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Special Issue "Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Elena Cristina Rada

Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, Trento I-38123, Italy & Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, 46 Via G.B. Vico 46, Varese 21100, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +390461282613
Fax: +39-04-6128-2672
Interests: municipal solid waste characterization; collection; treatment; valorization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the trends in municipal solid waste (MSW) management under a circular economy perspective. The entire pathway of MSW management will be involved: From MSW characterization (with particular attention to the evolution of its composition because of the use of new products), to its source separated collection and technological solutions (to support citizens and the collection company), to its treatment in biochemical and thermochemical plants (with or without pre-treatment, including the Solid Recovered Fuel option), to the future role of landfilling. The integration of material recovery and energy recovery is expected to be discussed, taking into account the efficiency of the present and future plants. The role of biomethane from biogas treatment will be surely a topic of concern. Papers selected for this Special Issue will be subject to a peer-review procedure with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of their contents.

Dr. Elena Cristina Rada
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Municipal Solid Waste
  • Management
  • Treatment
  • Source separation
  • Energy recovery
  • Material recovery
  • Characterization
  • Biomethane

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Selective Collection Quality Index for Municipal Solid Waste Management
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 257; doi:10.3390/su10010257
Received: 8 December 2017 / Revised: 14 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
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Abstract
Trentino (an Italian Province located in the northern part of the country) is equipped with a management system of municipal solid waste collection at the forefront. Among the most positive aspects, there is a great ability for waste separation at the source and
[...] Read more.
Trentino (an Italian Province located in the northern part of the country) is equipped with a management system of municipal solid waste collection at the forefront. Among the most positive aspects, there is a great ability for waste separation at the source and a consequent low production of residual municipal solid waste for disposal. Latest data show a gross efficiency of selective collection that has recently reached 80%, one of the highest values in Italy. This study analyzed the “Trentino system” to identify the main elements that have been at the base of the current efficient model. This provided an opportunity to propose a selective collection quality index (SCQI), including collection efficiency for each fraction, method of collection, quality of the collected materials, presence of the punctual tariff and tourist incidence. A period relevant for the transition of the collection system to the recent one was chosen for the demonstrative adoption of the proposed indicators in order to determine the potential of the index adoption. Results of the analysis of this case study were obtained in a quantitative form thanks to the sub-parameters that characterize the proposed index. This allowed selected collection decision makers to focus intently on a territory to find criticalities to be solved. For instance, the use of the index and its sub-indicators in the case of Trentino identified and comparatively quantified the local problems resulting from the presence of a large museum in a small town, tourism peaks in some valleys, and a delay in the punctual tariff adoption. The index has been proposed with the aim to make available an integrated tool to analyze other areas in Italy and abroad. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management)
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Open AccessArticle From Waste Management to Component Management in the Construction Industry
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 229; doi:10.3390/su10010229
Received: 22 December 2017 / Revised: 14 January 2018 / Accepted: 15 January 2018 / Published: 17 January 2018
PDF Full-text (3369 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The construction industry uses more resources and produces more waste than any other industrial sector; sustainable development depends on the reduction of both, while providing for a growing global population. The reuse of existing building components could support this goal. However, it is
[...] Read more.
The construction industry uses more resources and produces more waste than any other industrial sector; sustainable development depends on the reduction of both, while providing for a growing global population. The reuse of existing building components could support this goal. However, it is difficult to reclaim components from demolition, and materials remain cheap compared with labour, so new approaches are needed for reuse to be implemented beyond niche projects. This study therefore reviews waste interventions. Multiple case studies, spanning new builds and refurbishment, were undertaken to examine systemic mechanisms that lead to components being discarded. Evidence from fieldwork observations, waste documentation, and interviews indicates that the generators of unwanted components effectively decide their fate, and a failure to identify components in advance, uncertainty over usefulness, the perception of cost and programme risk in reclamation, and the preferential order of the waste hierarchy mean that the decision to discard to waste management goes unchallenged. A triage process is proposed to capture timely information about existing building components to be discarded, make this information visible to a wide community, and determine usefulness by focusing creativity already present in the industry on an exhaustive examination of component reusability and upcyclability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management)
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Open AccessArticle The Diffusion Effect of MSW Recycling
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 40; doi:10.3390/su10010040
Received: 26 October 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 21 December 2017 / Published: 25 December 2017
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Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to compare the recycling performance for some waste fractions selected including food waste, bulk waste, paper, metal products, plastics/rubber and glass products and then to develop some directions for the future improvements. The priority of each waste
