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Special Issue "Sustainable Wildlife Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shelley Burgin

Faculty of Society and Design, Bond University, Gold Coast QLD 4229, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +61-7-5595-2189
Interests: wildlife management; biodiversity preservation; ecosystem degradation; animal ecology (aquatic and terrestrial); education and awareness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is an escalating world human population which shows no sign of abating, and associated human activities are increasingly impacting on native wildlife. As a consequence, across the globe, in cities, agricultural landscapes, rivers, oceans, deserts, and even within areas set aside for the conservation of wildlife, there are many ‘losers’ with relatively few ‘winners’, even among those protected within lands set aside for the wildlife conservation. Few taxa, therefore, are truly being managed sustainably anywhere in the world. Without sustainability, however, the impacts on single species, assemblages, and ecosystems will continue with the degradation of habitats, and extinctions of species. This Special Issue of Sustainability seeks to provide a forum to discuss wildlife sustainability. Submission of papers dealing with sustainability of wildlife in any of its nuances is encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Shelley Burgin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wildlife policy and practice
  • native species management
  • sustainable harvest
  • wildlife habitat retention
  • feral species management
  • endemic species sustainability
  • species loss
  • over-abundant species
  • wildlife exploitation
  • wildlife ecology
  • wildlife futures

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Assessing the Habitat Suitability of Dam Reservoirs: A Quantitative Model and Case Study of the Hantan River Dam, South Korea
Sustainability 2016, 8(11), 1117; doi:10.3390/su8111117
Received: 21 August 2016 / Revised: 23 October 2016 / Accepted: 27 October 2016 / Published: 1 November 2016
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Abstract
The main objective of this study was to investigate ecologically healthy regions near a dam reservoir. This study developed a model for assessing habitat suitability as a proxy for the ecological value of reservoirs. Three main factors comprising nine assessment variables were selected
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The main objective of this study was to investigate ecologically healthy regions near a dam reservoir. This study developed a model for assessing habitat suitability as a proxy for the ecological value of reservoirs. Three main factors comprising nine assessment variables were selected and classified as having a habitat suitability (HS) between 0 and 1: (1) geomorphic factors of altitude, slope steepness, and slope aspect; (2) vegetation factors of forest physiognomy, vegetation type, and tree age; and (3) ecological factors of land cover, ecological quality index, and environmental conservation value assessment. The spatial distribution of the nine HS indices was determined using geographic information systems and combined into one HS index value to determine ecologically healthy regions. The assessment model was applied to areas surrounding the Hantan River Dam, South Korea. To verify the model, wildlife location data from the national ecosystem survey of the Ministry of Environment were used. Areas with an HS index between 0.73 and 1 were found to contain 72% of observed wildlife locations. Ecologically healthy areas were identified by adding the indices of each variable. The methods shown here will be useful for establishing ecological restoration plans for dam reservoirs in South Korea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Management)
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Open AccessArticle Modeling the Habitat of the Red-Crowned Crane (Grus japonensis) Wintering in Cheorwon-Gun to Support Decision Making
Sustainability 2016, 8(6), 576; doi:10.3390/su8060576
Received: 23 March 2016 / Revised: 12 June 2016 / Accepted: 14 June 2016 / Published: 18 June 2016
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Abstract
Cheorwon-gun is an important wintering area for the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis). Although eco-tourism has been recently proposed as a means to stimulate the local economy, it may have adverse effects on the crane. We believe a science-based conservation plan is
[...] Read more.
Cheorwon-gun is an important wintering area for the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis). Although eco-tourism has been recently proposed as a means to stimulate the local economy, it may have adverse effects on the crane. We believe a science-based conservation plan is needed to mitigate these negative effects. To this end, our study had three objectives: (1) to analyze the red-crowned crane habitat and its suitability in Cheorwon-gun, using field surveys and habitat modeling; (2) to check the feasibility of alternative habitat patches across demilitarized zones (DMZs); and (3) to propose a conceptual diagram that minimizes habitat loss during development activities. We aim to quantify habitat suitability, the farmland area needed to support existing crane populations in wintertime, disturbance caused by human activities, and vehicular spatial patterns. These data could be used in spatial planning. The framework of this study and the process of making a conceptual diagram could be applied to other areas where there is a conflict between development and habitat conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Management)

