E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Emma L. Tompkins

Geography & Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human dimensions of global environmental change
Guest Editor
Dr. Natalie Suckall

Geography & Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: migration, adaptation and climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and our climate continues to change (IPCC, 2014). The world now faces unprecedented threats from increased climate variability and change, the impact of which is compounded by chronic poverty, inequality and rapid urbanisation (Foresight, 2012). This combination of climatic and socio-economic pressures is expected to exert pressure on the ability of individual nations to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). There is clear demand for policy guidance on how to deliver climate adaptation and mitigation goals in the most efficient way whilst also supporting sustainable development. This has led to a quest for initiatives that could be described as ‘triple-wins’ where efficienies are gained by delivering joint action on climate change adaptation, mitigation and development.

The aim of this Special Issue is to document, reflect upon and critique the emerging notion of joint action on climate adaptation, mitigation and development. We ask: Can triple wins be found, how are they generated, who benefits, and at what cost? Further, we consider: Can joint effort on climate change adaptation, mitigation and development offer supplementary benefits that a focus on each action alone would not generate? Under what circumstances can these triple wins be generated, and are the wins sustainable? We anticipate that this special issue will include empirical evidence of joint action, modelled impacts of joint action—with a focus on sustainability, and critical reflections on the pursuit of joint action in a variety of contexts. We anticipate that a robust analysis of contemporary joint action should shift the debate on triple wins forward, and contribute to both policy and academic debates about sustainable futures under climate change.

Prof. Dr. Emma L. Tompkins
Dr. Natalie Suckall
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate adaptation
  • Climate mitigation
  • Sustainable development
  • Poverty alleviation
  • Trade-offs
  • Triple wins

