E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Darko B. Vukovic

Tomsk Polytechnic University, Russian Federation; Geographical Institute “Jovan Cvijic” of Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Serbia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: economic geography; regional studies; political geography
Guest Editor
Dr. Milan Radovanovic

Geographical Institute “Jovan Cvijic” of Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Serbia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: geography; climatology; solar activity and environment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, various international, regional and national guidelines and tools have been developed on how to manage sustainable ecology and forest management. The international research on ecology and forests required holistic and participatory approaches in developing their management. These included the need to manage forest lands and resources sustainably to meet the social, economic, ecological, cultural and spiritual needs of people now and in the future. New understanding of forests as ecosystems, along with societies’ changing views of values derived from forests, has caused forest managers to adopt more comprehensive approaches to sustaining forests; concepts that in fact apply to values to be achieved outside of specific forest management units as we consider resource-dependent communities and biodiversity at landscape scales and migratory bird flight pathways and the climate change impacts of forest management. More importantly, this process must be in line with sustainable ecological needs.

In this Special Issue, potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Problems and results of environmental monitoring of condition and pollution of ecosystems, consequences of environmental pollution.
  • The role of soil biota in regulating eco-system functions/services of the forest in the conditions of combined action of natural and anthropogenic factors.
  • The concept of multipurpose continuous and sustainable forest management, ecological-economic bases of sustainable forest management.
  • Theory and practice of management of the carbon balance of forests.
  • Sustainable Recreation and Tourism. Includes recreation and tourism behavior, social and/or ecological impacts of tourism, and planning, management and policy.

We invite authors, scientist involved in theoretical, methodological and practical studies of ecology and forest management to contribute original research papers that will illustrate the continuing effort to understand developments of new techniques, methods and tools for the sustainable management of ecology and forestry.

Dr. Darko B. Vukovic
Dr. Milan Radovanovic
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable ecology
  • environmental protection
  • sustainable forest management
  • sustainable tourism

