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Special Issue "Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014"

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A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 July 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Yongrok Choi (Website)

Department of International Trade, Inha University, Inharo 100, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751, Republic of Korea
Phone: +82+2-10-3281-8790
Fax: +82328769328
Interests: sustainable development; Sustainable e-governance
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ning Zhang (Website)

1 School of Economics, Jinan University, No. 601, West of Huangpu Avenue, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510632, China
2 Institute of Poyang Lake Eco-economics, Jiangxi University of Finance and Economics, Nanchang 330013, China
3 Faculty of Geosciences and Environmental Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 611756, China
Phone: +86-791-8381-0553
Fax: +86-791-8381-0892
Interests: environmental economics; energy economics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will consist of selected papers from the Sustainable Asia Conference 2014, an international conference held in Nanchang, China, during April 23-25, 2014. SAC 2014 is one of the leading international conferences for presenting novel and fundamental advances in Sustainable Development issues for Asia. The purpose of the conference is for scientists, scholars, engineers, and students from universities and research institutes around the world to present ongoing research activities, so as to promote global research networking in the sustainable development area. This conference provides opportunities for the delegates to exchange new ideas and application experiences face to face, to establish research or business relations, and to find global partners for future collaboration. The scope of this Special Issue encompasses topics related to sustainable development and management at both the macro- and micro-levels in Asian countries

Prof. Dr. Yongrok Choi
Dr. Ning Zhang
Guest Editors

Notes for Prospective Authors

Selected papers from the Sustainable Asia Conference (SAC 2014) will primarily be considered for publication. Besides these, there may be a separate “open call for submission of papers”. The proposed papers should neither have been previously published nor be under active consideration for publication elsewhere. All submissions should meet Sustainability author guidelines (http://www.journals.elsevier.com/technological-forecasting-and-social-change/call-for-papers/sustainable-e-governance-in-northeast-asia-challenges-for-su/)

Important Dates

Papers that are currently under preparation are welcome, but we also expect papers to be written as a result of this call. The deadline for submission is July 31, 2014. Early submission is strongly recommended. The refereeing process starts once the paper is received (starting from April 30, 2014).

1) Submission date for authors: April 30, 2014
2) Deadline for manuscript submission for review: July 31, 2014
3) Expected date for fully refereed and revised papers to be delivered for production: September 30, 2014
4) Target Publication Date: November 30, 2014

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs).


Keywords

  • sustainable development policy in asia
  • sustainable business strategies and case studies in asia
  • green growth and the low carbon economy in asia
  • energy efficiency and greenhouse emission control in asia
  • sustainable and governance-oriented it & e-business in asia
  • sustainability indicators and new methodologies

