Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jiye (James) Fang

Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 607 777 3752
Fax: +1 425 988 1050
Interests: synthesis of shape- and size-controlled metallic nanocrystals and their electrocatalytic applications in fuel cells (both anode and cathode); self-assembly and superstructure of nanopolyhedra (both single- and binary compositions); synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and their thermoelectric/photovoltaic applications; synthesis of 1D and core-shell structured functional nanomaterials; high-pressure exploration of nanopolyhedron-based superlattices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to invite you to submit an original research paper or comprehensive review for inclusion in a high-profile issue on the use of nanomaterials for energy and sustainability applications, to be published in the journal Nanomaterials. Nanomaterials cross a bridge between bulk materials and substances on an atomic/molecular scale, and have shown various novel and interesting properties, especially in energy and sustainability properties.

This Special Issue will focus on how employing nanomaterials in energy research, which includes, but is not limited to, the added benefits of using nanomaterials for catalyzing important chemical conversions, for enhancing photovoltaic conversion and energy storage, and for device development of renewable energy harvest, based on characteristics governed by the surface, composition, phase and structure of nanomaterials. This issue will include a mix of full papers, communications, reviews, and mini-reviews.

Nanomaterials will facilitate the peer-reviewing and will make the final editorial decisions. All manuscripts will be published online as quickly as possible. Submission of manuscripts to Nanomaterials must go via http://www.mdpi.com/journal/nanomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Jiye (James) Fang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • synthesis and chemical preparation
  • nanomaterials (nanocrystals, nanowires, nanotubes, etc.)
  • nanocomposites
  • crystal facets and surface characteristics
  • characterization
  • computation and simulation
  • fuel cell catalysts
  • battery materials
  • capacitors and supercapacitors
  • thermoelectric materials
  • photovoltaic performance
  • electrochemical study
  • self-assembly
  • green catalysis
  • carbon-based nanomaterials
  • photosynthesis and photocatalysis
  • plasmatic and microwave applications
  • magnetic and optical applications
  • piezoelectricity
  • phase transition and nanostructure
  • other nano-devices

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Graphene/Sulfur/Carbon Nanocomposite for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(3), 1481-1492; doi:10.3390/nano5031481
Received: 1 July 2015 / Revised: 18 August 2015 / Accepted: 28 August 2015 / Published: 1 September 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1763 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Here, we report a two-step synthesis of graphene/sulfur/carbon ternary composite with a multilayer structure. In this composite, ultrathin S layers are uniformly deposited on graphene nanosheets and covered by a thin layer of amorphous carbon derived from β-cyclodextrin on the surface. Such a
[...] Read more.
Here, we report a two-step synthesis of graphene/sulfur/carbon ternary composite with a multilayer structure. In this composite, ultrathin S layers are uniformly deposited on graphene nanosheets and covered by a thin layer of amorphous carbon derived from β-cyclodextrin on the surface. Such a unique microstructure, not only improves the electrical conductivity of sulfur, but also effectively inhibits the dissolution of polysulfides during charging/discharging processes. As a result, this ternary nanocomposite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance. It can deliver a high initial discharge and charge capacity of 1410 mAh·g1 and 1370 mAh·g1, respectively, and a capacity retention of 63.8% can be achieved after 100 cycles at 0.1 C (1 C = 1675 mA·g1). A relatively high specific capacity of 450 mAh·g1 can still be retained after 200 cycles at a high rate of 2 C. The synthesis process introduced here is simple and broadly applicable to the modification of sulfur cathode for better electrochemical performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Mechanical Dispersion of Nanoparticles and Its Effect on the Specific Heat Capacity of Impure Binary Nitrate Salt Mixtures
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(3), 1136-1146; doi:10.3390/nano5031136
Received: 25 May 2015 / Revised: 18 June 2015 / Accepted: 19 June 2015 / Published: 29 June 2015
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (1957 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this study, the effect of nanoparticle concentration was tested for both CuO and TiO2 in eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium nitrate. Results showed an enhancement in specific heat capacity (Cp) for both types of nanoparticles (+10.48% at
[...] Read more.
In this study, the effect of nanoparticle concentration was tested for both CuO and TiO2 in eutectic mixture of sodium and potassium nitrate. Results showed an enhancement in specific heat capacity (Cp) for both types of nanoparticles (+10.48% at 440 °C for 0.1 wt % CuO and +4.95% at 440 °C for 0.5 wt % TiO2) but the behavior toward a rise in concentration was different with CuO displaying its highest enhancement at the lowest concentration whilst TiO2 showed no concentration dependence for three of the four different concentrations tested. The production of cluster of nanoparticles was visible in CuO but not in TiO2. This formation of nanostructure in molten salt might promote the enhancement in Cp. However, the size and shape of these structures will most likely impact the energy density of the molten salt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle A Sustainable Approach to Fabricating Ag Nanoparticles/PVA Hybrid Nanofiber and Its Catalytic Activity
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 1124-1135; doi:10.3390/nano5021124
Received: 13 May 2015 / Revised: 16 June 2015 / Accepted: 18 June 2015 / Published: 23 June 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (5601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by using Ficus altissima Blume leaf extract as a reducing agent at room temperature. The resulting Ag nanoparticles/PVA mixture was employed to create Ag nanoparticles/PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) hybrid nanofibers via an electrospinning technique. The obtained nanofibers were confirmed by
[...] Read more.
Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by using Ficus altissima Blume leaf extract as a reducing agent at room temperature. The resulting Ag nanoparticles/PVA mixture was employed to create Ag nanoparticles/PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) hybrid nanofibers via an electrospinning technique. The obtained nanofibers were confirmed by means of UV-Vis spectroscopy, The X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and then tested to catalyze KBH4 reduction of methylene blue (MB). The catalytic results demonstrate that the MB can be reduced completely within 15 min. In addition, the Ag nanoparticles/PVA hybrid nanofibers show reusability for three cycles with no obvious losses in degradation ratio of the MB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Crosslinked Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composites as a Pseudocapacitive Material with High Cycling Stability
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 1034-1047; doi:10.3390/nano5021034
Received: 28 April 2015 / Revised: 15 May 2015 / Accepted: 3 June 2015 / Published: 11 June 2015
Cited by 11 | PDF Full-text (1837 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The poor cycling stability of polyaniline (PANI) limits its practical application as a pseudocapacitive material due to the volume change during the charge-discharge procedure. Herein, crosslinked carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (C-CNTs/PANI) composites had been designed by the in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in
[...] Read more.
The poor cycling stability of polyaniline (PANI) limits its practical application as a pseudocapacitive material due to the volume change during the charge-discharge procedure. Herein, crosslinked carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (C-CNTs/PANI) composites had been designed by the in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of crosslinked carbon nanotubes (C-CNTs), which were obtained by coupling of the functionalized carbon nanotubes with 1,4-benzoquinone. The composite showed a specific capacitance of 294 F/g at the scan rate of 10 mV/s, and could retain 95% of its initial specific capacitance after 1000 CV cycles. Such high electrochemical cycling stability resulting from the crosslinked skeleton of the C-CNTs makes them potential electrode materials for a supercapacitor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Thermal Emission Control via Bandgap Engineering in Aperiodically Designed Nanophotonic Devices
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 814-825; doi:10.3390/nano5020814
Received: 22 April 2015 / Revised: 8 May 2015 / Accepted: 13 May 2015 / Published: 20 May 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (506 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Aperiodic photonic crystals can open up novel routes for more efficient photon management due to increased degrees of freedom in their design along with the unique properties brought about by the long-range aperiodic order as compared to their periodic counterparts. In this work
[...] Read more.
Aperiodic photonic crystals can open up novel routes for more efficient photon management due to increased degrees of freedom in their design along with the unique properties brought about by the long-range aperiodic order as compared to their periodic counterparts. In this work we first describe the fundamental notions underlying the idea of thermal emission/absorption control on the basis of the systematic use of aperiodic multilayer designs in photonic quasicrystals. Then, we illustrate the potential applications of this approach in order to enhance the performance of daytime radiative coolers and solar thermoelectric energy generators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Graphene Oxide Synthesis from Agro Waste
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 826-834; doi:10.3390/nano5020826
Received: 6 April 2015 / Revised: 9 May 2015 / Accepted: 12 May 2015 / Published: 20 May 2015
Cited by 15 | PDF Full-text (473 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A new method of graphene oxide (GO) synthesis via single-step reforming of sugarcane bagasse agricultural waste by oxidation under muffled atmosphere conditions is reported. The strong and sharp X-ray diffraction peak at 2θ = 11.6° corresponds to an interlayer distance of 0.788 nm
[...] Read more.
A new method of graphene oxide (GO) synthesis via single-step reforming of sugarcane bagasse agricultural waste by oxidation under muffled atmosphere conditions is reported. The strong and sharp X-ray diffraction peak at 2θ = 11.6° corresponds to an interlayer distance of 0.788 nm (d002) for the AB stacked GOs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) confirm the formation of the GO layer structure and the hexagonal framework. This is a promising method for fast and effective synthesis of GO from sugarcane bagasse intended for a variety of energy and environmental applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Metal Organic Framework Micro/Nanopillars of Cu(BTC)·3H2O and Zn(ADC)·DMSO
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 565-576; doi:10.3390/nano5020565
Received: 3 March 2015 / Revised: 26 March 2015 / Accepted: 30 March 2015 / Published: 9 April 2015
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (1250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, we report the optical and thermal properties of Cu(BTC)·3H2O (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) and Zn(ADC)·DMSO (ADC = 9,10- anthracenedicarboxylic acid, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) micro/nanopillars. The morphologies of MOFs on surfaces are most in the
[...] Read more.
In this work, we report the optical and thermal properties of Cu(BTC)·3H2O (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) and Zn(ADC)·DMSO (ADC = 9,10- anthracenedicarboxylic acid, DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide) metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) micro/nanopillars. The morphologies of MOFs on surfaces are most in the form of micro/nanopillars that were vertically oriented on the surface. The size and morphology of the pillars depend on the evaporation time, concentration, solvent, substrate, and starting volume of solutions. The crystal structures of the nanopillars and micropillars are the same, confirmed by powder XRD. Zn(ADC)·DMSO pillars have a strong blue fluorescence. Most of ADC in the pillars are in the form of monomers, which is different from ADC in the solid powder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle Synthesis and Adsorption Property of SiO2@Co(OH)2 Core-Shell Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 554-564; doi:10.3390/nano5020554
Received: 10 February 2015 / Revised: 17 March 2015 / Accepted: 19 March 2015 / Published: 3 April 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Silica nanoparticles were directly coated with cobalt hydroxide by homogeneous precipitation of slowly decomposing urea in cobalt nitrate solution. The cobalt hydroxide was amorphous, and its morphology was nanoflower-like. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of the core-shell composite was 221 m2/g.
[...] Read more.
Silica nanoparticles were directly coated with cobalt hydroxide by homogeneous precipitation of slowly decomposing urea in cobalt nitrate solution. The cobalt hydroxide was amorphous, and its morphology was nanoflower-like. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area of the core-shell composite was 221 m2/g. Moreover, the possible formation procedure is proposed: the electropositive cobalt ions were first adsorbed on the electronegative silica nanoparticles surface, which hydrolyzed to form cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles. Then, the cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles were aggregated to form nanoflakes. Finally, the nanoflakes self-assembled, forming cobalt hydroxide nanoflowers. Adsorption measurement showed that the core-shell composite exhibited excellent adsorption capability of Rhodamine B (RB). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessArticle A Novel Arch-Shape Nanogenerator Based on Piezoelectric and Triboelectric Mechanism for Mechanical Energy Harvesting
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(1), 36-46; doi:10.3390/nano5010036
Received: 26 November 2014 / Accepted: 18 December 2014 / Published: 26 December 2014
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1088 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A simple and cost-effective approach was developed to fabricate piezoelectric and triboelectric nanogenerator (P-TENG) with high electrical output. Additionally, pyramid micro structures fabricated atop a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface were employed to enhance the device performance. Furthermore, piezoelectric barium titanate (BT) nanoparticles and multiwalled
[...] Read more.
A simple and cost-effective approach was developed to fabricate piezoelectric and triboelectric nanogenerator (P-TENG) with high electrical output. Additionally, pyramid micro structures fabricated atop a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface were employed to enhance the device performance. Furthermore, piezoelectric barium titanate (BT) nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were mixed in the PDMS film during the forming process. Meanwhile, the composition of the film was optimized to achieve output performance, and favorable toughness was achieved after thermal curing. An arch-shape ITO/PET electrode was attached to the upper side of the polarized composite film and an aluminum film was placed under it as the bottom electrode. With periodic external force at 20 Hz, electrical output of this P-TENG, reached a peak voltage of 22 V and current of 9 μA with a peak current density of 1.13 μA/cm2, which was six times that of the triboelectric generator without BT and MWCNT nanoparticles. The nanogenerator can be directly used to lighten 28 commercial light-emitting diodes (LEDs) without any energy storage unit or rectification circuit under human footfalls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Energy Applications
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(4), 1732-1755; doi:10.3390/nano5041732
Received: 28 August 2015 / Revised: 26 September 2015 / Accepted: 2 October 2015 / Published: 21 October 2015
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (2400 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), which have a horn-shaped tip at the top
[...] Read more.
With the growth of the global economy and population, the demand for energy is increasing sharply. The development of environmentally a benign and reliable energy supply is very important and urgent. Single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), which have a horn-shaped tip at the top of single-walled nanotube, have emerged as exceptionally promising nanomaterials due to their unique physical and chemical properties since 1999. The high purity and thermal stability, combined with microporosity and mesoporosity, high surface area, internal pore accessibility, and multiform functionalization make SWCNHs promising candidates in many applications, such as environment restoration, gas storage, catalyst support or catalyst, electrochemical biosensors, drug carrier systems, magnetic resonance analysis and so on. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of SWCNHs in energy applications, including energy conversion and storage. The commonly adopted method to access SWCNHs, their structural modifications, and their basic properties are included, and the emphasis is on their application in different devices such as fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors, Li-ion batteries, Li-S batteries, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells and so forth. Finally, a perspective on SWCNHs’ application in energy is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessReview Textile-Based Electronic Components for Energy Applications: Principles, Problems, and Perspective
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(3), 1493-1531; doi:10.3390/nano5031493
Received: 5 August 2015 / Revised: 25 August 2015 / Accepted: 26 August 2015 / Published: 7 September 2015
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (5541 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to
[...] Read more.
Textile-based electronic components have gained interest in the fields of science and technology. Recent developments in nanotechnology have enabled the integration of electronic components into textiles while retaining desirable characteristics such as flexibility, strength, and conductivity. Various materials were investigated in detail to obtain current conductive textile technology, and the integration of electronic components into these textiles shows great promise for common everyday applications. The harvest and storage of energy in textile electronics is a challenge that requires further attention in order to enable complete adoption of this technology in practical implementations. This review focuses on the various conductive textiles, their methods of preparation, and textile-based electronic components. We also focus on fabrication and the function of textile-based energy harvesting and storage devices, discuss their fundamental limitations, and suggest new areas of study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessReview Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Electrochemical Capacitor Applications
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 906-936; doi:10.3390/nano5020906
Received: 1 April 2015 / Accepted: 27 May 2015 / Published: 2 June 2015
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (2603 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The advent of novel organic and inorganic nanomaterials in recent years, particularly nanostructured carbons, conducting polymers, and metal oxides, has enabled the fabrication of various energy devices with enhanced performance. In this paper, we review in detail different nanomaterials used in the fabrication
[...] Read more.
The advent of novel organic and inorganic nanomaterials in recent years, particularly nanostructured carbons, conducting polymers, and metal oxides, has enabled the fabrication of various energy devices with enhanced performance. In this paper, we review in detail different nanomaterials used in the fabrication of electrochemical capacitor electrodes and also give a brief overview of electric double-layer capacitors, pseudocapacitors, and hybrid capacitors. From a materials point of view, the latest trends in electrochemical capacitor research are also discussed through extensive analysis of the literature and by highlighting notable research examples (published mostly since 2013). Finally, a perspective on next-generation capacitor technology is also given, including the challenges that lie ahead. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessReview Multifunctional Carbon Nanostructures for Advanced Energy Storage Applications
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 755-777; doi:10.3390/nano5020755
Received: 9 April 2015 / Revised: 1 May 2015 / Accepted: 5 May 2015 / Published: 8 May 2015
Cited by 23 | PDF Full-text (1788 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and
[...] Read more.
Carbon nanostructures—including graphene, fullerenes, etc.—have found applications in a number of areas synergistically with a number of other materials. These multifunctional carbon nanostructures have recently attracted tremendous interest for energy storage applications due to their large aspect ratios, specific surface areas, and electrical conductivity. This succinct review aims to report on the recent advances in energy storage applications involving these multifunctional carbon nanostructures. The advanced design and testing of multifunctional carbon nanostructures for energy storage applications—specifically, electrochemical capacitors, lithium ion batteries, and fuel cells—are emphasized with comprehensive examples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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Open AccessReview Dealloying of Cu-Based Metallic Glasses in Acidic Solutions: Products and Energy Storage Applications
Nanomaterials 2015, 5(2), 697-721; doi:10.3390/nano5020697
Received: 4 February 2015 / Revised: 17 April 2015 / Accepted: 23 April 2015 / Published: 29 April 2015
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (5861 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Dealloying, a famous ancient etching technique, was used to produce nanoporous metals decades ago. With the development of dealloying techniques and theories, various interesting dealloying products including nanoporous metals/alloys, metal oxides and composites, which exhibit excellent catalytic, optical and sensing performance, have been
[...] Read more.
Dealloying, a famous ancient etching technique, was used to produce nanoporous metals decades ago. With the development of dealloying techniques and theories, various interesting dealloying products including nanoporous metals/alloys, metal oxides and composites, which exhibit excellent catalytic, optical and sensing performance, have been developed in recent years. As a result, the research on dealloying products is of great importance for developing new materials with superior physical and chemical properties. In this paper, typical dealloying products from Cu-based metallic glasses after dealloying in hydrofluoric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions are summarized. Several potential application fields of these dealloying products are discussed. A promising application of nanoporous Cu (NPC) and NPC-contained composites related to the energy storage field is introduced. It is expected that more promising dealloying products could be developed for practical energy storage applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Energy and Sustainability Applications)
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