Published Papers (8 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-8
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Effects of Thinning on the Spatial Structure of Larix principis-rupprechtii Plantation
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1250; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041250
Received: 23 December 2017 / Revised: 15 April 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 19 April 2018
PDF Full-text (4689 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Structure-based forest management is a scientific and easy-to-operate method for sustainable forest management. We analyzed the stand spatial structure of Larix principis-rupprechtii plantation under five reserve densities. The results indicated that with the decrease of densities after thinning, the average mingling degree and
[...] Read more.
Structure-based forest management is a scientific and easy-to-operate method for sustainable forest management. We analyzed the stand spatial structure of Larix principis-rupprechtii plantation under five reserve densities. The results indicated that with the decrease of densities after thinning, the average mingling degree and uniform angle index had an increasing tendency, but the amplitude was small. Most of the trees were in zero mix, and a few of them were in moderate, strong, and relatively strong mix; the horizontal distribution patterns were uniform or near-uniform random. The distribution of neighborhood comparison and opening degree changed with a fluctuant pattern, but thinning decreased the competitive intensities to some extent. A composite structure index (Ci) was established, based on the relative importance of the above four indicators, to evaluate the overall effect of thinning on stand structure characteristics. The findings showed that Ci increased with the increase of thinning intensity, that is, the stand spatial structure became more complex. This indicated that Ci may be a simple and rapid indicator to evaluate the overall effect of thinning on stand spatial structure within densities after thinning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Anthropogenic Impact on Erosion Intensity: Case Study of Rural Areas of Pirot and Dimitrovgrad Municipalities, Serbia
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 826; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030826
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
PDF Full-text (3993 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In many Eastern European countries, the standard of living increased as a result of the process of industrialization in the second half of the 20th Century. Consequently, the population in rural areas with small-scale farming decreased due to the availability of employment elsewhere.
[...] Read more.
In many Eastern European countries, the standard of living increased as a result of the process of industrialization in the second half of the 20th Century. Consequently, the population in rural areas with small-scale farming decreased due to the availability of employment elsewhere. This directly impacted soil erosion (and thereby sustainability of the land), but the degree and direction are not well known. This study investigates two municipalities within Serbia, their change in population and its impact on land use changes and soil erosion. The standard of living increased after the industrialization process in the 1960s within these municipalities. The erosion potential model is used to calculate gross annual erosion. The changes related to population and arable land in rural settlements are analyzed according to proportional spatial changes. The results show an overall decrease of erosion intensity in the study area. In addition, two basic findings are derived: first, the highest level of human impact on soil is in rural settlements at the lowest elevation zones, where erosion intensity shows the least amount of decrease; and, second, the most intensive depopulation process, recorded in higher elevation zones, indicates a rapid decrease of erosion intensity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Vegetation Succession on Degraded Sites in the Pomacochas Basin (Amazonas, N Peru)—Ecological Options for Forest Restoration
Sustainability 2018, 10(3), 609; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10030609
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 11 February 2018 / Accepted: 24 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
PDF Full-text (3185 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Andes of northern Peru are still widely covered with forests, but increasingly suffer from habitat fragmentation. Subsequent soil degradation often leads to the abandonment of overused forests and pastures. Ecological knowledge on the restoration potential, e.g., on dependencies of soil conditions and
[...] Read more.
The Andes of northern Peru are still widely covered with forests, but increasingly suffer from habitat fragmentation. Subsequent soil degradation often leads to the abandonment of overused forests and pastures. Ecological knowledge on the restoration potential, e.g., on dependencies of soil conditions and altitude, is scarce. Therefore, we compared soil and vegetation patterns along nine transects within the upper Pomacochas Basin, which is an important biodiversity corridor along the Andes, between remaining forests, succession sites and pastures. Anthropogenic successional and disturbance levels, geological substrate, and altitude have the most important ecological impacts on vegetation and tree species composition. Species responded to sandstone versus calcareous substrates, but also to depths of the organic soil layer, and light conditions. The absence of organic layers under pastures contrasted with the accumulation of thick organic layers under forest cover. Vegetation composition at succession sites revealed certain starting points (herbal stage, bush stage, or secondary forest) for restoration that will determine the length of regeneration paths. Pre-forest patches of Alchornea sp. and Parathesis sp. may act as habitat stepping stones for expeditiously restoring biocorridors for wildlife. The key findings can contribute to the sustainable use and conservation of biodiversity in a fragile ecoregion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Actual and Balanced Stand Structure: Examples from Beech-Fir-Spruce Old-Growth Forests in the Area of the Dinarides in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Sustainability 2018, 10(2), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10020540
Received: 31 December 2017 / Revised: 28 January 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 17 February 2018
PDF Full-text (1991 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Old-growth forests are spontaneously developed forest ecosystems without direct human influence in which only natural processes take place. In this study we analyzed the structural sustainability of beech-fir-spruce old-growth forests on dolomite and limestone in the Bosnian Dinaric Mountains. The field work was
[...] Read more.
Old-growth forests are spontaneously developed forest ecosystems without direct human influence in which only natural processes take place. In this study we analyzed the structural sustainability of beech-fir-spruce old-growth forests on dolomite and limestone in the Bosnian Dinaric Mountains. The field work was carried out on permanent experimental plots of 1.0 hectare in size. Thereby, the diameters (d1.30) and the height (h) of all trees within the plots were measured. Based on the available literature, we hypothesized that the structure of old-growth forests provides sustainability through tree-size demographic equilibrium. Thus, the data collected were used to test possible differences between the actual and the theoretically balanced structure in the studied old-growth forests. Statistically significant difference in the actual structure between the two old-growth forests on limestone and dolomite was determined. However, both of them exhibited sustainable diameter distributions. These results point to the importance of preserving old-growth forests for future research as they exemplify the tree-size demographic sustainability and can thus serve as an appropriate reference to managed forests. Concretely, certain structural attributes from old-growth forests could be embedded into the management objectives for increased resilience of managed forests. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Floristic Diversity and Cultural Importance in Agroforestry Systems on Small-Scale Farmer’s Livelihoods in Central Veracruz, México