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Introduction to the Special Issue on “the Sustainable Asia Conference 2014”
Sustainability 2015, 7(2), 1595-1602; doi:10.3390/su7021595
Received: 29 January 2015 / Revised: 29 January 2015 / Accepted: 29 January 2015 / Published: 2 February 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (632 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The continuous expansion and change in Asia is attracting increasing attention from the rest of the world. Thus, the papers from the Sustainable Asia Conference 2014 (SAC 2014) could provide a platform to examine outperforming governance factors and mechanisms in this dynamically [...] Read more.
The continuous expansion and change in Asia is attracting increasing attention from the rest of the world. Thus, the papers from the Sustainable Asia Conference 2014 (SAC 2014) could provide a platform to examine outperforming governance factors and mechanisms in this dynamically growing region. This editorial for SAC 2014 will highlight the contents and methodologies of selected papers, presenting diverse issues in sustainable policies and strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Research on Rural Nonpoint Source Pollution in the Process of Urban-Rural Integration in the Economically-Developed Area in China Based on the Improved STIRPAT Model
Sustainability 2015, 7(1), 782-793; doi:10.3390/su7010782
Received: 26 June 2014 / Accepted: 31 December 2014 / Published: 12 January 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (746 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The process of urban-rural integration has led to severe ecological environmental pollution in rural areas of China, particularly in the economically-developed areas. This is an urgent issue to be solved. We select Jiangsu Province as a case study. From the perspective of [...] Read more.
The process of urban-rural integration has led to severe ecological environmental pollution in rural areas of China, particularly in the economically-developed areas. This is an urgent issue to be solved. We select Jiangsu Province as a case study. From the perspective of the population, economic scale, energy consumption and financial support, we perform an empirical study of rural non-point source pollution problems in the process of urbanization based on the improved STIRPAT model. We apply the ridge regression method to avoid the multicollinearity of the variables in the STIRPAT model. The results show that the technological level, the size of the population and financial support are important factors affecting rural non-point source pollution. Therefore, we believe that technical progress, transformation of the mode of production and increasing the scale of financial support in rural areas are effective measures to solve the current rural nonpoint source pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Is It Feasible for China to Optimize Oil Import Source Diversification?
Sustainability 2014, 6(11), 8329-8341; doi:10.3390/su6118329
Received: 29 June 2014 / Revised: 27 October 2014 / Accepted: 13 November 2014 / Published: 21 November 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1268 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In 2013, China imported 282 million tons of crude oil with an external dependence of 58.1%, surpassing the USA as the world’s largest net oil importer. An import source diversification strategy has been adopted by China to ensure oil supply security and [...] Read more.
In 2013, China imported 282 million tons of crude oil with an external dependence of 58.1%, surpassing the USA as the world’s largest net oil importer. An import source diversification strategy has been adopted by China to ensure oil supply security and to prevent oil supply disruption. However, the strategy is restricted by the imbalance of oil reserves. What is the reasonable and clear objective of the diversification strategy under an imbalanced environment? How do we assess the natural imbalance? This paper analyzes the oil import diversification of China and the USA, as well as the oil production of oil export countries by the oil import source diversification index (OISDI). Our results are as follows: the distribution of oil import sources for China tends to coincide with the oil production distribution of oil exporters in the world. Compared with the USA, China has more diversified import sources. The Chinese government paid much attention to import sources in the past. In the future, China will adjust the distributions of regional sources rather than focus on the number of sources to further optimize the structure of imported regions in the course of implementing the import source diversification strategy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Can China’s Industrial SO2 Emissions Trading Pilot Scheme Reduce Pollution Abatement Costs?
Sustainability 2014, 6(11), 7621-7645; doi:10.3390/su6117621
Received: 28 July 2014 / Revised: 17 October 2014 / Accepted: 27 October 2014 / Published: 31 October 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (860 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper evaluates the effects of China’s industrial SO2 emissions trading pilot scheme (SETPS) on the pollution abatement costs (PAC) from the past and future perspective. We apply the kernel-based propensity score difference-in-difference method to examine the effects of SETPS on [...] Read more.
This paper evaluates the effects of China’s industrial SO2 emissions trading pilot scheme (SETPS) on the pollution abatement costs (PAC) from the past and future perspective. We apply the kernel-based propensity score difference-in-difference method to examine the effects of SETPS on the average pollution abatement costs (APAC) and the marginal pollution abatement costs (MPAC) based on the environment data from the industrial sector of 29 provinces in China over the period of 1998 to 2011. Our findings are that SETPS failed to reduce PAC as a whole. During 2002 to 2011, SETPS increased APAC by 1310 RMB per ton on average and had an insignificant negative effect on MPAC. Nevertheless, the conclusions would be markedly different if we separately investigated the effects of SETPS each year of the pilot period. The positive effects of SETPS on PAC started to appear since 2009, and SETPS significantly reduced both APAC and MPAC, especially in 2009 and 2011. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Figures