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Socially Just Triple-Wins? A Framework for Evaluating the Social Justice Implications of Climate Compatible Development
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 211; doi:10.3390/su10010211
Received: 9 October 2017 / Revised: 22 December 2017 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 16 January 2018
PDF Full-text (444 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Climate compatible development (CCD) aims to help people improve their lives in the face of climate threats without exacerbating these threats for current and future generations. It is proving an attractive concept to both academics and practitioners. However, the social justice implications of
[...] Read more.
Climate compatible development (CCD) aims to help people improve their lives in the face of climate threats without exacerbating these threats for current and future generations. It is proving an attractive concept to both academics and practitioners. However, the social justice implications of CCD have not yet been comprehensively explored and an absence of adequate evaluation frameworks has led to multiple, legitimate cross-scalar social justice claims being marginalised. This article develops a framework to guide holistic social justice evaluation of CCD initiatives across levels and scales. Underpinning this framework is a social justice approach that embraces particularism, pluralism and procedural justice. Drawing on existing research, the framework is used to explore the implications of the Clean Development Mechanism for recognition, participation and distribution in the Least Developed Countries. Findings show that achieving social justice through CCD is not a given; rather, the social justice implications of CCD differ within and between levels and scales. We conclude by suggesting ways in which our framework can be applied to augment knowledge on CCD. Understanding the processes through which social justices and injustices are created is integral to considerations of whether and how CCD should be used to underpin a new development landscape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Assessing the Integration of Climate Change and Development Strategies at Local Levels: Insights from Muheza District, Tanzania
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 174; doi:10.3390/su10010174
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 3 January 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2018 / Published: 12 January 2018
PDF Full-text (1100 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Integration of climate change measures in local development planning and delivery of Climate Compatible Development (CCD) at local levels is widely advocated to assist achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Such integration is not straightforward, and limited knowledge on multi-level governance of CCD
[...] Read more.
Integration of climate change measures in local development planning and delivery of Climate Compatible Development (CCD) at local levels is widely advocated to assist achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Such integration is not straightforward, and limited knowledge on multi-level governance of CCD exists. To progress this critical enquiry, we build on the concept of Climate Policy Integration (CPI) to assess how climate change measures are integrated in local development planning. We investigate the existing institutional arrangements across local levels (village to district) and sectors, and the barriers to and opportunities for CCD within local government authorities (LGAs). Particularly, we draw on qualitative analysis of local development policy and interviews conducted with LGAs in Muheza District of Tanzania. Findings show that several barriers, including under-resourcing, unreliable information on climate impacts, and the lack of guidelines for climate-development in key national policies are hindering the process towards CCD in local development planning. This study suggests that building capacity both within LGAs and at the national level are required to achieve CCD at sub-national levels. Currently, measures to address climate change are mostly implemented by development partners, so coordination between LGAs and these external stakeholders is essential to ensure consistency between climate and development objectives. Finally, our findings support a flexible approach to CCD, where emphasis on each of the three components of CCD—mitigation, adaptation, and development—can vary across time and space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Innovative Corporate Initiatives to Reduce Climate Risk: Lessons from East Asia
Sustainability 2018, 10(1), 13; doi:10.3390/su10010013
Received: 31 October 2017 / Revised: 17 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
PDF Full-text (406 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Businesses, investors, and insurers are requiring better quantitative assessments of their exposure to climate risks and their impact on climate change. They are incorporating these assessments in their day-to-day management and long-term investment decisions. Already, there are efforts to develop international guidelines, common
[...] Read more.
Businesses, investors, and insurers are requiring better quantitative assessments of their exposure to climate risks and their impact on climate change. They are incorporating these assessments in their day-to-day management and long-term investment decisions. Already, there are efforts to develop international guidelines, common policies and legal frameworks for such assessments, as well as the desire to foster climate financing. We examine recent progress in East Asia and the rest of the world in setting targets, pricing policies, and other mechanisms to reduce climate risks. We develop a model that demonstrates how reduced climate risk management may lower the total cost of capital of firms, thus making them more attractive to investors. We discuss the additional policies needed to support improved climate risk management in investment decisions, private investments in climate science, technology and innovation (STI) expansion, and more widespread adoption of climate financing and principles. Central banks, financial authorities, and governments can advance this objective by creating financial incentives to support investment decision-making. This would take into account factors such as improving climate performance, establishing better climate risk management and reporting requirements to foster green STI, and developing international guidelines and common policy and legal frameworks to support better climate risk management, assessments and reporting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Assessing Coherence between Sector Policies and Climate Compatible Development: Opportunities for Triple Wins
Sustainability 2017, 9(11), 2130; doi:10.3390/su9112130
Received: 9 October 2017 / Revised: 12 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 18 November 2017
PDF Full-text (254 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Climate Compatible Development (CCD) aims to deliver adaptation and mitigation without compromising development progress. To date, adaptation, mitigation and development related to key climate-sensitive sectors have often been treated separately. This paper uses qualitative document analysis, content analysis, expert interviews and a multi-stakeholder
[...] Read more.
Climate Compatible Development (CCD) aims to deliver adaptation and mitigation without compromising development progress. To date, adaptation, mitigation and development related to key climate-sensitive sectors have often been treated separately. This paper uses qualitative document analysis, content analysis, expert interviews and a multi-stakeholder workshop to: examine the extent to which policies in climate-sensitive sectors align in framing adaptation, mitigation and development action; and identify key areas of policy coherence in Ghana. The paper answers the following questions: (i) To what extent are Ghana’s agriculture, energy, water, forest and wildlife sector policies aligned with climate adaptation, mitigation and development? (ii) What is the extent of policy coherence amongst climate-sensitive sector policies? (iii) Where are the key intervention points available to enhance CCD activities? Findings demonstrate that Ghana’s climate-sensitive sector policies in agriculture, water, energy, forest and wildlife arenas have elements that demonstrate good alignment with adaptation, mitigation, and development priorities. However, as yet, there is only “limited coherence” between climate-sensitive sector policies. The paper identifies the following intervention points: (i) the need to attach greater importance to the threat posed by climate change to agriculture; and (ii) the need to address the lack of inter-agency and inter-ministerial approaches for building partnerships with other stakeholders. Multi-stakeholder workshop discussions highlighted significant challenges relating to limited coordination amongst institutions and agencies, limited institutional capacity and a lack of resources in ensuring coherence. This requires strengthening of national institutions such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide appropriate mechanisms to ensure effective collaboration amongst climate-sensitive sectors to deliver “triple wins”. The EPA could exert greater influence by nominating “climate champions” in sector ministries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development)
Open AccessArticle Identifying the Potential for Climate Compatible Development Efforts and the Missing Links
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1642; doi:10.3390/su9091642
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 15 September 2017
PDF Full-text (220 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Those examining climate compatible development and triple-win policy efforts that simultaneously negotiate sustainable development, climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation considerations are on the cutting edge of exploring why and how policymakers address complex social problems that require balancing considerations about multiple,
[...] Read more.
Those examining climate compatible development and triple-win policy efforts that simultaneously negotiate sustainable development, climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation considerations are on the cutting edge of exploring why and how policymakers address complex social problems that require balancing considerations about multiple, interrelated policy issues. Enhancing understanding of factors underlying the emergence of these efforts can help strengthen incentives for action, address implementation challenges, and anticipate inequities. This paper uses survey responses from 287 cities and logistic regression analyses to explore conditions and policy actions associated with potential climate compatible development efforts when economic development, sustainability, climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation considerations overlap. It finds evidence that potential climate compatible development efforts were present in 10% of the cities studied. Adaptation was the issue most likely to act as the missing link when each of these other issues influenced city policy actions, and mitigation was the least likely. Contextual factors associated with these efforts included budget stress, leadership from a policy entrepreneur, higher college degree attainment rates, having an environmental department or commission, and the area of the city composed of water versus land. Examining factors associated with these issues acting as missing links revealed contradictions that highlight the necessity of further exploration of processes affecting the pursuit of climate compatible development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development)
Back to Top