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Special Issue "New Frontiers of Multiscale Monitoring, Analysis and Modeling of Environmental Systems via Integration of Remote and Proximal Sensing Measurements"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Pietro Tizzani

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per il Rilevamento Elettromagnetico dell’Ambiente, Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Napoli, Italy; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Sezione di Napoli Osservatorio Vesuviano (INGV), Via Diocleziano 328, 80124 Napoli, Italy
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Guest Editor
Dr. Luca D’Auria

Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN), Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Spain; Instituto Tecnológico y de Energías Renovables (ITER), Granadilla de Abona, Tenerife, Spain
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Guest Editor
Dr. Nemesio M. Perez

Instituto Volcanológico de Canarias (INVOLCAN), Puerto de la Cruz, Tenerife, Spain; Instituto Tecnológico y de Energías Renovables (ITER), Granadilla de Abona, Tenerife, Spain
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Guest Editor
Dr. Antonello Bonfante

Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Istituto per i sistemi Agricoli e Forestali del Mediterraneo, Via Patacca, 85 - 80056 Ercolano, Napoli, Italy
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Guest Editor
Dr. Francesco Soldovieri

Institute for Electromagnetic Sensing of the Environment, National Research Council, Via Diocleziano, 80124, Napoli, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 081 7620651
Interests: electromagnetic modeling; inverse electromagnetic scattering; radar imaging; doppler radar; microwave tomography; synthetic aperture radar

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue aims to present recent results and advances in approaches to investigate and understand environmental systems, with a focus on the study of the interaction between environmental processes occurring at different scales.

These advances have paved the way to the design and implementation of multi-platform remote and in-situ sensing systems, and tools for surveillance and monitoring. In particular, special attention is devoted to the development of new techniques and integrated instrumentation for multiscale monitoring of areas affected by high natural risks, such as volcanic, seismic, slope instability and other environmental contexts.

We expect contributions where remote sensing is combined with and improved by other disciplines such as applied geophysics, seismology, geodesy, geochemistry, volcanology, geotechnical and soil science. Contributions reporting analytical and numerical modeling of environmental processes are also welcome. Finally, a special focus will be on multi-parametric analysis by integrating data acquired by remote sensing with other different sources, including the use of GeoWeb platforms.

Dr. Pietro Tizzani
Dr. Luca D’Auria
Dr. NemesioPerez
Dr. Antonello Bonfante
Dr. Francesco Soldovieri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • remote sensing
  • multiscale monitoring, data analysis
  • modelling of environmental system

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Satellite and Ground Remote Sensing Techniques to Trace the Hidden Growth of a Lava Flow Field: The 2014–2015 Effusive Eruption at Fogo Volcano (Cape Verde)
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(7), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10071115
Received: 14 June 2018 / Revised: 3 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 12 July 2018
PDF Full-text (4756 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Fogo volcano erupted in 2014–2015 producing an extensive lava flow field in the summit caldera that destroyed two villages, Portela and Bangaeira. The eruption started with powerful explosive activity, lava fountains, and a substantial ash column accompanying the opening of an eruptive fissure.
[...] Read more.
Fogo volcano erupted in 2014–2015 producing an extensive lava flow field in the summit caldera that destroyed two villages, Portela and Bangaeira. The eruption started with powerful explosive activity, lava fountains, and a substantial ash column accompanying the opening of an eruptive fissure. Lava flows spreading from the base of the eruptive fissure produced three arterial lava flows. By a week after the start of the eruption, a master lava tube had already developed within the eruptive fissure and along the arterial flow. In this paper, we analyze the emplacement processes based on observations carried out directly on the lava flow field, remote sensing measurements carried out with a thermal camera, SO2 fluxes, and satellite images, to unravel the key factors leading to the development of lava tubes. These were responsible for the rapid expansion of lava for the ~7.9 km length of the flow field, as well as the destruction of the Portela and Bangaeira villages. The key factors leading to the development of tubes were the low topography and the steady magma supply rate along the arterial lava flow. Comparing time-averaged discharge rates (TADR) obtained from satellite and Supply Rate (SR) derived from SO2 flux data, we estimate the amount and timing of the lava flow field endogenous growth, with the aim of developing a tool that could be used for hazard assessment and risk mitigation at this and other volcanoes. Full article
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Open AccessArticle A Controlled-Site Comparison of Microwave Tomography and Time-Reversal Imaging Techniques for GPR Surveys
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(2), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10020214
Received: 2 October 2017 / Revised: 10 January 2018 / Accepted: 26 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
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Abstract
This paper provides a comparative study between microwave tomography and synthetic time-reversal imaging techniques as applied to ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. The comparison is carried out by processing experimental data collected at a controlled test site, with different types of buried targets
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This paper provides a comparative study between microwave tomography and synthetic time-reversal imaging techniques as applied to ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. The comparison is carried out by processing experimental data collected at a controlled test site, with different types of buried targets at given subsurface depths and representative soil conditions. It is shown that the two techniques allow us to obtain complementary information about position, depth and size of the targets from a single GPR survey. Full article
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Other

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Open AccessTechnical Note Distributed Fiber Optic Sensors for the Monitoring of a Tunnel Crossing a Landslide
Remote Sens. 2018, 10(8), 1291; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs10081291
Received: 3 July 2018 / Revised: 26 July 2018 / Accepted: 12 August 2018 / Published: 15 August 2018
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Abstract
This work reports on the application of a distributed fiber-optic strain sensor for long-term monitoring of a railway tunnel affected by an active earthflow. The sensor has been applied to detect the strain distribution along an optical fiber attached along the two walls
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This work reports on the application of a distributed fiber-optic strain sensor for long-term monitoring of a railway tunnel affected by an active earthflow. The sensor has been applied to detect the strain distribution along an optical fiber attached along the two walls of the tunnel. The experimental results, relative to a two-year monitoring campaign, demonstrate that the sensor is able to detect localized strains, identify their location along the tunnel walls, and follow their temporal evolution. Full article
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