Next Article in Journal
An Expert-Based Assessment Model for Evaluating Habitat Suitability of Pond-Breeding Amphibians
Next Article in Special Issue
Urban Recreational Fisheries in the Australian Coastal Zone: The Sustainability Challenge
Previous Article in Journal
Exergetic Aspects of Hydrogen Energy Systems—The Case Study of a Fuel Cell Bus
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Meta-Analysis of Human–Wildlife Conflict: South African and Global Perspectives
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Sustainability 2017, 9(2), 280; doi:10.3390/su9020280

Indirect Consequences of Recreational Fishing in Freshwater Ecosystems: An Exploration from an Australian Perspective

School of Health and Science, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, South Penrith Distribution Centre, Penrith 2751, Australia
Academic Editor: Iain Gordon
Received: 17 November 2016 / Revised: 30 January 2017 / Accepted: 4 February 2017 / Published: 16 February 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Wildlife Management)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [270 KB, uploaded 16 February 2017]

Abstract

Recreational fishing in freshwater ecosystems is a popular pastime in Australia. Although most native fish are endemic, the fauna is depauperate compared to any landmass of similar size. With commercial fishing no longer a major industry in the country’s freshwaters, the future sustainability of these ecosystems will depend heavily on the actions of recreational fishers. However, there has been limited focus on the consequences of recreational fishing in freshwaters. There is particularly a dearth of information on the indirect consequences of fishers on the waterbodies they depend on for their sport. After outlining the respective trends in commercial and recreational fishing in Australia as a basis for placing the sport in context, the indirect impacts of fishers on water quality, movement (walking, off-road vehicles), the introduction/translocation of fauna (particularly fish), the dispersal of flora and the transmission of fish disease and pathogens are reviewed. It is concluded that with the decline of commercial fishing, the competition between commercial fin-fishing and recreational fishing is negligible, at least throughout most of the country. It is also concluded that each of the issues addressed has the potential to be detrimental to the long-term sustainability of the freshwater ecosystems that the fishers depend on for their recreation. However, information on these issues is scant. This is despite the current and predicted popularity of freshwater recreational fishing continuing to increase in Australia. Indeed, there has been insufficient quantitative assessment of the impacts to even determine what is required to ensure a comprehensive, adequate and representative protection of these freshwater ecosystems. To underpin the sustainability of inland recreational fishing in the country, it was concluded that research is required to underpin the development and implementation of appropriate policies. The alternative is that the integrity and biodiversity loss of these ecosystems will ultimately result in their collapse before the indirect consequences of recreational fishing have been directly assessed and appropriately protected. However, the lack of protection of wetlands is not restricted to Australia; there is a deficit of freshwater protected areas worldwide. View Full-Text
Keywords: angling; commercial competition; inland wetlands; boating; water quality; off-road vehicles; fishermen wading; wetland integrity; fish translocation; disease and pathogen transmission angling; commercial competition; inland wetlands; boating; water quality; off-road vehicles; fishermen wading; wetland integrity; fish translocation; disease and pathogen transmission
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Scifeed alert for new publications

Never miss any articles matching your research from any publisher
  • Get alerts for new papers matching your research
  • Find out the new papers from selected authors
  • Updated daily for 49'000+ journals and 6000+ publishers
  • Define your Scifeed now

SciFeed Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Burgin, S. Indirect Consequences of Recreational Fishing in Freshwater Ecosystems: An Exploration from an Australian Perspective. Sustainability 2017, 9, 280.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top