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010279
Received: 29 December 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 16 January 2018 / Published: 22 January 2018
PDF Full-text (9374 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
México is a cultural and biological megadiverse country with an increased anthropogenic pressure on its tropical landscapes. The study area was the ejido “Los Ídolos”, Misantla, Central Veracruz, Mexico. The main objective of this research was to identify how the woody plant diversity
[...] Read more.
México is a cultural and biological megadiverse country with an increased anthropogenic pressure on its tropical landscapes. The study area was the ejido “Los Ídolos”, Misantla, Central Veracruz, Mexico. The main objective of this research was to identify how the woody plant diversity of agroforestry systems contributed to the cultural, economic, and subsistence security of local farmers. Five different agroforestry systems were identified: forest gardens (FG), home gardens (HG), plantation crop combination with perennial cultivates (PC), plantation crop combinations with annual cultivates (AC), and trees on pastures (TP). FG systems had the highest floristic diversity, followed by HG and TP. Interviews with farmers showed that FG, HG, and PC systems were important for maintaining cultural identity and secure subsistence needs, while PC and TP systems were important for improving the economic situation of farmers. The FG systems contained only native species, while the proportion of exotic plants differed among the other systems. Useful exotic plants were found in the HG system. This study demonstrated that agroforestry systems such as FG were not used to their full potential, despite their high diversity of useful plants. It is recommended that farmers—assisted by institutions and representatives of local product chains—conduct feasibility studies on the marketing and promotion of products derived from specific agroforestry systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Environmental and Community Stability of a Mountain Destination: An Analysis of Residents’ Perception
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010070
Received: 3 December 2017 / Revised: 24 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 29 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1263 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aims to explore the use of the social-ecological system (SES) in tourism of a mountain area. Authors examined residents’ perceptions of tourism impacts on four SES aspects: ecosystems, local knowledge, people and technology and property rights institutions. The aim is to
[...] Read more.
This study aims to explore the use of the social-ecological system (SES) in tourism of a mountain area. Authors examined residents’ perceptions of tourism impacts on four SES aspects: ecosystems, local knowledge, people and technology and property rights institutions. The aim is to find area that will be a “common ground” for community and area that can be a source of conflict and will require additional work to solve the differences. Second objective was to examine residents’ perception towards future local development tourism policies (winter tourism, seasonality and environment and culture) and how those policies can affect natural, socio-economic and cultural aspects of mountain area. Residents’ perceptions of sustainable tourism development potential, perceived tourism impacts, analysis of community attachment and employment sector of stakeholder were involved in this study. The authors applied the Q-methodology, as one SES-allied approach, in a small mountain community of Kopaonik, the Republic of Serbia. The results revealed that residents’ agreement/disagreement is connected with two aspects: ecosystem and property rights and that ecosystem can be significantly influenced by all three development policies. Findings suggest that development of future natural conservation plans and new cultural attractions can have positive effects on all parts of social-ecological system. Some practical implications of those findings for tourism planning and development are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Tourism as an Approach to Sustainable Rural Development in Post-Socialist Countries: A Comparative Study of Serbia and Slovenia
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10010054
Received: 2 December 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 24 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (987 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The research deals with the sustainable development of the Serbian and Slovenian countryside, under the influence of tourism progress. The article identifies the main rural tourism competitiveness in Serbia and Slovenia, as one of the essential factors of rural development in both countries,
[...] Read more.
The research deals with the sustainable development of the Serbian and Slovenian countryside, under the influence of tourism progress. The article identifies the main rural tourism competitiveness in Serbia and Slovenia, as one of the essential factors of rural development in both countries, analyzing the main contributions and making a series of proposals to guide the future research agenda. The aim of the paper is to clarify around one obviously defined objective—to point out the competitiveness of sustainable rural tourism in typical post-socialist settings. The data for this study were collected using the Integrated Model of Destination Competitiveness to observe Serbian and Slovenian competitiveness in tourism. Determinants were assessed using a survey evaluating four demanding factors and 20 supporting factors, based upon a five-point Likert Scale. The results indicated that the friendliness of residents towards visitors, easy communication between them, together with quality of infrastructure and health facilities show the highest level of statistical correlation. These are the main propositions to start an initiative for the authorities in local communities to actively participate in sustainable rural development. The findings provide tourism stakeholders with relevant respondents’ perceptions pertaining to the tourism development in non-urban areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Forest Maintenance Practices and Wood Energy Alternatives to Increase Uses of Forest Resources in a Local Initiative in Nishiwaga, Iwate, Japan
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 1949; https://doi.org/10.3390/su9111949
Received: 1 September 2017 / Revised: 4 October 2017 / Accepted: 25 October 2017 / Published: 26 October 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2615 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study assesses the impact of wood energy use under underutilized conditions of wood resources: the impact on promotion of forest maintenance practices (FMPs), user costs, and local economies, using the case of a local initiative in Nishiwaga, Iwate, Japan. We conducted two
[...] Read more.
This study assesses the impact of wood energy use under underutilized conditions of wood resources: the impact on promotion of forest maintenance practices (FMPs), user costs, and local economies, using the case of a local initiative in Nishiwaga, Iwate, Japan. We conducted two main analyses: resource and economic assessment. For resource assessment, we investigate whether wood supply from FMP residue is sufficient to sustainably satisfy new demand created by a local initiative in Nishiwaga, and in how much forest area can FMPs be performed to satisfy the demand. These questions are analyzed by linear programming. Regarding economic assessment, we investigate whether replacement of fossil fuel by wood energy brings economic benefit to a user and local economy using input–output analysis. Our overall findings demonstrated that the use of wood energy under underutilized situations can lead to an increase of implementations of FMPs and of domestic wood resource supplies from a short-term perspective that comes from residues of the FMPs. We also found that wood energy consumption introduces co-benefits in terms of reduced heating costs for users and a larger economic impact on the local economy than fossil fuel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Ecology and Forest Management)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top