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this paper is to compare the recycling performance for some waste fractions selected including food waste, bulk waste, paper, metal products, plastics/rubber and glass products and then to develop some directions for the future improvements. The priority of each waste fraction for recycling is also analyzed by using an importance-performance analysis. Traditionally, the recycling rate that is calculated by the ratio of waste recycled to waste collected is used as an indicator to measure recycling performance. Due to a large variation among waste fractions in municipal solid waste (MSW), the recycling rate cannot reflect the actual recycling performance. The ceiling of recycling rate for each waste fraction estimated from the diffusion models is incorporated into a model to calculate recycling performance. The results show that (1) the diffusion effect exists significantly for the recycling of most recyclables but no evidence is found to support the diffusion effect for the recycling of food waste and bulk waste; (2) the recycling performance of waste metal products ranks the top, compared to waste paper, waste glass and other waste fractions; (3) furthermore, an importance-performance analysis (IPA) is employed to analyze the priority of recycling programs and thus this paper suggests that the recycling of food waste should be seen as the most priority item to recycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management)
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Open AccessArticle Solid Waste Disposal in Chinese Cities: An Evaluation of Local Performance
Sustainability 2017, 9(12), 2234; doi:10.3390/su9122234
Received: 20 October 2017 / Revised: 26 November 2017 / Accepted: 30 November 2017 / Published: 3 December 2017
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Abstract
China meets increasingly serious solid waste problems and has adopted various policies in response in recent years. Meanwhile, few studies have investigated the performance of solid waste disposal through statistical analysis with empirical data. This study examines provincial resource use policy’s influence on
[...] Read more.
China meets increasingly serious solid waste problems and has adopted various policies in response in recent years. Meanwhile, few studies have investigated the performance of solid waste disposal through statistical analysis with empirical data. This study examines provincial resource use policy’s influence on the comprehensive utilization rate of industrial solid waste in Chinese cities. Through comparing results for statistical analysis in the year 2009 and 2015 by multiple linear regression analysis, this study analyzes similarities and differences in the drivers for solid waste disposal in the era of the 11th Five-Year Plan and the 12th Five-Year Plan in China. It finds that the adoption of resource use policy positively increases the comprehensive utilization rate of industrial solid waste. Other factors such as industrial SO2 emission, local environmental regulations, GDP per capita, population density and educational level also affect industrial solid waste disposal. Therefore, China should continue implementing solid waste disposal policies, upgrade current industrial systems, push forward economic and social reform and increase environmental education to enhance the effectiveness of solid waste disposal for long-term sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management)
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Open AccessArticle Life Cycle Analysis of Energy Production from Food Waste through Anaerobic Digestion, Pyrolysis and Integrated Energy System
Sustainability 2017, 9(10), 1804; doi:10.3390/su9101804
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 4 October 2017 / Accepted: 4 October 2017 / Published: 5 October 2017
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Abstract
The environmental performance of industrial anaerobic digestion (AD), pyrolysis, and integrated system (AD sequence with pyrolysis) on food waste treatment were evaluated using life cycle assessment. The integrated treatment system indicated similar environmental benefits to AD with the highest benefits in climate change
[...] Read more.
The environmental performance of industrial anaerobic digestion (AD), pyrolysis, and integrated system (AD sequence with pyrolysis) on food waste treatment were evaluated using life cycle assessment. The integrated treatment system indicated similar environmental benefits to AD with the highest benefits in climate change and water depletion in addition to the increased energy generation potential and the production of valuable products (biochar and bio-oil). Pyrolysis results illustrated higher impact across water, fossil fuel, and mineral depletion, although still providing a better option than conventional landfilling of food waste. The dewatering phase in the AD process accounted for 70% of the treatment impact while the pre-treatment of the food waste was responsible for the main burden in the pyrolysis process. The study indicated that the three treatment options of food waste management are environmentally more favorable than the conventional landfilling of the wastes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Municipal Solid Waste Management)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: From Waste Management to Component Management in the Construction Industry
Authors: Colin M.* Rose and Julia A. Stegemann
Affiliation: Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
* Corresponding author: colin.rose.13@ucl.ac.uk; Tel.: +44(0)7736 475214
Abstract: The construction industry uses more resources and produces more waste than any other industrial sector; sustainable development depends on reduction of both, while providing for a growing global population.   Reuse of existing building components could support this goal. However, when it is difficult to reclaim components from demolition, and materials remain cheap compared to labour, new approaches are needed for reuse to be implemented beyond niche projects. This study therefore examines the systemic factors underpinning current construction waste management, to suggest interventions that might aid retention and enhancement of component utility. Multiple case studies were undertaken, spanning new build and refurbishment, with evidence from fieldwork observations, waste documentation and interviews. Direct reuse retains utility, but suffers severe practical and economic constraints. Upcycling enhances utility by repurposing components to displace virgin products of greater environmental impacts. Imagining viable new uses involves creativity. The paper proposes means of focusing creativity present in the industry on an exhaustive examination of component reusability and upcyclability. Proposed interventions facilitate information generation and are integrated with existing practices. They begin to create enabling conditions for the emergence of new upcycling enterprises that might overcome economic constraints, and avoid unnecessary transportation, processing and diminishing of component utility.

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