Special Issue "Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials"

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A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2014)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jordi Sort
Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA) and Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Spain
Website: http://jsort-icrea.uab.cat/
E-Mail: jordi.sort@uab.cat
Phone: +34 93 581 2085
Fax: +34 93 581 2155
Interests: porous and continuous films; lithographed systems; amorphous alloys; nanocomposites; nanomagnetism; nanomechanics

Guest Editor
Dr. Eva Pellicer
Departament de Física, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Spain
E-Mail: Eva.Pellicer@uab.cat
Phone: +34-93-581-1401
Interests: synthesis of nanomaterials; electrodeposition; nanocasting; ordered mesoporous metal oxides; porous films

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interest in mesoporous materials is fostered by their widespread technological application in diverse areas, such as heterogeneous catalysis, gas sensors, solid electrolytes for rechargeable batteries, supercapacitors or optoelectronic and magnetic devices, amongst others. With a pore size of 2–50 nm, tunable pore topologies and extremely large surface areas, mesoporous materials hold a privileged position between zeolites and macroporous materials. Ordered mesoporous powders can be synthesized using two different approaches: soft-templating and hard-templating methods, whereas ordered mesoporous thin films are typically synthesized by the evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA) method.

This Special Issue is aimed at providing selected contributions on advances in the synthesis, characterization and application of non-siliceous, inorganic, ordered mesoporous materials in both powder and thin film forms. The range of materials includes metal oxides, metals, semiconductors, carbons, and nitrides. Special emphasis is laid on their potential uses in energy storage and conversion and magnetism.

Prof. Dr. Jordi Sort
Dr. Eva Pellicer
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • ordered mesoporous inorganic materials
  • mesoporous powders
  • mesoporous films
  • templating, evaporation induced self assembly, magnetic properties, electrocatalysis
  • solar cells, fuel cells, batteries

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Displaying article 1-7
p. 813-826
by , , , , , , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(3), 813-826; doi:10.3390/nano4030813
Received: 20 May 2014; in revised form: 18 August 2014 / Accepted: 25 August 2014 / Published: 11 September 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials)
p. 712-725
by , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(3), 712-725; doi:10.3390/nano4030712
Received: 6 June 2014; in revised form: 4 August 2014 / Accepted: 5 August 2014 / Published: 18 August 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials)
abstract graphic
p. 700-711
by , , , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(3), 700-711; doi:10.3390/nano4030700
Received: 25 June 2014; in revised form: 21 July 2014 / Accepted: 22 July 2014 / Published: 6 August 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials)
p. 686-699
by , , , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(3), 686-699; doi:10.3390/nano4030686
Received: 15 June 2014; in revised form: 25 July 2014 / Accepted: 25 July 2014 / Published: 4 August 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials)
p. 583-598
by , , , , , , , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(3), 583-598; doi:10.3390/nano4030583
Received: 15 June 2014; in revised form: 11 July 2014 / Accepted: 14 July 2014 / Published: 30 July 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials)
p. 189-202
by , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(2), 189-202; doi:10.3390/nano4020189
Received: 11 March 2014; in revised form: 22 March 2014 / Accepted: 23 March 2014 / Published: 28 March 2014
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ordered Mesoporous Nanomaterials)
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p. 157-174
by , , , , , , , ,  and
Nanomaterials 2014, 4(1), 157-174; doi:10.3390/nano4010157
Received: 21 January 2014; in revised form: 28 February 2014 / Accepted: 1 March 2014 / Published: 10 March 2014
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
High temperature synthesis of ordered mesoporous aluminosilicates from ZSM-5 nanoseeds for improved hydrocarbon cracking activity
Authors:
Hoan Vu, Andreas Martin
Affiliations:
Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, D-18059 Rostock, A.-Einstein-Str. 29a, Germany
Abstract:
Ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analogs with different molar Si/Al ratios were prepared in a two-step process from the self-assembly of ZSM-5 nanoseeds at high temperature in mild acidic media (200 °C, pH 3.5). The obtained products were characterized by SAXS, N2-adsorption, TEM, FTIR, 27Al MAS-NMR, NH3-TPD, AAS and ICP. The results show that the molar Si/Al ratio in the initial gel used for the synthesis of ZSM-5 precursors strongly affects the physicochemical properties of the final materials. A highly condensed, well-ordered mesoporous SBA-15 analog with significantly improved hydrothermal stability and acidic properties can be obtained from low Al-containing ZSM-5 precursors (molar Si/Al ratio ≥20). Reducing the molar Si/Al ratio to 10, however, leads to the formation of disordered mesoporous SBA-15 type materials with significantly degraded textural and acidic properties due to the large fraction of octahedral Al. In all cases, most of Al in the initial gel has been successfully incorporated into the final product. Gas phase cracking of cumene reveals that SBA-15 analogs are more active compared to conventional Al-SBA-15, which further confirms the increased density of acid sites, particularly of strong Bronsted sites, as a result of the preservation of zeolite building units in the mesoporous walls.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Mesoporous Materials Enhance the Solubility of Anti-tuberculosis Pharmaceutical Compounds
Authors:
Xin Xia 1, 2, Lluis Ballell 3, Jonathan Cechetto 4, Kevin Pethe 4 and Alfonso Garcia-Bennett 2,*
Affiliations:

