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Special Issue "Sustainability Indicators for Renewable Energy Transition"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. George Xydis

Department of Business Development and Technology (BTECH/AU Herning), Aarhus University, Engineering & Technology Research Group–EngTech, Center for Energy Technologies–CET, Birk Centerpark 15, 7400 Herning, Denmark
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +4593508006
Interests: energy planning and resources optimization; wind resource assessment; exergy analysis; energy demand
Guest Editor
Dr. Evanthia Nanaki

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Western Macedonia, 50100 Kozani, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +030-6945555002
Interests: electric vehicles; low carbon energy systems; climate change; sustainable transportation systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable urban development is of great importance. Cities consume 75 percent of natural resources globally (materials, energy, water), produce 50 percent of global waste, and generate 60–80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions. European cities can improve their resilience and meet decarbonization targets by: (i) increasing the rate of retrofitting buildings to improve energy efficiency; (ii) enabling building and district scale renewable energy production; (iii) developing and restoring nature-based urban infrastructure; and (iv) delivering a shift towards clean mobility-as-a-service. However, global spending on basic infrastructure—transport, power, water and communications—faces a financing gap of $1 trillion annually (the global spend ought to be $3.7 trillion, whereas it is currently $2.7 trillion). Realizing these ambitions will, therefore, demand trillions of investments, as well as innovation in systemic thinking, governance and financing. This requirement for transformative change presents a significant opportunity for innovative and sustainable markets to emerge.

Dr. George Xydis
Dr. Evanthia Nanaki
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable transportation systems
  • renewable energy based transformative change
  • electric vehicles
  • energy resources optimization

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Analyzing the Impact of Theft and Vandalism in Relation to the Sustainability of Renewable Energy Development Projects in Sub-Saharan Africa
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030814
Received: 28 January 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 14 March 2018
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Abstract
Theft and vandalism impede the sustainability of renewable energy (RE) development projects in Sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, it is essential to explore where these crimes originate from, how they propagate and how they can be counteracted. In our study, we analyze the impact of
[...] Read more.
Theft and vandalism impede the sustainability of renewable energy (RE) development projects in Sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, it is essential to explore where these crimes originate from, how they propagate and how they can be counteracted. In our study, we analyze the impact of these disturbances on implemented projects. We utilize a consumer clinic approach to generate data that represents the situation. We define our instigators practically (Government Inequality, Crime to Survive, Sabotage) and demarcate the actions of the offenders into 4 types: (1) vandalization of small RE projects (SPv); (2) theft of RE infrastructures from small RE projects (SPt); (3) vandalization of large RE projects (LPv); and (4) theft of RE infrastructures from large RE projects (LPt). To counteract these actions we define three types of security interference: human, societal and technical. We model the career of an RE criminal as a multi-stage Markov model. In every stage the offender can commit any of the offences SPv, SPt, LPv, LPt, or go to rest. Transition probabilities are our means to reflect offender maturity. Crucial to our model is that they are affected by the level of interference installed at the project site. Calibrated on a dialogue with 144 respondents, our Markov model directs us to adequate interferences per project. Specifically, for large projects technical and human security are the most effective, whereas, for small projects we recommend societal security. The paper introduces a mathematical model of the career of a RE-offender including the influence of security interference and calibrates the parameters through an ethnographic approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Indicators for Renewable Energy Transition)
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Open AccessArticle Measuring the Impact of Economic Crisis to the Greek Vehicle Market
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 510; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020510
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 14 February 2018
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Abstract
The fallout of the global economic crisis has impacted Greece severely as the austerity measures that were implemented since 2009 have had a devastating effect on poverty and the level of living. The financial agreement of the Greek government with the International Monetary
[...] Read more.
The fallout of the global economic crisis has impacted Greece severely as the austerity measures that were implemented since 2009 have had a devastating effect on poverty and the level of living. The financial agreement of the Greek government with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) gave rise to a deep recession phase in the Greek market that started in early 2008. The automobile industry is among the sectors that have been severely affected by the economic crisis. Given that the demand for cars fell sharply and that the Greek car market is facing serious problems, mapping and understanding them can provide useful input to the Greek vehicle market. Regression analysis is being employed, and the interrelations of different variables, such as net disposable income, unemployment rate, fuel prices, the Greek crisis, loans directed to the vehicle market, as well as the inflation rate for the period of 2000–2016, are investigated. Analyzing the factors affecting car sales can provide policy-makers with knowledge in order to take legislative and economic measures, so as to boost sales of new environmental friendly vehicles not only in Greece, but in all EU states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability Indicators for Renewable Energy Transition)
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