care, the nursing workforce needed to continue to provide these essential health care services is threatened. It is essential to put the spot light on nursing’s role in public health with the hopes of attracting more public funds and more nurses to provide these essential services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Public Health)
Open AccessArticle Chronic Disease Management in Sub-Saharan Africa: Whose Business Is It?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(8), 2258-2270; doi:10.3390/ijerph6082258
Received: 16 July 2009 / Accepted: 10 August 2009 / Published: 14 August 2009
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (64 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Public health specialists and clinicians alike agree that Humanity faces a global pandemic of chronic diseases in the 21st century. In this article we discuss the implications of this pandemic on another global issue, the health workforce. Because both issues are [...] Read more.
Public health specialists and clinicians alike agree that Humanity faces a global pandemic of chronic diseases in the 21st century. In this article we discuss the implications of this pandemic on another global issue, the health workforce. Because both issues are particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), we will focus on this region and use Cameroon as a case in point. We first gauge the epidemic of chronic conditions in SSA. We then discuss the implications of chronic conditions for the reshaping of health systems and the health workforce. We conclude by making a strong case for the building up and strengthening the health workforce, insisting on the crucial role of nurses, their training, and involvement in chronic disease management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Public Health)

Review

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Open AccessReview Recent Developments in Public Health Nursing in the Americas
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(3), 729-750; doi:10.3390/ijerph7030729
Received: 18 December 2009 / Accepted: 22 January 2010 / Published: 26 February 2010
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (224 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study presents an assessment of the participation and training of nurses in public health areas in the Americas. Information was gathered through a literature review and interviews with key informants from Mexico, Colombia, and Paraguay. Results demonstrate that there is significant [...] Read more.
This study presents an assessment of the participation and training of nurses in public health areas in the Americas. Information was gathered through a literature review and interviews with key informants from Mexico, Colombia, and Paraguay. Results demonstrate that there is significant variation in definitions of public health nursing across the region and current systematized data about the workforce profile of public health nursing personnel is not available for many countries in the Americas. There are significant regional differences in the levels and types of training of nurses working in public health areas and an increasing number of nurses are pursuing training in public health at the master’s and doctoral levels. Many nurses carry out some or all of the essential functions of public health, but are not considered to be public health nurses. Generally, auxiliary and technical nurses have a broader presence in public health areas than professional nurses. In the future, regional health systems reforms should support increased recruitment and training of public health nurses, as well as stronger roles in public health research and health care at the individual, community, and population levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Public Health)
Open AccessReview Specialist Community Nurses: A Critical Analysis of Their Role in the Management of Long-Term Conditions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2009, 6(10), 2550-2567; doi:10.3390/ijerph6102550
Received: 3 September 2009 / Accepted: 25 September 2009 / Published: 29 September 2009
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (385 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The aim of this narrative review is to identify strategies in use by specialist community and public health nurses in the prevention, care and management of individuals with long-term conditions, specifically chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and musculoskeletal disorders. These conditions have [...] Read more.
The aim of this narrative review is to identify strategies in use by specialist community and public health nurses in the prevention, care and management of individuals with long-term conditions, specifically chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and musculoskeletal disorders. These conditions have been selected as they are highly prevalent; a burden on health services globally and a major public health issue. From a UK policy perspective, specialist community nurses have been placed at the forefront of taking a lead role in the coordination and delivery of more responsive services for individuals with long-term conditions; whether this has been an effective use of skills and resource is questionable. We systematically searched relevant databases between 1999–2009 to identify interventions used by specialist community nurses and critically appraised the studies. This review reports on impact and value of interventions used by specialist community nurses in the prevention and management of COPD and musculoskeletal conditions, and makes recommendations for improving services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nursing and Public Health)

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