1
Nanologica AB, Drottning Kristinas Väg 61, 11428 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
3
Diseases of the Developing World, GlaxoSmithKline, Severo Ochoa 2, 28769 Tres Cantos, Madrid, Spain
4
Antibacterial Drug Discovery, Institute Pasteur Korea, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea Korea
Abstract:
Over the last ten years there has been a tremendous effort to introduce mesoporous silica nanomaterials, defined as silica particles containing ordered or disordered pores in the range between 2-50nm, into the pharmaceutical industry as functional excipients to tailor the release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). Whilst there has been many written reports on the role that mesoporous materials may play in sustained drug release, triggered or targeted release; the first applications for these materials may be in improving the bioavailability of poorly soluble substances. The main reason for this is that whilst there are competing new and established technologies that tackle issues of targeting or sustained release, there are only a few industrial methods to improve the solubility of newly discovered drug compounds with poorly soluble profiles, so called class II (low soluble and high permeable) and IV (low soluble and low permeable) APIs according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS). In this report we offer three, examples of how mesoporous materials can be utilized to enhance the solubility of anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) drug compounds with poor solubility and formulation issues such as PA-824, a nitroimidazole, as well as its potential use in combination studies with other anti-TB compounds. Intracellular results show that mesoporous silica is a promising drug delivery vehicle for TB drug compounds such as PA-824, which deliver an intensive dose of drug to TB-infected macrophages and achieve a better antituberculosis activity. More poorly water-soluble antituberculosis drug could be chosen for further in vitro intracellular study to understand more about the mechanism.

Type of Paper: Article
Title: Effect of porosity and concentration polarization on electrolyte diffusive transport parameters through ceramic membranes with similar nanopore size
Authors:
V. Romero, V. Vega, J. García, V.M. Prida, B. Hernando and J. Benavente *
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Physics, University of Málaga, E-29071 Málaga, Spain
Abstract:
Nanoporous alumina structures or membranes (NPAMs) that are obtained by electrochemical anodization of aluminum foils through the two-step method exhibit highly ordered pores arrays/arrangement with a honeycomb structure, having pores radii usually in the range 10 nm to 100 nm and thickness between 10 mm and 100 mm [1-2]. The well-defined porous structure of NPAMs and the possibility of modification of both pore size and surface nature by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique [3-4] have lately increased their application in molecular release and sensor devices [5]-6. However, the contribution of different interfacial effects, such as concentration-polarization, that is the formation of a solution stagnant layer with a concentration profile on the membrane surface, might affect more or less significantly to the transport of a particular solute or ion, mainly in the case of low porosity membranes and charged species, masking the values of the evaluated transport parameters.
In this work, we study the effect of membrane porosity in the diffusive transport of ions through three nanoporous alumina membranes with similar pore radii(~ 10 nm) and thickness (~ 60 mm), but different porosity, as well as the effect of surface modification (SiO2 coverage by ALD) for a sample with final pore size similar than the alumina ones. Transport characterization is carried out by analyzing membrane potential measurements performed with NaCl solutions at different concentrations, which allow the evaluation of diffusive parameters (ions transport numbers or diffusion coefficients) [7]. Moreover, interfacial effects have also been considered by comparing membrane potential values obtained with stirred and no-stirred solutions. Differences in diffusive parameters determined for the different samples could provide information on the influence of interfacial effects on diffusive transport.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Impact of alloy microstructure, thickness and composition on the morphology of nano or meso-porous metal film formed by chemical de-alloying
Authors:
Bao Lin 1, Lingxue Kong 1, Peter Hodgson 1, Ludovic Dumée 1,2*
Affiliation
s: 1 Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds 3216, Victoria, Australia
2
Institute for Sustainability and Innovation, Victoria University, Werribee 3030, Victoria, Australia
Abstract:
Nano-textured porous metal materials present unique surface properties due to their enhanced surface energy with potential applications in sensing, molecular separation and catalysis. In this paper, commercial alloy foils, including gold-silver (Au50Ag50), brass (Cu85Zn15 and Cu70Zn30) foils have been chemically de-alloyed to form nano-porous thin films. The impact of the initial alloy micro-structure and number of phases, as well as chemical de-alloying parameters, including etchant concentration, time and solution temperature on the final nano-porous thin film morphology and properties were investigated by porometry, pyknometery, atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy. Furthermore, the penetration depth of the pores across the alloys were evaluated through the preparation of cross sections by focus ion beam milling. It is demonstrated that ordered pores ranging between 100 and 600 nm in diameter and 2-5 μm in depth can be successfully formed for the range of materials tested. The microstructure of the foils were obtained by electron back-scattered diffraction and linked to development of pits across the material thickness and surface during de-alloying. The role of selective etching of both noble and sacrificial metal phases of the alloy were discussed in light of the competitive surface etching across the range of microstructures and materials tested.

