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Special Issue "Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2017

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Emma L. Tompkins

Geography & Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human dimensions of global environmental change
Guest Editor
Dr. Natalie Suckall

Geography & Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: migration, adaptation and climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise and our climate continues to change (IPCC, 2014). The world now faces unprecedented threats from increased climate variability and change, the impact of which is compounded by chronic poverty, inequality and rapid urbanisation (Foresight, 2012). This combination of climatic and socio-economic pressures is expected to exert pressure on the ability of individual nations to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). There is clear demand for policy guidance on how to deliver climate adaptation and mitigation goals in the most efficient way whilst also supporting sustainable development. This has led to a quest for initiatives that could be described as ‘triple-wins’ where efficienies are gained by delivering joint action on climate change adaptation, mitigation and development.

The aim of this Special Issue is to document, reflect upon and critique the emerging notion of joint action on climate adaptation, mitigation and development. We ask: Can triple wins be found, how are they generated, who benefits, and at what cost? Further, we consider: Can joint effort on climate change adaptation, mitigation and development offer supplementary benefits that a focus on each action alone would not generate? Under what circumstances can these triple wins be generated, and are the wins sustainable? We anticipate that this special issue will include empirical evidence of joint action, modelled impacts of joint action—with a focus on sustainability, and critical reflections on the pursuit of joint action in a variety of contexts. We anticipate that a robust analysis of contemporary joint action should shift the debate on triple wins forward, and contribute to both policy and academic debates about sustainable futures under climate change.

Prof. Dr. Emma L. Tompkins
Dr. Natalie Suckall
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate adaptation
  • Climate mitigation
  • Sustainable development
  • Poverty alleviation
  • Trade-offs
  • Triple wins

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Identifying the Potential for Climate Compatible Development Efforts and the Missing Links
Sustainability 2017, 9(9), 1642; doi:10.3390/su9091642
Received: 11 August 2017 / Revised: 1 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 September 2017 / Published: 15 September 2017
PDF Full-text (220 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Those examining climate compatible development and triple-win policy efforts that simultaneously negotiate sustainable development, climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation considerations are on the cutting edge of exploring why and how policymakers address complex social problems that require balancing considerations about multiple,
[...] Read more.
Those examining climate compatible development and triple-win policy efforts that simultaneously negotiate sustainable development, climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation considerations are on the cutting edge of exploring why and how policymakers address complex social problems that require balancing considerations about multiple, interrelated policy issues. Enhancing understanding of factors underlying the emergence of these efforts can help strengthen incentives for action, address implementation challenges, and anticipate inequities. This paper uses survey responses from 287 cities and logistic regression analyses to explore conditions and policy actions associated with potential climate compatible development efforts when economic development, sustainability, climate change mitigation, and climate change adaptation considerations overlap. It finds evidence that potential climate compatible development efforts were present in 10% of the cities studied. Adaptation was the issue most likely to act as the missing link when each of these other issues influenced city policy actions, and mitigation was the least likely. Contextual factors associated with these efforts included budget stress, leadership from a policy entrepreneur, higher college degree attainment rates, having an environmental department or commission, and the area of the city composed of water versus land. Examining factors associated with these issues acting as missing links revealed contradictions that highlight the necessity of further exploration of processes affecting the pursuit of climate compatible development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Adaptation, Mitigation and Development)

Journal Contact

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Sustainability Editorial Office
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Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
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