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Special Issue "Sustainable Urban Agriculture"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Francesco Orsini

Research Center on Urban Environment for Agriculture and Biodiversity (ResCUE-AB), Agricultural Sciences Department, Bologna University Alma Mater Studiorum
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0512096677
Interests: urban agriculture; plant physiology; abiotic stresses; food security
Guest Editor
Dr. Esther Sanyé-Mengual

Research Center on Urban Environment for Agriculture and Biodiversity (ResCUE-AB); Agricultural Sciences Department; Bologna University Alma Mater Studiorum
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0512096677
Interests: urban agriculture; plant physiology; abiotic stresses; food security
Guest Editor
Dr. Giorgio Gianquinto

Research Center on Urban Environment for Agriculture and Biodiversity (ResCUE-AB); Agricultural Sciences Department; Bologna University Alma Mater Studiorum
Website | E-Mail
Interests: urban agriculture; plant nutrition; soilless systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on “Sustainable Urban Agriculture” will group together contributions describing state-of-the-art experiences and researches associated with urban agriculture (UA) sustainability. Submitted papers should address one or more of the following questions:

(1)   Which cropping systems are best suited to urban conditions?
(2)   How healthy agricultural goods can be produced in urban environments?
(3)   Which technologies can be adapted or developed to boost UA performances?
(4)   How can UA reduce city environmental footprint?

Papers selected for this Special Issue will undergo a rigorous peer review procedure with the aim of rapidly and widely disseminating innovative research results and successful experiences.

Dr. Francesco Orsini
Dr. Esther Sanyé-Mengual
Dr. Giorgio Gianquinto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food security
  • Food safety
  • Growing systems
  • Urban Horticulture
  • Waste Management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Sustainable Urban Agriculture in Ghana: What Governance System Works?
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2090; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9112090
Received: 25 August 2017 / Revised: 3 November 2017 / Accepted: 9 November 2017 / Published: 14 November 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3638 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urban farming takes advantage of its proximity to market, transport and other urban infrastructure to provide food for the city and sustain the livelihoods of urban and peri-urban dwellers. It is an agricultural activity which employs more than 50% of the local urban
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Urban farming takes advantage of its proximity to market, transport and other urban infrastructure to provide food for the city and sustain the livelihoods of urban and peri-urban dwellers. It is an agricultural activity which employs more than 50% of the local urban population with positive and negative impacts on local and national development. Urban agriculture is an informal activity not supported by law but in practice is regulated to a certain extent by state institutions, traditional rulers, farmers and national and international non-governmental organisations. Tamale’s rapid population growth, exacerbated by the unplanned development system and institutional conflicts, are factors contributing to the present bottlenecks in the urban agricultural system. In this paper, these bottlenecks are conceptualised as problems of governance. These issues will be illustrated using ethnographic data from land sales, crop-livestock competition, waste-water irrigation, and markets. I will explain how conflicts which arise from these different situations are resolved through the interactions of various governance systems. Informal governance arrangements are widespread, but neither they nor formal systems are always successful in resolving governance issues. A participatory governance does not seem possible due to actors’ divergent interests. A governance solution for this sector is not yet apparent, contributing to food and nutritional insecurity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Agriculture)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Reconciling Life Cycle Environmental Impacts with Ecosystem Services: A Management Perspective on Agricultural Land Use
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030630
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 16 February 2018 / Accepted: 24 February 2018 / Published: 28 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (251 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Impacts on ecosystem services that are related to agricultural land use greatly differ depending on management practices employed. This study aimed to reveal issues associated with evaluating ecosystem services related to land use at the management level during life cycle assessment (LCA) and
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Impacts on ecosystem services that are related to agricultural land use greatly differ depending on management practices employed. This study aimed to reveal issues associated with evaluating ecosystem services related to land use at the management level during life cycle assessment (LCA) and to consider future challenges. Firstly, a relationship between agricultural ecosystem services and management practices was outlined. Then, a survey was performed to disclose the current status of assessment of impact of land use in agricultural LCA case studies that compared between different management practices. In addition, this study also investigated how management practices have been differently considered by factors that characterize ecosystem services that are related to land use. The results show that the number of agricultural LCA cases where land use impacts instead of land areas were assessed was still small. The results of limited LCA case studies, which using factors could differentiate between various management practices, suggest that although organic farming methods have been employed over large land areas, lower impact may be caused by agricultural land use. For factors developed in existing research, services related to soil quality, and some of the regulatory services were considered, those unique to agriculture were missing. Although most of factors were calculated at levels of intensity or land use type, some of them were based on a process-based model that could consider management practices. In the future, factors that characterize the impacts of land use on ecosystem services, such as carbon storage and erosion prevention, will need to be calculated at the management level. For ecosystem services, such as habitat conservation and pollination, further efforts in accumulating evaluation case studies that collect and accumulate foreground data are important. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Urban Agriculture)
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