Special Issue "Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Guido Cavaletti
Unità di Neurologia Sperimentale e Centro di Neuroscienze di Milano, Dipartimento di Chirurgia e Medicina traslazionale, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, 20900 Monza, Italy
Website: http://www.enu.dcmt.unimib.it/doctor/guido-cavaletti/
Interests: peripheral neuropathies; antineoplastic drugs; animal models; clinical trials
Guest Editor
Dr. Valentina Carozzi
Unità di Neurologia Sperimentale e Centro di Neuroscienze di Milano, Dipartimento di Chirurgia e Medicina traslazionale, Università di Milano-Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, 20900 Monza, Italy
Website: http://www.enu.dcmt.unimib.it/doctor/valentina-carozzi/
Interests: peripheral neuropathies, antineoplastic drugs, animal models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pharmacological treatment of human disorders has afforded a remarkable improvement in the management of severe illnesses, but the use of effective drugs can also be associated with “off-target” side effects which might have an impact on the survival and/or the patients’ quality of life.

Among the wide spectrum of toxicities, neurotoxicity represents one of the main concerns since the nervous system has limited capacity to recover from damage and supportive treatments are frequently ineffective.

The central nervous system is protected by the blood-brain barrier and most of the putative toxic agents are unable to cross the intact barrier, but this protection might be overcome by the administration of very high doses of drugs or might be less effective in the course of diseases such as brain tumours and infections. However, the peripheral nervous system is much less effectively protected and specific regions, such as the dorsal root ganglia, allow a very easy access to toxic substances reaching the nervous system through the bloodstream.

A full comprehension of the possible neurotoxicity of systemic as well as of local treatments represents a cornerstone in the knowledge of any physician, and it should not be limited to specialists in clinical neurosciences. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide the necessary background to enhance this comprehension, with a focus on the most frequent clinical syndromes in different fields of medicine.

Prof. Guido Cavaletti
Dr. Valentina Carozzi
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • nervous system
  • toxicity
  • clinical
  • animal models
  • diagnosis
  • treatment

Published Papers (5 papers)

Download All Papers
Sort by:
Display options:
Select articles Export citation of selected articles as:
Select/unselect all
Displaying article 1-5
p. 224-248
by , , , , ,  and
Toxics 2015, 3(2), 224-248; doi:10.3390/toxics3020224
Received: 30 April 2015 / Revised: 9 June 2015 / Accepted: 9 June 2015 / Published: 19 June 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (1246 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
p. 198-223
by ,  and
Toxics 2015, 3(2), 198-223; doi:10.3390/toxics3020198
Received: 24 April 2015 / Revised: 26 May 2015 / Accepted: 1 June 2015 / Published: 5 June 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (1559 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
p. 187-197
by
Toxics 2015, 3(2), 187-197; doi:10.3390/toxics3020187
Received: 3 May 2015 / Revised: 20 May 2015 / Accepted: 26 May 2015 / Published: 29 May 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (315 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
p. 152-169
by  and
Toxics 2015, 3(2), 152-169; doi:10.3390/toxics3020152
Received: 1 April 2015 / Revised: 19 April 2015 / Accepted: 21 April 2015 / Published: 28 April 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (205 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
p. 75-88
by  and
Toxics 2015, 3(1), 75-88; doi:10.3390/toxics3010075
Received: 22 January 2015 / Revised: 16 February 2015 / Accepted: 26 February 2015 / Published: 5 March 2015
Show/Hide Abstract | PDF Full-text (420 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Toxicities of Therapeutic Agents Used in Medicine)
Select/unselect all
Displaying article 1-5
Select articles Export citation of selected articles as:

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of paper: Review
Title: Current View in Platinum Drugs Mechanisms of Peripheral Neurotoxicity
Authors: Alessia Chiorazzi, Sara Semperboni and Paola Marmiroli
Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza (MB), Italy; E-Mail: alessia.chiorazzi@unimib.it (A.C.)
Abstract: Peripheral neurotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor for the clinical use of platinum derivatives that are a class of anticancer drugs which includes cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. In particular cisplatin and oxaliplatin induce a severe peripheral neurotoxicity while carboplatin is less neurotoxic.
The mechanisms proposed to explain neurotoxicity of these drugs are alteration of dorsal root ganglia, involvement of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Oxaliplatin also causes an acute and reversible painful neuropathy, supposed to be caused by a transient dysfunction of the voltage-gated sodium channels of peripheral nerves. Recent studies suggest that individual genetic variation may play a role in the pathogenesis of platinum drugs neurotoxicity.
Even though many mechanisms explaining neurotoxicity of these drugs have been proposed, the pathogenesis is far to be clearly defined.
In this review we will summarize the current knowledge and the most up-to-date hypothesis on the pathogenesis of this kind of peripheral neuropathy.

Type of paper: Review
Title:
Toxicity of Bortezomib
Author:
C. Meregalli
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Milan Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, 20900 Monza (MB), Italy; Phone: +39 0264488122, Fax: +39 0264488250; E-Mail: cristina.meregalli@unimib.it
Abstract:
The boronic acid dipeptide Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor drug to enter into clinical practice, able to induce tumor cell death by degradation of key proteins. It is employed as first-line treatment in relapsed or resistant multiple myeloma (MM) patients. However, bortezomib often induces a dose-limiting toxicity as painful sensory neuropathy, which has been reduced mainly by subcutaneous administration or dose modification. In this review we focus on the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of bortezomib-induced neuropathy to allow further studies in animal models and humans, including clinical and pharmacogenetic aspects, to optimize the treatment regimens.

Last update: 2 July 2015

Toxics EISSN 2305-6304 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert