Special Issue "New Developments in Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversions"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Shuangqiang Chen

Humboldt Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, Stuttgart 70569, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: materials chemistry; electrochemistry and electroanalysis; functional carbon based materials; porous materials(marco-, meso-, micro-); Li/Na/Al ion batteries; Li/Na air batteries; Li-S batteries; supercapacitors.
Guest Editor
Dr. Laifa Shen

Humboldt Research Fellow, High-cited Reseacher 2016, by Thomson Reuters Co., Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, Stuttgart 70569, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: materials chemistry; electrochemistry and electroanalysis; functional carbon based materials; porous materials(marco-, meso-, micro-); Li/Na/Al ion batteries; supercapacitors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the fast development of modern society, global energy demand is dramatically increasing to power millions of electronic devices and electric vehicles. Fossil fuels should be gradually substituted by renewable energy sources due to severe environmental pollution. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to developing novel materials for energy-related rechargeable systems, including lithium/sodium ion batteries, lithium/sodium sulfur batteries, metal-air batteries, and supercapacitors. Nonetheless, great challenges still remain to optimize the electrochemical performance of rechargeable batteries, such as low initial Coulombic efficiency, unstable solid electrolyte interfaces, electrode pulverization and capacity fades. Novel techniques for highly efficient energy conversions and stable electrocatalysis are critically required. New developments in material fabrications or reaction mechanism discoveries in rechargeable batteries are highly welcomed.

In this Special Issue of New Developments in Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversions, we would like to invite submissions of review articles and original research papers from leading groups in the fields of rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, solar cells and supercapacitors.

Dr. Shuangqiang Chen
Dr. Laifa Shen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • lithium ion batteries
  • sodium ion batteries
  • aluminum ion batteries
  • lithium sulfur batteries
  • sodium sulfur batteries
  • lithium oxygen batteries
  • electrocatalysis/photocatalysis
  • supercapacitors
  • functionalized carbon based materials
  • highly ordered or porous materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Flexible Carbon Nanotube Modified Separator for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(8), 196; doi:10.3390/nano7080196
Received: 10 July 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 21 July 2017 / Published: 26 July 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2178 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have become promising candidates for electrical energy storage systems due to their high theoretical specific energy density, low cost and environmental friendliness. However, there are some technical obstacles of lithium-sulfur batteries to be addressed, such as the shuttle effect of
[...] Read more.
Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have become promising candidates for electrical energy storage systems due to their high theoretical specific energy density, low cost and environmental friendliness. However, there are some technical obstacles of lithium-sulfur batteries to be addressed, such as the shuttle effect of polysulfides. Here, we introduced organically modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a coating layer for the separator to optimize structure and enhance the performance of the Li-S battery. The results showed that the cell with a CNTs-coated separator exhibited an excellent cycling performance. Compared to the blank separator, the initial discharge capacity and the capacity after 100 cycles for the CNTs-coated separator was increased by 115% and 161%, respectively. Besides, according to the rate capability test cycling from 0.1C to 2C, the battery with a CNTs-coated separator still released a capacity amounting to 90.2% of the initial capacity, when the current density returned back to 0.1C. It is believed that the organically modified CNTs coating effectively suppresses the shuttle effect during the cycling. The employment of a CNTs-coated separator provides a promising approach for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversions)
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Open AccessArticle Preparation of Ce- and La-Doped Li4Ti5O12 Nanosheets and Their Electrochemical Performance in Li Half Cell and Li4Ti5O12/LiFePO4 Full Cell Batteries
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(6), 150; doi:10.3390/nano7060150
Received: 17 May 2017 / Revised: 8 June 2017 / Accepted: 16 June 2017 / Published: 20 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4654 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work reports on the synthesis of rare earth-doped Li4Ti5O12 nanosheets with high electrochemical performance as anode material both in Li half and Li4Ti5O12/LiFePO4 full cell batteries. Through the combination of
[...] Read more.
This work reports on the synthesis of rare earth-doped Li4Ti5O12 nanosheets with high electrochemical performance as anode material both in Li half and Li4Ti5O12/LiFePO4 full cell batteries. Through the combination of decreasing the particle size and doping by rare earth atoms (Ce and La), Ce and La doped Li4Ti5O12 nanosheets show the excellent electrochemical performance in terms of high specific capacity, good cycling stability and excellent rate performance in half cells. Notably, the Ce-doped Li4Ti5O12 shows good electrochemical performance as anode in a full cell which LiFePO4 was used as cathode. The superior electrochemical performance can be attributed to doping as well as the nanosized particle, which facilitates transportation of the lithium ion and electron transportation. This research shows that the rare earth doped Li4Ti5O12 nanosheets can be suitable as a high rate performance anode material in lithium-ion batteries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversions)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Recent Progresses and Development of Advanced Atomic Layer Deposition towards High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(10), 325; doi:10.3390/nano7100325
Received: 31 August 2017 / Revised: 23 September 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 14 October 2017
PDF Full-text (12253 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Electrode materials and electrolytes play a vital role in device-level performance of rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, electrode structure/component degeneration and electrode-electrolyte sur-/interface evolution are identified as the most crucial obstacles in practical applications. Thanks to its congenital advantages, atomic layer deposition (ALD)
[...] Read more.
Electrode materials and electrolytes play a vital role in device-level performance of rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, electrode structure/component degeneration and electrode-electrolyte sur-/interface evolution are identified as the most crucial obstacles in practical applications. Thanks to its congenital advantages, atomic layer deposition (ALD) methodology has attracted enormous attention in advanced LIBs. This review mainly focuses upon the up-to-date progress and development of the ALD in high-performance LIBs. The significant roles of the ALD in rational design and fabrication of multi-dimensional nanostructured electrode materials, and finely tailoring electrode-electrolyte sur-/interfaces are comprehensively highlighted. Furthermore, we clearly envision that this contribution will motivate more extensive and insightful studies in the ALD to considerably improve Li-storage behaviors. Future trends and prospects to further develop advanced ALD nanotechnology in next-generation LIBs were also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversions)
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Open AccessReview One-Dimensional Electron Transport Layers for Perovskite Solar Cells
Nanomaterials 2017, 7(5), 95; doi:10.3390/nano7050095
Received: 12 February 2017 / Revised: 3 April 2017 / Accepted: 24 April 2017 / Published: 29 April 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2981 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport
[...] Read more.
The electron diffusion length (Ln) is smaller than the hole diffusion length (Lp) in many halide perovskite semiconductors meaning that the use of ordered one-dimensional (1D) structures such as nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) as electron transport layers (ETLs) is a promising method of achieving high performance halide perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). ETLs consisting of oriented and aligned NWs and NTs offer the potential not merely for improved directional charge transport but also for the enhanced absorption of incoming light and thermodynamically efficient management of photogenerated carrier populations. The ordered architecture of NW/NT arrays affords superior infiltration of a deposited material making them ideal for use in HPSCs. Photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 18% have been demonstrated for HPSCs using 1D ETLs. Despite the advantages of 1D ETLs, there are still challenges that need to be overcome to achieve even higher PCEs, such as better methods to eliminate or passivate surface traps, improved understanding of the hetero-interface and optimization of the morphology (i.e., length, diameter, and spacing of NWs/NTs). This review introduces the general considerations of ETLs for HPSCs, deposition techniques used, and the current research and challenges in the field of 1D ETLs for perovskite solar cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Nanomaterials for Energy Storage and Conversions)
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