Special Issue "Nanomaterials in Sensors"

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A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Joseph J. BelBruno

Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanomaterials Research, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 603 646 3946
Interests: imprinted polymers; sensors; surface-nanocluster interactions; chemistry of new nanomaterials; computational chemistry; nanomaterial coatings

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Nanomaterials will explore the use of nanomaterials in the development of new sensing materials and sensing devices. Nanoscale materials offer new, size-dependent properties in comparison to bulk samples of the same materials. These properties, i.e., electrical conductance, magnetic response, chemical interactions, in combination with the physical size of the materials provide new opportunities to provide sensitive and specific sensing of gases and liquids.
This issue will include reports on new materials, the characterization of nanomaterials to be applied to sensing, the development of sensing systems employing nanomaterials and applications of nanomaterials to the detection of specific chemical species.

Prof. Dr. Joseph J. BelBruno
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • characterization
  • chemical sensors
  • conductance
  • magnetism
  • sensing systems
  • nanowires
  • nanoclusters

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Nanomaterials in Sensors
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(4), 572-573; doi:10.3390/nano3040572
Received: 8 October 2013 / Accepted: 10 October 2013 / Published: 14 October 2013
PDF Full-text (114 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is focused on the continuing implementation of nanomaterials and nanostructures in the development of more sensitive and more specific sensing devices. As a result, these new devices employ smaller sensing elements and provide more “real time” capability. Often,
[...] Read more.
This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is focused on the continuing implementation of nanomaterials and nanostructures in the development of more sensitive and more specific sensing devices. As a result, these new devices employ smaller sensing elements and provide more “real time” capability. Often, the inclusion of nanomaterials leads to sensing elements for targets that were previously inaccessible. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)