Open AccessArticle A Site Selection Model for a Straw-Based Power Generation Plant with CO2 Emissions
Sustainability 2014, 6(10), 7466-7481; doi:10.3390/su6107466
Received: 28 August 2014 / Revised: 24 September 2014 / Accepted: 15 October 2014 / Published: 23 October 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (733 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The decision on the location of a straw-based power generation plant has a great influence on the plant’s operation and performance. This study explores traditional theories for site selection. Using integer programming, the study optimizes the economic and carbon emission outcomes of [...] Read more.
The decision on the location of a straw-based power generation plant has a great influence on the plant’s operation and performance. This study explores traditional theories for site selection. Using integer programming, the study optimizes the economic and carbon emission outcomes of straw-based power generation as two objectives, with the supply and demand of straw as constraints. It provides a multi-objective mixed-integer programming model to solve the site selection problem for a straw-based power generation plant. It then provides a case study to demonstrate the application of the model in the decision on the site selection for a straw-based power generation plant with a Chinese region. Finally, the paper discusses the result of the model in the context of the wider aspect of straw-based power generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Chinese Public Willingness to Pay to Avoid Having Nuclear Power Plants in the Neighborhood
Sustainability 2014, 6(10), 7197-7223; doi:10.3390/su6107197
Received: 30 July 2014 / Accepted: 23 September 2014 / Published: 17 October 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (921 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In spite of the decreasing share of nuclear power all over the world, China resumed the approval of large-scale construction of nuclear power plants in 2012. However, influenced by the worldwide spreading anti-nuclear attitudes, people who live near nuclear power plants showed [...] Read more.
In spite of the decreasing share of nuclear power all over the world, China resumed the approval of large-scale construction of nuclear power plants in 2012. However, influenced by the worldwide spreading anti-nuclear attitudes, people who live near nuclear power plants showed increasing concerns about nuclear risks. Consequently, the Not In My Backyard (NIMBY) syndrome of nuclear power plants should be evaluated prudently to support the healthy development of nuclear power in China. Based on the face-to-face survey data, this study estimates Chinese public willingness to pay (WTP) to avoid having nuclear power plants in the neighborhood. The respondents include both residents who currently live near and those who would live near nuclear power plants in the future. Considering the possible presence of the sample selection bias caused by protest responses, this paper constructs a two-step sample selection model with the protest responses and the double bounded dichotomous choice (DBDC) questions. Using the Contingent Valuation Method (CVM), we measure the effects of influencing factors of public WTP and study the decay of WTP with longer distances from nuclear power plants. The results suggest that most people are willing to pay higher electricity prices to avoid having nuclear power plants in the neighborhood. Comparing the WTP to avoid having nuclear power plants nearby with the current electricity price, we find that there is an increase of 56.7% and 69.1% of respondents’ WTP for a nuclear power plant located 80 km and 30 km, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Determinants of Farmers’ Willingness to Pay and Its Level for Ecological Compensation of Poyang Lake Wetland, China: A Household-Level Survey
Sustainability 2014, 6(10), 6714-6728; doi:10.3390/su6106714
Received: 29 July 2014 / Revised: 31 August 2014 / Accepted: 23 September 2014 / Published: 29 September 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (866 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study examines the determinants of farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP) and their payment levels for ecological compensation of the Poyang Lake Wetland in China. We developed a farmer household survey and gathered 292 effective responses. The contingent valuation method (CVM) and [...] Read more.
This study examines the determinants of farmers’ willingness to pay (WTP) and their payment levels for ecological compensation of the Poyang Lake Wetland in China. We developed a farmer household survey and gathered 292 effective responses. The contingent valuation method (CVM) and Heckman’s two-step model were employed for the empirical study. Results show that 46.58% of farmers are willing to pay ecological compensation, with an average price of $64.39/household per year. The influencing factors that significantly influence farmers’ WTP include household income, residential location, emphasis on improvement of wetland resources, arable land area, and contracted water area. In addition, household income, residential location, arable land area, and contracted water area are significantly related to their payment levels. The results of this empirical study inform important policy implications and recommendations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Sources of China’s Economic Growth: An Empirical Analysis Based on the BML Index with Green Growth Accounting
Sustainability 2014, 6(9), 5983-6004; doi:10.3390/su6095983
Received: 7 July 2014 / Revised: 18 August 2014 / Accepted: 26 August 2014 / Published: 5 September 2014
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (929 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study develops a biennial Malmquist–Luenberger  productivity index that is used to measure the sources of economic growth by utilizing data envelopment analysis and the directional distance function. Taking restrictions on resources and the environment into account based on the green growth [...] Read more.
This study develops a biennial Malmquist–Luenberger  productivity index that is used to measure the sources of economic growth by utilizing data envelopment analysis and the directional distance function. Taking restrictions on resources and the environment into account based on the green growth accounting framework; we split economic growth into seven components: technical efficiency change, technological change, labor effect, capital effect, energy effect, output structure effect and environmental regulation effect. Further, we apply the Silverman test and Li-Fan-Ullah nonparametric test in combination with kernel distribution to test for the counterfactual contributions at the provincial level in China from 1998 to 2012. The empirical results show that: (1) technological progress and TFP make positive contributions to economic growth in China, while technical efficiency drags it down; (2) the effect of output structure and CO2 emissions with environmental regulation restrain economic growth in some provinces; and (3) overall, physical capital accumulation is the most important driving force for economic take-off, irrespective of whether the government adopts environmental regulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Carbon Emissions in China: A Spatial Econometric Analysis at the Regional Level