Review

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Open AccessReview Urban Recreational Fisheries in the Australian Coastal Zone: The Sustainability Challenge
Sustainability 2017, 9(3), 422; doi:10.3390/su9030422
Received: 1 December 2016 / Revised: 27 January 2017 / Accepted: 11 February 2017 / Published: 13 March 2017
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Abstract
Recreational fishing is an important wildlife harvesting activity in urban coastal areas, and recreational harvest in these areas can frequently exceed the commercial harvest. Recreational fishing is a key way that many members of the public experience the environment. The activity enhances social
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Recreational fishing is an important wildlife harvesting activity in urban coastal areas, and recreational harvest in these areas can frequently exceed the commercial harvest. Recreational fishing is a key way that many members of the public experience the environment. The activity enhances social capital, promotes respect for nature, provides health benefits and can provide economic benefits to coastal communities. It is also an important driver of the science on aquatic animals and habitats, and an important tangible reason for many members of the public to conserve and protect aquatic resources. Overall, there has been little specific consideration of urban recreational fisheries management in Australia, despite the paramount importance of urban areas as a focus of recreational fishing activity. This paper identifies that in order to maximize individual and societal benefits from recreational fishing, there needs to be a refocussing of management with the aim of being more holistic. Historically, fisheries management in Australia has focused on maximum sustainable yield (MSY) or maximum economic yield (MEY) which is relevant for the commercial fishing sector, but neither of these is directly relevant to recreational fisheries. This paper identifies that Urban Fisheries Management Plans are required that recognize the specific issues associated with urban recreational fisheries. These plans need to coordinate within and between levels of government and have clear management objectives relevant to urban recreational fisheries. Enhanced opportunities for meaningful citizen science can be incorporated at multiple levels within these plans and this can engender public support for environmental stewardship, as well as fill a very important gap in the knowledge base necessary for managing the activity. As urban recreational fisheries are often occurring in highly modified or degraded habitats, a central element of these plans needs to be habitat restoration and this can have broader benefits for aquatic health. Other management tools include habitat creation (e.g., artificial reefs), optimization of coastal infrastructure as fisheries habitat, and stock enhancement. Overall, Urban Fisheries Management Plans represent a necessary evolution of fisheries management to better address the specific challenges of urban recreational fisheries management, and to best ensure that benefits are optimised. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Management)
Open AccessReview Indirect Consequences of Recreational Fishing in Freshwater Ecosystems: An Exploration from an Australian Perspective
Sustainability 2017, 9(2), 280; doi:10.3390/su9020280
Received: 17 November 2016 / Revised: 30 January 2017 / Accepted: 4 February 2017 / Published: 16 February 2017
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Abstract
Recreational fishing in freshwater ecosystems is a popular pastime in Australia. Although most native fish are endemic, the fauna is depauperate compared to any landmass of similar size. With commercial fishing no longer a major industry in the country’s freshwaters, the future sustainability
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Recreational fishing in freshwater ecosystems is a popular pastime in Australia. Although most native fish are endemic, the fauna is depauperate compared to any landmass of similar size. With commercial fishing no longer a major industry in the country’s freshwaters, the future sustainability of these ecosystems will depend heavily on the actions of recreational fishers. However, there has been limited focus on the consequences of recreational fishing in freshwaters. There is particularly a dearth of information on the indirect consequences of fishers on the waterbodies they depend on for their sport. After outlining the respective trends in commercial and recreational fishing in Australia as a basis for placing the sport in context, the indirect impacts of fishers on water quality, movement (walking, off-road vehicles), the introduction/translocation of fauna (particularly fish), the dispersal of flora and the transmission of fish disease and pathogens are reviewed. It is concluded that with the decline of commercial fishing, the competition between commercial fin-fishing and recreational fishing is negligible, at least throughout most of the country. It is also concluded that each of the issues addressed has the potential to be detrimental to the long-term sustainability of the freshwater ecosystems that the fishers depend on for their recreation. However, information on these issues is scant. This is despite the current and predicted popularity of freshwater recreational fishing continuing to increase in Australia. Indeed, there has been insufficient quantitative assessment of the impacts to even determine what is required to ensure a comprehensive, adequate and representative protection of these freshwater ecosystems. To underpin the sustainability of inland recreational fishing in the country, it was concluded that research is required to underpin the development and implementation of appropriate policies. The alternative is that the integrity and biodiversity loss of these ecosystems will ultimately result in their collapse before the indirect consequences of recreational fishing have been directly assessed and appropriately protected. However, the lack of protection of wetlands is not restricted to Australia; there is a deficit of freshwater protected areas worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Management)
Open AccessReview A Meta-Analysis of Human–Wildlife Conflict: South African and Global Perspectives
Sustainability 2017, 9(1), 34; doi:10.3390/su9010034
Received: 4 October 2016 / Revised: 19 December 2016 / Accepted: 23 December 2016 / Published: 28 December 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (954 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Human–wildlife conflict (HWC), due to competition for shared natural resources between people and wildlife, influences food security of people and the well-being of people and animals. HWC is a major concern in developing countries, affecting people of different socio-economic classes. We conducted a
[...] Read more.
Human–wildlife conflict (HWC), due to competition for shared natural resources between people and wildlife, influences food security of people and the well-being of people and animals. HWC is a major concern in developing countries, affecting people of different socio-economic classes. We conducted a meta-analysis of the occurrence of published scientific reports on HWC globally and South Africa particularly, to identify vulnerable human communities and their farming practices in developing and developed countries, and vulnerable wildlife guilds. We accessed Institute for Scientific Information publications from 1994 to 2015. Local communities (people living contiguous with protected natural areas) and commercial farmers jointly experienced the highest HWC incidences compared to subsistence farmers, possibly due to reporting bias for commercial farmers. Rural people in Africa and Asia experienced conflict with a diversity of mammals, confirming our expectation that developing countries could potentially experience regular encounters with wildlife. South Africa had more HWC cases than developed countries (e.g., in Australia and North America), yet the dichotomy between first world and third world economies in South Africa provides a regional exemplar of global patterns in HWC. Globally, HWC involved mainly mammals and birds, with carnivores and primates as the most high-scale conflict species and thus were a severely persecuted group. Our foundational research provides the first global assessment of HWC and showed that people in developing countries are vulnerable to HWC, perhaps related to reduced protection of livestock and crops against a larger guild of problem mammals. We suggest that a wider range of literature, including governmental and non-governmental publications, be surveyed to contribute to further research in this area of study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Management)
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