Type of Paper: Article
Title:
Fabrication of meso-porous sintered metal thin films by selective etching of silica based sacrificial template
Authors:
Ludovic Dumée 1*, Leonora Velleman 1, Mary She 1, Mikel Duke 2, Stephen Gray 2, Peter Hodgson 1, Lingxue Kong 1
Affiliation
s: 1 Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds 3216, Victoria, Australia
2
Institute for Sustainability and Innovation, Victoria University, Werribee 3030, Victoria, Australia
Abstract:
Meso-porous metal materials have enhanced surface energies offering unique surface properties with potential applications in chemical catalysis, molecular sensing and selective separation. In this paper, commercial 20 nm diameter metal nano-particles, including silver, copper and nickel, were blended with silica nano-particles by shear mixing. The resulting powders were cold-sintered to form dense, hybrid thin films. The sacrificial silica template was then removed by selective etching in 12 wt% hydrofluoric acid solutions for 15 min to reveal a purely metallic meso-porous thin film material. The impact of the initial silica nano-particle diameter (8 – 20 nm) as well as the sintering pressure (5 – 20 ton/m2) and etching conditions on the final nano-porous thin films morphology and properties were investigated by porometry, pyknometery, gas and liquid permeation and electron microscopy. Furthermore, the morphology of the pores and particle aggregation during shear mixing were assessed through cross-sectioning by focus ion beam milling. It is demonstrated that ordered pores ranging between 50 and 300 nm in diameter and porosities up to 45 % can be successfully formed for the range of materials tested.

References:
[1] H. Masuda, K. Fukuda, Science 268 (1995) 1466-1468.
[2] Martin et al, Microp. & Mesoporous Materials 151 (2012) 311.
[3] M. Knez, K. Nielsch, L. Niinistö, Advanced Materials 19 (2007) 3425-3438.
[4] Romero, V.; Vega, V.; García, J.; Zierold, R.; Nielsch, K.; Prida, V.M.; Hernando, B.; Benavente, J.  ACS Appl. Mater. & Interfaces 5, (2013) 3556-3564.
[5] L. Moreno i Codinachs, C. Birkenstock, T. Garma, R. Zierold, J. Bachmann, K. Nielsch, M. J. Schöning, A. Fontcuberta i Morral, Physica Status Solidi A 206 (2009) 435-441.
[6] D.-H. Kwak, J.-B. Yoo, D.J. Kim, Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 10 (2010) 345-348.
[7] V. Romero, V. Vega, J. García, V.M. Prida, B. Hernando, J. Benavente, J. Colloids Interface Sci. 376 (2012) 40-46.

Last update: 10 March 2014

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