Research

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Open AccessArticle Nanostructure-Directed Chemical Sensing: The IHSAB Principle and the Effect of Nitrogen and Sulfur Functionalization on Metal Oxide Decorated Interface Response
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(3), 469-485; doi:10.3390/nano3030469
Received: 27 June 2013 / Revised: 26 July 2013 / Accepted: 29 July 2013 / Published: 7 August 2013
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (381 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The response matrix, as metal oxide nanostructure decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are modified in situ through direct amination and through treatment with organic sulfides and thiols, is demonstrated. Nanostructured TiO2, SnOx, NiO and CuxO (x
[...] Read more.
The response matrix, as metal oxide nanostructure decorated n-type semiconductor interfaces are modified in situ through direct amination and through treatment with organic sulfides and thiols, is demonstrated. Nanostructured TiO2, SnOx, NiO and CuxO (x = 1,2), in order of decreasing Lewis acidity, are deposited to a porous silicon interface to direct a dominant electron transduction process for reversible chemical sensing in the absence of significant chemical bond formation. The metal oxide sensing sites can be modified to decrease their Lewis acidity in a process appearing to substitute nitrogen or sulfur, providing a weak interaction to form the oxynitrides and oxysulfides. Treatment with triethylamine and diethyl sulfide decreases the Lewis acidity of the metal oxide sites. Treatment with acidic ethane thiol modifies the sensor response in an opposite sense, suggesting that there are thiol (SH) groups present on the surface that provide a Brønsted acidity to the surface. The in situ modification of the metal oxides deposited to the interface changes the reversible interaction with the analytes, NH3 and NO. The observed change for either the more basic oxynitrides or oxysulfides or the apparent Brønsted acid sites produced from the interaction of the thiols do not represent a simple increase in surface basicity or acidity, but appear to involve a change in molecular electronic structure, which is well explained using the recently developed inverse hard and soft acids and bases (IHSAB) model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)
Open AccessArticle CO and NO2 Selective Monitoring by ZnO-Based Sensors
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(3), 357-369; doi:10.3390/nano3030357
Received: 21 May 2013 / Revised: 20 June 2013 / Accepted: 21 June 2013 / Published: 5 July 2013
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (1418 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
ZnO nanomaterials with different shapes were synthesized, characterized and tested in the selective monitoring of low concentration of CO and NO2 in air. ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and nanofibers (NFs) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method in supercritical conditions and electrospinning technique,
[...] Read more.
ZnO nanomaterials with different shapes were synthesized, characterized and tested in the selective monitoring of low concentration of CO and NO2 in air. ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and nanofibers (NFs) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method in supercritical conditions and electrospinning technique, respectively. CO and NO2 sensing tests have demonstrated that the annealing temperature and shape of zinc oxide nanomaterials are the key factors in modulating the electrical and sensing properties. Specifically, ZnO NPs annealed at high temperature (700 °C) have been found sensitive to CO, while they displayed negligible response to NO2. The opposite behavior has been registered for the one-dimensional ZnO NFs annealed at medium temperature (400 °C). Due to their adaptable sensitivity/selectivity characteristics, the developed sensors show promising applications in dual air quality control systems for closed ambient such as automotive cabin, parking garage and tunnels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)
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Open AccessCommunication Separation of Short Single- and Double-Stranded DNA Based on Their Adsorption Kinetics Difference on Graphene Oxide
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(2), 221-228; doi:10.3390/nano3020221
Received: 18 March 2013 / Revised: 27 March 2013 / Accepted: 28 March 2013 / Published: 4 April 2013
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (196 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Separation of short single- and double-stranded DNA typically requires gel electrophoresis followed by DNA extraction, which is a time consuming process. Graphene oxide adsorbs single-stranded DNA more quickly than double-stranded ones, allowing for selective removal of the former with a simple mixing and
[...] Read more.
Separation of short single- and double-stranded DNA typically requires gel electrophoresis followed by DNA extraction, which is a time consuming process. Graphene oxide adsorbs single-stranded DNA more quickly than double-stranded ones, allowing for selective removal of the former with a simple mixing and centrifugation operation. The effect of DNA length and salt on adsorption selectivity has been characterized and its application in DNA melting curve measurement has been demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials for Sensor Applications
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(4), 615-637; doi:10.3390/nano3040615
Received: 19 September 2013 / Revised: 14 November 2013 / Accepted: 14 November 2013 / Published: 26 November 2013
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (776 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and
[...] Read more.
Molecular imprinting is a well-established technology to mimic antibody-antigen interaction in a synthetic platform. Molecularly imprinted polymers and nanomaterials usually possess outstanding recognition capabilities. Imprinted nanostructured materials are characterized by their small sizes, large reactive surface area and, most importantly, with rapid and specific analysis of analytes due to the formation of template driven recognition cavities within the matrix. The excellent recognition and selectivity offered by this class of materials towards a target analyte have found applications in many areas, such as separation science, analysis of organic pollutants in water, environmental analysis of trace gases, chemical or biological sensors, biochemical assays, fabricating artificial receptors, nanotechnology, etc. We present here a concise overview and recent developments in nanostructured imprinted materials with respect to various sensor systems, e.g., electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive, etc. Finally, in light of recent studies, we conclude the article with future perspectives and foreseen applications of imprinted nanomaterials in chemical sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)
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Open AccessReview Current Trends in Sensors Based on Conducting Polymer Nanomaterials
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(3), 524-549; doi:10.3390/nano3030524
Received: 18 July 2013 / Revised: 15 August 2013 / Accepted: 16 August 2013 / Published: 27 August 2013
Cited by 41 | PDF Full-text (5655 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Conducting polymers represent an important class of functional organic materials for next-generation electronic and optical devices. Advances in nanotechnology allow for the fabrication of various conducting polymer nanomaterials through synthesis methods such as solid-phase template synthesis, molecular template synthesis, and template-free synthesis. Nanostructured
[...] Read more.
Conducting polymers represent an important class of functional organic materials for next-generation electronic and optical devices. Advances in nanotechnology allow for the fabrication of various conducting polymer nanomaterials through synthesis methods such as solid-phase template synthesis, molecular template synthesis, and template-free synthesis. Nanostructured conducting polymers featuring high surface area, small dimensions, and unique physical properties have been widely used to build various sensor devices. Many remarkable examples have been reported over the past decade. The enhanced sensitivity of conducting polymer nanomaterials toward various chemical/biological species and external stimuli has made them ideal candidates for incorporation into the design of sensors. However, the selectivity and stability still leave room for improvement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)
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Open AccessReview Conducting Polyaniline Nanowire and Its Applications in Chemiresistive Sensing
Nanomaterials 2013, 3(3), 498-523; doi:10.3390/nano3030498
Received: 1 July 2013 / Revised: 28 July 2013 / Accepted: 29 July 2013 / Published: 7 August 2013
Cited by 60 | PDF Full-text (999 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
One dimensional polyaniline nanowire is an electrically conducting polymer that can be used as an active layer for sensors whose conductivity change can be used to detect chemical or biological species. In this review, the basic properties of polyaniline nanowires including chemical structures,
[...] Read more.
One dimensional polyaniline nanowire is an electrically conducting polymer that can be used as an active layer for sensors whose conductivity change can be used to detect chemical or biological species. In this review, the basic properties of polyaniline nanowires including chemical structures, redox chemistry, and method of synthesis are discussed. A comprehensive literature survey on chemiresistive/conductometric sensors based on polyaniline nanowires is presented and recent developments in polyaniline nanowire-based sensors are summarized. Finally, the current limitations and the future prospect of polyaniline nanowires are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Sensors)
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