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Special Issue "Circular Economy—Sustainable Energy and Waste Policies"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Eui-Chan Jeon

Sejong University, Korea
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Interests: environmental policy analysis; national GHG emission factor development
Guest Editor
Dr. Hana Kim

Sejong University, Korea
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Interests: energy and climate policy; input–output analysis; governance structure of environmental policies
Guest Editor
Dr. Donghun Lee

University of Seoul, Korea
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Interests: waste management; waste-to-energy; circular economy
Guest Editor
Dr. William Latham

University of Delaware, US
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Interests: economic impacts of environmental policies; economic development and environmental policies
Guest Editor
Dr. Manu Mathai

Azim Premji University, India
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Interests: sustainability in planning and practice; nuclear power; renewable energy; green economy
Guest Editor
Dr. Chacrit Sitdhiwej

Thammasat University, Thailand
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Interests: energy law and policy; public administration; environmental law and policy

Special Issue Information

The limitations of a linear economy have been observed. The representative example is climate change. The dichotomy that separate environment from economy and treat environment as inputs for economic activities or sites for waste disposal cannot be sustained anymore. A circular economy is an imperative and new paradigm for us to pursue. This Special Issue aims to collect up-to-date research articles that explore and examine sustainable energy and waste policies from a more comprehensive perspective. This Special Issue will incorporate research articles that examine current energy and waste policies, qualitatively and quantitatively (e.g., life-cycle-assessment, energy modeling, etc.).

Dr. Eui-Chan Jeon
Dr. Hana Kim
Dr. Donghun Lee
Dr. William Latham
Dr. Manu Mathai
Dr. Chacrit Sitdhiwej
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • circular economy
  • waste policies
  • energy policies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Promotion of Environmental Management in the South Korean Health Sector—Case Study
Sustainability 2018, 10(6), 2081; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10062081
Received: 14 May 2018 / Revised: 10 June 2018 / Accepted: 16 June 2018 / Published: 19 June 2018
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Abstract
Because of the comprehensiveness and urgency of environmental challenges, every stakeholder needs to be engaged in reducing environmental impacts. The healthcare sector has rarely been studied, despite its intense effects on the environment, particularly through generating various forms of hazardous waste and intensively
[...] Read more.
Because of the comprehensiveness and urgency of environmental challenges, every stakeholder needs to be engaged in reducing environmental impacts. The healthcare sector has rarely been studied, despite its intense effects on the environment, particularly through generating various forms of hazardous waste and intensively consuming energy and water. Many healthcare facilities exist in South Korea, and every citizen frequently visits hospitals thanks to the convenient system. To reduce the environmental impacts of the healthcare sector, the South Korean government has implemented various policy measures aimed at promoting environmental management in that sector. This study evaluated the eco-efficiencies of 21 hospitals from 2012 to 2015 using data envelopment assessment (DEA), used the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) to analyze hospital staff members’ answers to a questionnaire asking about the relative importance and performance of individual environmental management tasks, and also identified environmental management tasks that should be prioritized by building an importance-performance analysis (IPA) matrix using those questionnaire responses. This study found that eco-efficiencies have improved during the period, and that mandatory policy measures were more effective than voluntary agreements for improving eco-efficiency. This implies that rigorous reporting and monitoring should be implemented along with any voluntary agreement. In addition, this study found that the top priorities are “establishment of vision and strategy for environmental management” and “organization of task team for environmental management and task assignment”. This shows the necessity of additional policy measures, such as training or consulting to promote the priorities. In addition to policy recommendations for diffusing environmental management in the South Korean healthcare sector, the methodological approach sheds light for researchers interested in environmental management in the healthcare sector because previous studies depended on qualitative approaches, particularly case studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy—Sustainable Energy and Waste Policies)
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Open AccessArticle Designing Business Solutions for Plastic Waste Management to Enhance Circular Transitions in Kenya
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1664; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051664
Received: 23 March 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 9 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
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Abstract
Least-developed countries face many challenges regarding their plastic waste management systems. In 2017, Kenya imposed a selective ban targeting manufacturers and consumers of plastic carrier bags. However, this selectivity does not avoid the continuous use of other plastic products. The present paper states
[...] Read more.
Least-developed countries face many challenges regarding their plastic waste management systems. In 2017, Kenya imposed a selective ban targeting manufacturers and consumers of plastic carrier bags. However, this selectivity does not avoid the continuous use of other plastic products. The present paper states that circular priorities, which have been defined to advanced economies, would not be entirely valid for the rest of the world. While high-income countries face only the impacts of their own consumption, developing nations must endure the externalities of these developed economies. Thus, the focus of the least developed part of the world must not be on reducing its relatively normal (or even low) consumption, but to manage its surplus material flow. According to the employed circular evaluation methodology (CEV—Circular Economic Value), the circularity level in Kenya’s plastic material flow stands on a rather low stage with 32.72%. This result outlines the linear deficiencies of the plastic waste management system and urges the prevention of further material leakage (such as energy use). Through the Business Model Canvas (BMC) approach this study offers a holistic business solution which can improve the system’s sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy—Sustainable Energy and Waste Policies)
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Open AccessArticle Family Businesses Transitioning to a Circular Economy Model: The Case of “Mercadona”
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 538; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020538
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 13 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1346 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sustainability addresses environmental and social issues affecting this and future generations. When family businesses perceive that the community is disrupted, recognize an environmental problem and respond by implementing new environmental policies or regulations, the family business’s socio-emotional values press to transition to a
[...] Read more.
Sustainability addresses environmental and social issues affecting this and future generations. When family businesses perceive that the community is disrupted, recognize an environmental problem and respond by implementing new environmental policies or regulations, the family business’s socio-emotional values press to transition to a more sustainable production system, such as the ‘Circular Economy.’ Drawing on the Dubin (1978) methodology—a paradigm for building models through deduction—we design a sustainable model, which shows family businesses’ responses to changes in the environment. It explains the reasons why family firms transition to the Circular Economy, based on the theory of Socio-Emotional Wealth (SEW). We check the model through the case study of the food retail leader in the Spanish market—Mercadona—which applies policies about energy, resources and waste to become a Circular Economy business model. Because of the strong family character of Mercadona, this case can be useful for the decision-making of other family businesses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Circular Economy—Sustainable Energy and Waste Policies)
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