Sustainability 2014, 6(9), 6005-6023; doi:10.3390/su6096005
Received: 23 July 2014 / Revised: 1 September 2014 / Accepted: 2 September 2014 / Published: 5 September 2014
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (734 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An extended Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT) model, incorporating factors that drive carbon emissions, is built from the regional perspective. A spatial Durbin model is applied to investigate the factors, including population, urbanization level, economic development, energy [...] Read more.
An extended Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology (STIRPAT) model, incorporating factors that drive carbon emissions, is built from the regional perspective. A spatial Durbin model is applied to investigate the factors, including population, urbanization level, economic development, energy intensity, industrial structure, energy consumption structure, energy price, and openness, that impact both the scale and intensity of carbon emissions. After performing the model, we find that the revealed negative and significant impact of spatial-lagged variables suggests that the carbon emissions among regions are highly correlated. Therefore, the empirical results suggest that the provinces are doing an exemplary job of lowering carbon emissions. The driving factors, with the exception of energy prices, significantly impact carbon emissions both directly and indirectly. We, thus, argue that spatial correlation, endogeneity and externality should be taken into account in formulating polices that seek to reduce carbon emissions in China. Carbon emissions will not be met by controlling economic development, but by energy consumption and low-carbon path. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Sustainable E-Governance: The Relationship among Trust, Digital Divide, and E-Government
Sustainability 2014, 6(9), 6049-6069; doi:10.3390/su6096049
Received: 4 June 2014 / Revised: 12 August 2014 / Accepted: 25 August 2014 / Published: 5 September 2014
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (804 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study empirically examines the correlation between the quality of e-government and trust in government. It used survey data collected in 2013 from the metropolitan areas of Seoul. An index was developed to measure the quality of e-government services, and the Gov [...] Read more.
This study empirically examines the correlation between the quality of e-government and trust in government. It used survey data collected in 2013 from the metropolitan areas of Seoul. An index was developed to measure the quality of e-government services, and the Gov 3.0 values were reflected in the analysis, including openness, sharing, communication, and collaboration. The results show a partial correlation between the quality of e-government service and trust in government. In addition, the level of trust varied according to the different type of the digital divide groups. It suggests that as ICT (Information Communication Technology) has become more sophisticated, a willingness to share information among organizations and stakeholders may become a major factor to thoseactively seeking information and resources to make value-added products. It also suggests that more integrated data management including network securityand an open attitude toward information sharing will be more important beyond the level of technical issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle Minimizing the Carbon Footprint for the Time-Dependent Heterogeneous-Fleet Vehicle Routing Problem with Alternative Paths
Sustainability 2014, 6(7), 4658-4684; doi:10.3390/su6074658
Received: 25 June 2014 / Revised: 13 July 2014 / Accepted: 17 July 2014 / Published: 23 July 2014
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1091 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Torespondto the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and global warming, this paper investigates the minimal-carbon-footprint time-dependent heterogeneous-fleet vehicle routing problem with alternative paths (MTHVRPP). This finds a route with the smallestcarbon footprint, instead of the shortestroute distance, which is the conventional approach, [...] Read more.
Torespondto the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and global warming, this paper investigates the minimal-carbon-footprint time-dependent heterogeneous-fleet vehicle routing problem with alternative paths (MTHVRPP). This finds a route with the smallestcarbon footprint, instead of the shortestroute distance, which is the conventional approach, to serve a number of customers with a heterogeneous fleet of vehicles in cases wherethere may not be only one path between each pair of customers, and the vehicle speed differs at different times of the day. Inheriting from the NP-hardness of the vehicle routing problem, the MTHVRPP is also NP-hard. This paper further proposes a genetic algorithm (GA) to solve this problem. The solution representedbyour GA determines the customer serving ordering of each vehicle type. Then, the capacity check is used to classify multiple routes of each vehicle type, and the path selection determines the detailed paths of each route. Additionally, this paper improves the energy consumption model used for calculating the carbon footprint amount more precisely. Compared with the results without alternative paths, our experimental results show that the alternative path in this experimenthas a significant impact on the experimental results in terms of carbon footprint. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)
Open AccessArticle The Role of Intermediation in the Governance of Sustainable Chinese Web Marketing
Sustainability 2014, 6(7), 4102-4118; doi:10.3390/su6074102
Received: 16 June 2014 / Revised: 21 June 2014 / Accepted: 23 June 2014 / Published: 30 June 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1084 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper identifies the factors necessary for the sustainable performance of two Chinese web marketing companies. The companies are Alibaba and its twin, Taobao. This research is based on the structural equation model (SEM). The paper analyzes the core governance factors of [...] Read more.
This paper identifies the factors necessary for the sustainable performance of two Chinese web marketing companies. The companies are Alibaba and its twin, Taobao. This research is based on the structural equation model (SEM). The paper analyzes the core governance factors of Chinese trust (Guanxi) from outperforming web marketing mix strategies to determine if Guanxi can be applied to other web community marketing strategies. The empirical tests, in general, show the web marketing mix is important to create values in China. Three other web marketing strategies—communication, content, and commerce incorporate Guanxi with full mediation effects. Some implications concerning trust enhancement by the Chinese government and web companies are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Special issue of Sustainable Asia Conference 2014)

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